20

Sometimes I stared at js provided with google.com main page and found that they tended to use (0, obj.func)(args) syntax. Here are excerpts from the script:

 var _ = _ || {};
 (function (_) {
     var window = this;
     try {
         _.mb = function (a) {
             return (0, window.decodeURIComponent)(a.replace(/\+/g, " "))
         };
         _.zg = function (a, b) {
             for (var c = a.length ? a.split("&") : [], d = 0; d < c.length; d++) {
                 var e = c[d];
                 if ((0, _.Ag)(e) == b) return (c = /=(.*)$/.exec(e)) ? (0, _.mb)(c[1]) : null
             }
             return null
         };
         _.Ag = function (a) {
             return (a = /^(.+?)(?:=|$)/.exec(a)) ? (0, _.mb)(a[1]) : null
         };
         var Cg = function (a, b) {
                 var c = a.indexOf("?");
                 return 0 > c ? null : (0, _.zg)(a.substring(c + 1), b)
             };
         // Note var Cg called with no 0
         var oca = function (a) {
                 this.A = Cg(a, "mods");
                 this.B = Cg(a, "ver")
             };
     } catch (e) {}
 })(_);  

Why prepending 0?

  • 4
    possible duplicate of Javascript syntax (0, fn)(args) – JJJ Oct 23 '13 at 7:43
  • 6
    @Juhana but this time there's an actual answer, not just explanation of comma operator ;) – pawel Oct 23 '13 at 7:55
  • 1
    That is true. I kinda wish dystroy would have answered that question instead. – JJJ Oct 23 '13 at 7:56
  • 3
    Thanks to dystroy, I would rather mark that question as a duplicate to this one... – Passerby Oct 23 '13 at 8:00
  • 5
    Actually, all those other questions should be flagged as a duplicate of THIS question since this question has the correct answer. – slebetman Oct 23 '13 at 8:32
34

This makes an indirect call.

This ensures the context, in the called function, is the global one. This might be useful in an internal scope.

Example :

var a = {
  b: function(){
     console.log(this);    
  },
  c1: function(){
     this.b(); 
  },
  c2: function(){
     (0, this.b)(); 
  }
}
a.c1(); // logs a
a.c2(); // logs window
  • 2
    It looks like this answer differs from that duplicate... But where exactly is the documentation describing this behavior? – lyrically wicked Oct 23 '13 at 7:57
  • 1
    Keep in mind that this code is probably generated from another source, so I guess it's a result of an optimizer/minifier/whatever and probably not written that way by programmers. – pawel Oct 23 '13 at 7:58
  • 1
    @MackieeE yes. Sorry, I don't have time to comment more right now, I'm in a meeting... – Denys Séguret Oct 23 '13 at 8:12
  • 1
    @MackieeE It's probably the same before encryption. Personally I also use 0 when the value doesn't matter, as in Array.apply(0,Array(10)).map(Math.random). – Denys Séguret Oct 23 '13 at 9:03
  • 3
    @Anony-Mousse Some people value reliability, other people value simplicity of expression, yet more people value both. The fact that javascript isn't as reliable as java doesn't prevent it from being more expressive. They're on orthogonal axies. However being a more expressive language does allow it to be used in a way that is considerably less ugly and messy. – Racheet Oct 23 '13 at 11:44

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