37
h  = { a: 1 }
h2 = { b: 2 }
h3 = { c: 3 }

Hash#merge works for 2 hashes: h.merge(h2)

How to merge 3 hashes?

h.merge(h2).merge(h3) works but is there a better way?

1
  • 4
    As of Ruby 2.6, merge can take multiple hashes as arguments. More info here. – SRack Nov 16 '18 at 17:28

10 Answers 10

53

You could do it like this:

h, h2, h3  = { a: 1 }, { b: 2 }, { c: 3 }
a  = [h, h2, h3]

p Hash[*a.map(&:to_a).flatten] #= > {:a=>1, :b=>2, :c=>3}

Edit: This is probably the correct way to do it if you have many hashes:

a.inject{|tot, new| tot.merge(new)}
# or just
a.inject(&:merge)
5
  • That works for me 'as is', but not so much when it's more like h1, h2, h3 = { a: 1, b: 4}, { b: 2, c: 5}, {c: 3, a: 6} – Some Guy Oct 23 '13 at 17:50
  • Sorry, I was to quick to answer, see my update. In you example you have the key :a two times, one will be overwritten as a hash only can have distinct keys. – hirolau Oct 23 '13 at 18:03
  • 5
    Note that array.reduce(&:merge) is going to give you the same result as inject (inject is just an alias of reduce) – ocodo May 28 '14 at 9:20
  • Can someone elaborate the first solution. I didn't understand what p "Hash[*a.map(&:to_a).flatten]" does – zealouscoder Oct 8 '18 at 18:56
  • @ZealousCoder I'm late, but figured I'd drop an answer. Hash[] will accept a series of arguments and build a hash by pairing them up. As such, if you generate an ordered array from the hashes (via a.map(&:to_a).flatten) and use the splat operator to pass them as args, it will work nicely. However, Hash[] also accepts an array of 2-ary arrays representing k-v pairs and I would have written it as Hash[*a.flat_map(&:to_a)] – Brennan Feb 22 '19 at 3:03
20

Since Ruby 2.0 on that can be accomplished more graciously:

h.merge **h1, **h2

And in case of overlapping keys - the latter ones, of course, take precedence:

h  = {}
h1 = { a: 1, b: 2 }
h2 = { a: 0, c: 3 }

h.merge **h1, **h2
# => {:a=>0, :b=>2, :c=>3}

h.merge **h2, **h1
# => {:a=>1, :c=>3, :b=>2}
4
  • 1
    What ** does? – Arnold Roa Aug 13 '17 at 23:06
  • 1
    @ArnoldRoa - it unpackages the hash, analogous to the single splat operator ('*') for arrays. – bwv549 Aug 14 '17 at 1:25
  • 1
    Thanks @jayqui, that's a very important "gotcha". – jeffdill2 May 22 '18 at 14:03
  • 2
    Also note if for any reason h1 and h2 are {}. It'll raise and error. h.merge(**{}, **{}) – tiagomenegaz Mar 22 '19 at 19:29
17

You can just do

[*h,*h2,*h3].to_h
# => {:a=>1, :b=>2, :c=>3}

This works whether or not the keys are Symbols.

12

Ruby 2.6 allows merge to take multiple arguments:

h  = { a: 1 }
h2 = { b: 2 }
h3 = { c: 3 }
h4 = { 'c' => 4 }
h5 = {}

h.merge(h2, h3, h4, h5) # => {:a=>1, :b=>2, :c=>3, "c"=>4}

This works with Hash.merge! and Hash.update too. Docs for this here.

Also takes empty hashes and keys as symbols or strings.

Much simpler :)

2
  • 3
    Giving ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (given 2, expected 1) – Aarvy Dec 27 '18 at 12:23
  • 3
    Are you using Ruby 2.6 @RajanVerma? This is introduced there; with prior versions you'll get the error you're seeing. – SRack Dec 27 '18 at 14:32
7

Answer using reduce (same as inject)

hash_arr = [{foo: "bar"}, {foo2: "bar2"}, {foo2: "bar2b", foo3: "bar3"}]

hash_arr.reduce { |acc, h| (acc || {}).merge h }
# => {:foo2=>"bar2", :foo3=>"bar3", :foo=>"bar"}

Explanation

For those beginning with Ruby or functional programming, I hope this brief explanation might help understand what's happening here.

