35

Can someone explain me why this code:

var marketValueData = new[] {
    new { A = "" },
    new { A = "" },
    new { B = "" },
};

Is giving me the error:

No best type found for implicitly-typed array

while this one works perfectly fine:

var marketValueData = new[] {
    new { A = "" },
    new { A = "" },
    new { A = "" },
};

Apart from a different property (B in the last entry of the first example), they are the same. Yet the first one is not compiling. Why?

4
  • 1
    Simpler sample would be new[] { 1, "text", true } - same issue with different element types, but much shorter. Commented Oct 23, 2013 at 7:28
  • 2
    @AlexeiLevenkov I've simplified it a bit, but your example is a different case (different types as opposed to different property names).
    – CodeCaster
    Commented Oct 23, 2013 at 7:34
  • 1
    @CodeCaster Could you edit the answers as well? At the moment, they don't seem related to the question :-( Commented Oct 23, 2013 at 7:35
  • 3
    @CodeCaster - Your edit is nice showing original problem. I guess actual question should have been "aren't all anonymous types of the same type, or what is definition of the same for anonymous types"... Commented Oct 23, 2013 at 7:40

5 Answers 5

43

You can use:

var marketValueData = new object[] {
    new { A = "" },
    new { A = "" },
    new { B = "" },
    ...,
};
2
  • 4
    This is the only solution given to the implicit problem in the question
    – Vladislav
    Commented Aug 22, 2018 at 10:48
  • 1
    I just came across this question and answer today since someone edited something here, and I'd say this answer falls short on the question because the question explicitly asks for an explanation of why it fails to compile, and this answer does nothing to try to explain this. Commented Jul 2, 2021 at 19:25
37

It's because you have two different anonymous types in the first example, the definition of the last item is different than the other ones.

In the first example , one containing an A property and one containing a B property, and the compiler can't figure out the type of array. In the second example there is one anonymous type, containing only A.

I think it's a typo, so you can change B to A in last entry in first example

From MSDN:

You can create an implicitly-typed array in which the type of the array instance is inferred from the elements specified in the array initializer.

0
6

Anonymous types must be the same. Just change B to A.

0
2

I had a similar problem in a code line like this

sqwOraContext.save(new[] { student, course });

student and course inherit both from SQWEntity but the compiler for some reason doesn't check the base type. Only setting the array type to SQWEntity resolved the error.

sqwOraContext.save(new SQWEntity[] { student, course });

Of course there is no need to specify the type in a line like this where student1, student2 are of the same type.

sqwOraContext.save(new[] { student1, student2 });

0

You can also write a strong anonymous type :

var d = default(string); // default value for A and B properties
var marketValueData = new[] {
    new { A = "", B = d },
    new { A = "", B = d },
    new { A = d, B = "" },
};
1
  • 1
    This still doesn't properly explain why the first piece of code in the question does not compile. Commented Jul 2, 2021 at 19:31

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