6

I stumbled across this trick for getting a value from an anonymous inner class to a variable which is declared in the outer class. It works, but it feels like a dirty hack:

private int showDialog()
{
    final int[] myValue = new int[1];

    JPanel panel = new JPanel();
    final JDialog dialog = new JDialog(mainWindow, "Hit the button", true);
    dialog.setDefaultCloseOperation( WindowConstants.DO_NOTHING_ON_CLOSE );

    JButton button = new JButton("Hit me!");
    button.addActionListener(new ActionListener()
    {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
        {
            myValue[0] = 42;
            dialog.setVisible(false);
        }
    });

    panel.add(button);
    dialog.add(panel);
    dialog.pack();
    dialog.setVisible(true);

    return myValue[0];
}

(Yes, I realize this example could be replaced with a simple JOptionPane, but my actual dialogs are much more complicated.) The inner function insists that all variables it interacts with be final, but I can't declare the myValue as final because the inner function needs to assign it a value. Declaring it as a 1-element array gets around this problem, but seems like it might be a Bad ThingTM somehow. I'm wondering if a.) this is common practice or b.) there's any serious problems that could result from doing this.

3

If the code is legible, which it is, I wouldn't say doing it that way is terrible.

An alternative is to have the JButton call a function in the class that has showDialog (which is allowed). The function could set an instance variable that will be returned. But that seems less legible to me, so I'd actually prefer your method.

Unless you are making a deeply hierarchical UI framework, sometimes these little hacks are exactly the sort of thing you should do.

If you are concerned, you can do basically the same thing with a private inner class:

private class DialogReturnValue {
    public int value;
}

private int showDialog()
{
    final DialogReturnValue myValue = new DialogReturnValue();

    JPanel panel = new JPanel();
    final JDialog dialog = new JDialog(mainWindow, "Hit the button", true);
    dialog.setDefaultCloseOperation( WindowConstants.DO_NOTHING_ON_CLOSE );

    JButton button = new JButton("Hit me!");
    button.addActionListener(new ActionListener()
    {
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
        {
            myValue.value = 42;
            dialog.setVisible(false);
        }
    });

    panel.add(button);
    dialog.add(panel);
    dialog.pack();
    dialog.setVisible(true);

    return myValue.value;
}

And there's also ActionListeners to look at (which may well be the "right" approach).

  • If it were just the one, I could see doing this, but there are dozens of dialogs, each with different types of controls on them and different requirements for what they need to access. (The dialog methods themselves are actually mostly void return types.) I'd have to create a lot of those inner classes to cover all the things I'd need. My current method seems to require the least code. Just wanted to be sure it wouldn't break in some cases. (E.g. is it thread-safe? ActionListeners in general do bring up some multi-threading issues.) – Darrel Hoffman Oct 24 '13 at 3:23
  • isn't actionPerformed only called when the button is pressed or something? I don't see how the button would be pressed before showDialog returns. – newacct Oct 24 '13 at 6:46
  • As I understand it (and I may be not quite right here), creating and showing the JDialog causes the thread to basically lock at the dialog.setVisible(true) line until the JDialog is closed, which in this case can only happen when the button is pressed. All I know for sure is it works fine - the thread calling the showDialog() method stops running as long as the dialog is visible. – Darrel Hoffman Oct 24 '13 at 16:48
1

Using AtomicInteger or AtomicReference can make it little better. It is actually a common practice, but you can make it cleaner by introducing the actual class that implements ActionListener and provides the value through a getter.

0

That does seem dirty. I can't really speak to how "common" it is, and I don't know that you're risking world destruction by doing it, but if I needed something like this, I'd prefer to bite the bullet and write a full-fledged inner class (instead of the anonymous variety) to implement the ActionListener. That way you can have it affect its enclosing class's fields and call other methods in the enclosing class as needed. Depending on what exactly you're doing, it might even be worth it to just go all-in and subclass Dialog to hold this logic.

As a bonus, non-anonymous inner classes make debugging a bit less painful because you have more informative class identifiers available to you.

0

I don't think there is a problem with your code. I sometimes have to resort to something similar but I use a special class that wraps the value and I call a setter in the inner class but the end result is the same.

private static class Result{
   private Integer value;

   //getter and setters here

}

....

final Result result = new Result();

...
new InnerClass(){

   void foo(){
       result.setValue(42);
   }
}

The issue is that inner classes can only reference final variables since their memory address won't change.

My only advice to you is not to use an int[] as the value but an Integer[] so you can tell the difference between a value of 0 and the value not being set (which would have the value = null).

  • Good point on the int vs Integer thing, but in reality, there are many different types (not usually primitive) that are accessed by these dialogs, so that's a minor thing. Also, since in this case the dialog is modal and can't be closed without hitting the button, it's pretty much guaranteed not to be an issue. – Darrel Hoffman Oct 24 '13 at 0:27

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