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While working on measurement.js, the joys of TDD helped me stumble upon a really strange (at least as i occurs to me) behaviour exposed in the javascript engines.

No matter if entered into the console or performed inside a script, this is what happens:

-1 + 0.85     --> -0.85               ✓  
-1 + 1        --> 0                   ✓   
-1 + 1 + -.15 --> 0.15                ✓
-1 + 1.15     --> 0.1499999999999999  ?!?

This is tested and reproduced exactly under following Browsers / OS's:

  • FF 24.0 (Debian 3.10)
  • Chrome 30.0.1599.114 (Debian 3.10)
  • Chrome 30.0.1599.101m (Win7SP1)
  • Internet Explorer 10.0.9200.16721 (Win7SP1)

As this is consistent throughout different vendors, i assume there must be a specific reason for this, so:

  • What is the reason for this?
  • What is the best practice to circumvent this behaviour, as it poses a problem for exact calculations with JS

Update:
Best lay-comprehensible explanation incl. answers and workarounds for multiple programming languages so far found at
http://floating-point-gui.de/ (thanx @RocketHazmat)

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  • Damn you IEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!! – Adam Rackis Oct 24 '13 at 19:04
  • Check out floating-point-gui.de – Rocket Hazmat Oct 24 '13 at 19:04
  • Not sure this is a duplicate as the OP is also asking the best practice to circumvent this behavior (however it should probably be worded differently then). – Jack Oct 24 '13 at 20:56
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No duh. You try doing the math in base two.

Short answer: you can't do it. It's like trying to add 1/3 in decimal repeatedly. You get 0.333333, then 0.666666, then 0.99999... but shouldn't that last one be 3/3, in other words 1?

To avoid this problem, just use integers for everything, as much as possible.

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  • +1, but just use integers for everything, as much as possible - was that a joke? Isn't the solution to use toFixed before presenting the results to the client? – Adam Rackis Oct 24 '13 at 19:06
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    "No duh. you try doing the math" - unhelpul, now i feel more stupid than before. "just use integers for everything" - so what you'd suggest as an integer representation of 1.15 ? – Philzen Oct 24 '13 at 19:07
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    @AdamRackis: That wasn't a joke. With money for example, do the math in "cents". Instead of doing 0.1+0.2, do 10+20, then convert to dollars later. (10+20)/100 => 0.3 – Rocket Hazmat Oct 24 '13 at 19:07
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    @Philzen: Times it by 100, do the math, then divide by 100. (-100 + 115)/100 => 1.5. Or use toFixed: (-1 + 1.15).toFixed(2). – Rocket Hazmat Oct 24 '13 at 19:11
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    @Philzen: Check out this page: floating-point-gui.de It should explain it. – Rocket Hazmat Oct 24 '13 at 19:16
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I think this is because of the problems inherent in representing some floating point numbers in binary.

Read this:- What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic.

Try to use toFixed to avoid your problem

Formats a number using fixed-point notation.

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