3

Why exactly does the latter case in Python doesn't yield the result 3.3?

>>> 1.0 + 2.3
3.3
>>> 1.1 + 2.2
3.3000000000000003

It doesn't seem to make any sense to me what is going on here. What are the limitations here for the representation of the same result that you are getting through 1.0 + 2.3 but not through 1.1 + 2.2?

3
9

To quote the documentation:

Unfortunately, most decimal fractions cannot be represented exactly as binary fractions. A consequence is that, in general, the decimal floating-point numbers you enter are only approximated by the binary floating-point numbers actually stored in the machine.

And what you have stumbled upon is one of many idiosyncrasies:

>>> 1.1 + 1.1
2.2
>>> 1.1 + 2.3
3.4
>>> 1.1 + 2.2
3.3000000000000003

In fact, its a rare one, I've had a hard time finding other occurrences. Here's another weird one:

>>> 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1 - 0.3
5.551115123125783e-17

Using Python's decimal class would give you better results.

7
  • or the decimal module – Ant Oct 24 '13 at 18:40
  • 2
    I gave you +1 but numpy is not a good solution here. numpy still uses binary floats. The decimal library would provide an exact solution here, as decimal operates exactly on decimal values. – steveha Oct 24 '13 at 18:41
  • I thought python just usually uses IEE754, and numpy probably, too. Could you give an example? Maybe you were thinking of e.g. sympy.mpmath. – Benjamin Bannier Oct 24 '13 at 18:41
  • 1
    +1 for 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.1 - 0.3 :) – JadedTuna Oct 24 '13 at 18:48
  • @steveha @Benjamin You guys are right. It was my mistake, I thought numpy had more precision, but that turns out to be not entirely true. Decimal is more precise, but its not all that precise either. – Games Brainiac Oct 25 '13 at 6:34

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