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I'm currently taking an intro course to CSE and had a question from some material of the class. On one of the slides, the professor defines this method:

public int myMethod()
{
  int retval, itemp = 100;
  retval = itemp;
  {
     int retval, itemp = 75; 
     retval = itemp; 
  }
    return retval;
}

From what the professor said, retval returns/holds a value of 100, but when I opened up Eclipse/Command line and wrote the method, it wouldn't compile. It kept saying that retval was declared twice and therefore would not compile the program. Any guidance for what went wrong here? Also, what's the point of "retval = itemp;" ? They're both initialized to the same value, so is there a purpose for that line?

  • "They're both initialized to the same value" ? in line "int retval, itemp = 100;" they both are not initialised to same value. Only itemp is initialised. If you try to print the retval it will show error that the variable is not initialise. two variable are initialised to same value if it written retval=itemp=100; – Anurag Rana Oct 23 '13 at 1:32
  • Your professor was probably thinking of c/c++ where a code block {...} could have its own local variables. – PM 77-1 Oct 23 '13 at 2:01
1

Eclipse/Command line and wrote the method, it wouldn't compile. It kept saying that retval was declared twice and therefore would not compile the program.

Better perhaps would be code like so:

public class Foo {
   int retval, itemp = 100;


   public static void main(String[] args) {
      Foo foo = new Foo();
      System.out.println(foo.myMethod());
   }

   public int myMethod() {
      retval = itemp;
      {
         int retval, itemp = 75;
         retval = itemp;
      }
      return retval;
   }
}

Also, what's the point of "retval = itemp;" ?

This sets the retVal variable to hold a value.


They're both initialized to the same value, so is there a purpose for that line?

No they're not. itemp holds a different value in the two locations.

  • Ahh this makes a lot of sense; what my professor had written was very confusing. To calrify, because retval and itemp are redeclared in myMethod(), they are considered local variables and are therefore not visible outside of the " { } " ? Thank you for you help as well – xheyhenry Oct 23 '13 at 1:42
  • @xheyhenry: they are only visible within the scope of their declaration. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 23 '13 at 1:43
1

This does not compile because you cannot declare a variable with the same identifier twice in the same scope.

What you can do is to re-declare an existing variable in a given scope:

class MyClass {
  private int myVar = 1;

  public void redeclare() {
    // ...
    int myVar = 2;
    System.out.println(myVar);
    // ...
  }
}

This works because myVar is visible in the scope of redeclare() but wasn't declared in it!

The {} does not create a fully new scope so what your teacher wanted to do fails.

Furthermore:

int retval, itemp = 100;
retval = itemp;

Here the first line declares both retval and itemp but initializes only itemp so retval is uninitialized. That's why the second line assigns the itemp value to it. But since those are primitive values it will copy the value of itemp and put it on the stack so now you have 2 different values. Changing one won't change the other.

No offence to the prof. but if I were you I'd ditch those slides and grab a good book on Java (Core Java or Thinking in Java for instance) and some intro to CS book (since this is is the goal of this course?) like "Structures and interpretations of computer programs".

  • Thank you for your response, I had initially thought that the line int retval, itemp = 100; initialized BOTH variables. – xheyhenry Oct 23 '13 at 1:42

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