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As far as I understand, I should be able to use RSA to ensure authenticity or privacy, as I wish. In my case, I want to ensure authenticity so I encrypt the data with the private key and allow anyone to decrypt it with the public key. The data is not really secret but I need to guarantee that it was created by the owner of the public (and private) key.

When I try to decrypt using PyCrypto I get No private key error from PyCrypto. The code is this:

def _decrypt_rsa(decrypt_key_file, cipher_text):
    from Crypto.PublicKey import RSA
    from base64 import b64decode

    key = open(decrypt_key_file, "r").read()
    rsakey = RSA.importKey(key)
    raw_cipher_data = b64decode(cipher_text)
    decrypted = rsakey.decrypt(raw_cipher_data)
    return decrypted

I'm calling it with the path to the public key file (in OpenSSH format.) The encrypted data isn't generated by me and it was not done with Python but PHP. In PHP there's a openssl_public_decrypt function that decrypts this data easily.

Is it possible at all to decrypt using the public key with PyCrypto?

3
  • 2
    You have it reversed. Public key is used to encrypt and private key is used to decrypt.
    – jchysk
    Nov 20 '13 at 4:00
  • 1
    Public decrypt is the same as encrypt. Your problem can be fixed this way: decrypted = rsakey.encrypt(raw_cipher_data, 0)
    – 0x2b3bfa0
    Nov 8 '16 at 9:14
  • If the source really has encrypted with the private key, then they've effectively signed the data. Some tools, like Java, let you do this. To decrypt the signature you can use a public key (or the public part of a private key). See: stackoverflow.com/questions/48280670/… Jan 17 '18 at 9:59
7

That is totally insecure, because you are using raw RSA without padding.

Your application needs a signature, so you should not be dealing with encryptions and decryptions. For instance, PKCS#1 v1.5 is a good protocol, even though the signature is a piece of data that must be appended to what you want to prove the authenticity of.

To verify a PKCS#1 v1.5 signature in Python, you do:

from Crypto.PublicKey import RSA
from Crypto.Signature import PKCS1_v1_5
from Crypto.Hash import SHA

rsa_key = RSA.importKey(open(verification_key_file, "rb").read())
verifier = PKCS1_v1_5.new(rsa_key)
h = SHA.new(data_to_verify)
if verifier.verify(h, signature_received_with_the_data):
    print "OK"
else:
    print "Invalid"

I would strongly recommend to change the PHP code so that it creates such a signature.

3
  • Thanks for your suggestion, I'll no doubt consider it. Could you elaborate on what is insecure about using a public key to decrypt a non-secret piece of data to prove authenticity? Are you saying it can be spoofed because I don't have padding? Oct 24 '13 at 14:56
  • A person without the secret key is still able to forge something that looks like valid message coming from the real owner. That is due to the fact that RSA is a rather malleable algorithm if not combined with a proven padding. What you describe is really a signature with so-called full message recovery: one example is the ISO 9796-1 standard, which is completely broken. Oct 24 '13 at 17:08
  • shouldn't "import" be "importKey"? Feb 26 '14 at 20:23
1

Your function is correct. You just need to be giving it the path to your private key in order to decrypt instead of your public key. The public key is for encrypting, the private key is for decrypting.

def _decrypt_rsa(decrypt_key_file, cipher_text):
    '''
    Decrypt RSA encrypted package with private key
    :param decrypt_key_file: Private key
    :param cipher_text: Base64 encoded string to decrypt
    :return: String decrypted
    '''
    from Crypto.PublicKey import RSA
    from base64 import b64decode

    key = open(decrypt_key_file, "r").read()
    rsakey = RSA.importKey(key)
    #optionally could use OAEP
    #from Crypto.Cipher import PKCS1_OAEP
    #rsakey = PKCS1_OAEP.new(rsakey)
    raw_cipher_data = b64decode(cipher_text)
    decrypted = rsakey.decrypt(raw_cipher_data)
    return decrypted
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  • 1
    Then I would not be able to guarantee who encrypted the message. I ended up following the suggestion in the accepted answer and we moved to use signatures instead. Also, my problem was related to OAuth tokens and ultimately we moved to JWT, which uses signatures too. Jan 7 '16 at 17:08
  • Correct, you wouldn't be able to determine authenticity unless the person who sent it signed the message with their private key and you had their public key which you separately verified to be theirs. With JWT you can still use RSA for signing with an algorithm like RS512. If you're focused on ensuring the sender's authenticity you should focus on the issuer attribute.
    – jchysk
    Jan 7 '16 at 21:20
  • When I use this approach I get the error - TypeError("This is not a private key") @jchysk Nov 29 '19 at 9:12

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