The reduce method when called on an Array object (hash_arr) will iterate through each element of the array with the returned value of the block being stored in an accumulator (acc). Effectively, the h parameter of my block will take on the value of each hash in the array, and the acc parameter will take on the value that is returned by the block through each iteration.

We use (acc || {}) to handle the initial condition where acc is nil. Note that the merge method gives priority to keys/values in the original hash. This is why the value of "bar2b" doesn't appear in my final hash.

Hope that helps!

3
  • 1
    Just because I happened to come across this. In reduce and inject the accumulator (or memo) is passed as the initial argument to the block rather than the final argument as this suggests (unlike each_with_object) – engineersmnky Mar 30 '18 at 2:53
  • Ah! Thank you @engineersmnky for noticing this. I've updated my answer! Great catch! – Matt Mar 30 '18 at 13:35
  • 1
    This helped me immensely. Thank you. – User_coder Jul 14 '19 at 23:26
5

To build upon @Oleg Afanasyev's answer, you can also do this neat trick:

h  = { a: 1 }
h2 = { b: 2 }
h3 = { c: 3 }

z = { **h, **h2, **h3 }  # => {:a=>1, :b=>2, :c=>3}

Cheers!

1
  • @CyrilDuchon-Doris Yes, that is a downside of this approach. – Tim Lowrimore Jul 10 '18 at 15:18
4
class Hash  
  def multi_merge(*args)
    args.unshift(self)
    args.inject { |accum, ele| accum.merge(ele) }
  end
end

That should do it. You could easily monkeypatch that into Hash as I have shown.

3
newHash = [h, h2, h3].each_with_object({}) { |oh, nh| nh.merge!(oh)}
# => {:a=>1, :b=>2, :c=>3}
2
  • The one thing @AGS is doing right here is using #merge! instead of #merge. #merge, alias #update, is significantly faster in this case. – Boris Stitnicky Oct 27 '13 at 23:48
  • Worked well for me since I believe most of the other methods described here don't work for Ruby v1.9 – CTS_AE Feb 19 '19 at 1:28
3

Here are the 2 monkeypatched ::Hash instance methods we use in our app. Backed by Minitest specs. They use merge! instead of merge internally, for performance reasons.

class ::Hash

  # Merges multiple Hashes together. Similar to JS Object.assign.
  #   Returns merged hash without modifying the receiver.
  #
  # @param *other_hashes [Hash]
  #
  # @return [Hash]
  def merge_multiple(*other_hashes)
    other_hashes.each_with_object(self.dup) do |other_hash, new_hash|
      new_hash.merge!(other_hash)
    end
  end

  # Merges multiple Hashes together. Similar to JS Object.assign.
  #   Modifies the receiving hash.
  #   Returns self.
  #
  # @param *other_hashes [Hash]
  #
  # @return [Hash]
  def merge_multiple!(*other_hashes)
    other_hashes.each(&method(:merge!))

    self
  end

end

Tests:

describe "#merge_multiple and #merge_multiple!" do
  let(:hash1) {{
    :a => "a",
    :b => "b"
  }}
  let(:hash2) {{
    :b => "y",
    :c => "c"
  }}
  let(:hash3) {{
    :d => "d"
  }}
  let(:merged) {{
    :a => "a",
    :b => "y",
    :c => "c",
    :d => "d"
  }}

  describe "#merge_multiple" do
    subject { hash1.merge_multiple(hash2, hash3) }

    it "should merge three hashes properly" do
      assert_equal(merged, subject)
    end

    it "shouldn't modify the receiver" do
      refute_changes(->{ hash1 }) do
        subject
      end
    end
  end

  describe "#merge_multiple!" do
    subject { hash1.merge_multiple!(hash2, hash3) }

    it "should merge three hashes properly" do
      assert_equal(merged, subject)
    end

    it "shouldn't modify the receiver" do
      assert_changes(->{ hash1 }, :to => merged) do
        subject
      end
    end
  end
end
2

Just for fun, you can do it also this way:

a = { a: 1 }, { b: 2 }, { c: 3 }
{}.tap { |h| a.each &h.method( :update ) }
#=> {:a=>1, :b=>2, :c=>3}

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