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The JPA spec differentiates between system exceptions and application exceptions. I am a bit confused about where the line is drawn exactly. My guesstimate:

An application exception is an exception that your code or libraries used by your code throw, explicitly or implicitly.

  • Does this include all exceptions, runtime and checked regardless the source?

A system exception is probably an exception thrown by the persistence provider. It certainly contains all subclasses of javax.persistence.PersistenceException.

  • What about other exceptions thrown by provider code?
  • What about exceptions thrown by other Java EE libraries?
  • Does it make a difference if the exception is wrapped in an EJBException?

How can I influence the behaviour by using the ApplicationException annotation? I have never seen it being used yet.

2 Answers 2

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An application exception shall be thrown when there is a business-logic error, as opposed to a system error.

There is an important difference: application exceptions do not automatically cause a transaction to rollback. The client has an opportunity to recover after an application exception is thrown.

Application exceptions are sent to the client without being repackaged as an EJBException. Therefore, you can use them to report validation errors or business logic problems, and they will reach the client.

Does this include all exceptions, runtime and checked regardless the source?

No. By default, application exceptions are the exceptions that do not extend RuntimeException or RemoteException. You can change this, as described below.

How can I influence the behaviour by using the ApplicationException annotation?

You can use @ApplicationException(rollback=true) if you want the transaction to be rolled back automatically.

You can also use the annotation on subclasses of RuntimeException and RemoteException, in order to avoid wrapping as EJBExceptions, and define their automatic rollback behavior.

What about exceptions thrown by other Java EE libraries?

They will follow the same rules, but you can use the XML descriptor to declare third party classes as application exceptions (with or without automatic rollback).

What about other exceptions thrown by provider code?

Not sure, I think you'd rarely see a non system error (Remote or Runtime exceptions) coming from provider code.

Does it make a difference if the exception is wrapped in an EJBException?

Yes. It will impact how you handle exceptions in the client code.

(Ref: Enterprise JavaBeans 3.0, Bill Burke, O'Reilly)

I hope it helps a bit.

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  • Very insightful. Thank you @jjmontes. Please let me reiterate one detail to see if I got it correctly: if my application code throws a RuntimeException and I dont take any precautions to avoid it (catching or annotating or otherwise configuring it), it will cause a transaction rollback and will surface wrapped in an EJBException?
    – kostja
    Commented Oct 24, 2013 at 11:07
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    Exactly. Which, in my opinion, is a great default behaviour and design. Because many time we have no control over RuntimeExceptions, and I guess 99,99% of the time, rolling back is what we want.
    – jjmontes
    Commented Oct 24, 2013 at 14:17
  • Following exception will not rollback the transaction, even it is a subclass of RuntimeException: @ApplicationException public class FooException extends RuntimeException { public FooException() { super(); } }
    – romsky
    Commented Aug 2, 2015 at 20:46
  • That seems correct to me. As you are annotating the class with @ApplicationException, it is treated as an ApplicationException and not rolling back automatically. You can use @ApplicationException(rollback=true)) if for some reason you need to. I have updated the response to the first question trying to add some clarity.
    – jjmontes
    Commented Aug 2, 2015 at 21:40
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I feel, I must add this very clear description, that Mahesh Desai gave on Coderanch :

Any exception that is a subclass of Exception, but not a subclass of RuntimeException and RemoteException, is an application exception. All the application exceptions are checked exceptions, So, when we call another method in our method that can throw an application exception, we must either declare it in the throws clause of the calling method or catch it in the body of the calling method or both.

All system exceptions are unchecked exceptions except RemoteExceptions and it can't be handled by the user.

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  • 2
    +1 A nicely concise explanation. I would add the @ApplicationException annotation for the sake of completeness.
    – kostja
    Commented Apr 28, 2014 at 14:35
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    Do you have a link to where this is said on Coderanch?
    – ThomasW
    Commented May 26, 2017 at 6:37

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