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I have a private variable in my Student class defined as:

const int studentNumnber;

I am trying to write a copy constructor for the Student and I need to cast away the constness to do this. Unfortunately, I don't understand how to use std::const_cast.

This is what I am trying to do in my copy constructor:

    Student(const Student & s) 
        : Person(p.getName(), p.getEmailAddress(), p.getBirthDate()), school(0), studentNumber(0) {
        school = new char[strlen(s.school) + 1];
        strcpy_s(school, strlen(s.school) + 1, s.school);
        const_cast<int*>(this)->studentNumber = s.studentNumber;
        //studentNumber = s.studentNumber);
    }

That doesn't work... I am unsure of the syntax.

1

2 Answers 2

149

You are not allowed to const_cast and then modify variables that are actually const. This results in undefined behavior. const_cast is used to remove the const-ness from references and pointers that ultimately refer to something that is not const.

So, this is allowed:

int i = 0;
const int& ref = i;
const int* ptr = &i;

const_cast<int&>(ref) = 3;
*const_cast<int*>(ptr) = 3;

It's allowed because i, the object being assigned to, is not const. The below is not allowed:

const int i = 0;
const int& ref = i;
const int* ptr = &i;

const_cast<int&>(ref) = 3;
*const_cast<int*>(ptr) = 3;

because here i is const and you are modifying it by assigning it a new value. The code will compile, but its behavior is undefined (which can mean anything from "it works just fine" to "the program will crash".)

You should initialize constant data members in the constructor's initializers instead of assigning them in the body of constructors:

Student(const Student & s) 
    : Person(p.getName(), p.getEmailAddress(), p.getBirthDate()),
      school(0),
      studentNumber(s.studentNumber)
{
    // ...
}
9
  • 2
    "You should initialize data members..." not just const data
    – Caleth
    Commented Jan 24, 2019 at 11:26
  • What is the part that is not allowed about casting away constness from objects that are actually (defined) const? The cast itself, or the subsequent modification?
    – BeeOnRope
    Commented Feb 3, 2019 at 15:14
  • 29
    "You are not allowed to const_cast variables that are actually const" This is not true. Writing to such a variable has undefined behaviour, but the cast itself is 100% legal (but a bad idea because it creates the possibility to reach said UB!) Commented Feb 3, 2019 at 15:28
  • 8
    See stackoverflow.com/a/54504302/9204 for confirmation that this answer is wrong. Commented Sep 20, 2019 at 10:37
  • 5
    what's the point of language having a const_cast if it can result in undefined behavior? makes no sense. Commented Oct 5, 2019 at 16:20
-8

In your code you are trying cast this pointer instead of variable. You can try the following:

Student(const Student & s)
    : Person(p.getName(), p.getEmailAddress(), p.getBirthDate()), school(0), studentNumber(0) {
    school = new char[strlen(s.school) + 1];
    strcpy_s(school, strlen(s.school) + 1, s.school);
    *const_cast<int*>(&studentNumber) = s.studentNumber;
}

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