168

This will be my first git use. I have added new files ( a lot ) to the folder/project ( git local repository).

I went through online tutorials and forums and see i can do

git commit -a

So I go to the base folder of the repository and do a

sudo git commit -a

But then, some screens comes up and asks me to add a comment which i do. i do not know how to proceed or exit. I do not want to mess up so i did ctrl + Z and did not do anything.

Can you guys please outline the commands I need to use?

git commit -a 

and

git push?
6
  • 1
    git commit -a opens up an editor for you to type commit message. Enter a message you want to see as log and exit the editor. This completes the commit. Follow that up by pushing your changes to remote repository using git push <remote name> <branch name> such as git push remote master
    – Bhaskar
    Oct 24, 2013 at 20:41
  • 3
    also note, you don't need to (and shouldn't) use sudo
    – dax
    Oct 24, 2013 at 20:43
  • Thanks for the reply.If i do not use sudo i get permission denied error.
    – kishore .
    Oct 24, 2013 at 20:47
  • 2
    Having used sudo previously, you probably have files in your working directory that are now mistakenly owned by root. At this point doing other operations without sudo will cause a permission denied error because you can't change those files owned by root. Your repository might be a bit of a mess and it might be best to start over (and don't use sudo). Oct 24, 2013 at 20:49
  • if you want to add all files you can use ` git add -a ` .But if you want to add multiple selected files. you can use ` git add -i ' . please refer this git-scm.com/book/en/v2/Git-Tools-Interactive-Staging . this will help you . Sep 17, 2016 at 6:27

13 Answers 13

502

Use the git add command, followed by a list of space-separated filenames.

git add file-1 file-2 file-3

Include paths and .extensions, e.g.

git add images/logo.png scripts/app.js
3
  • 7
    This doesn't work when one of the file name includes a whitespace with git 1.9.5 Nov 22, 2017 at 6:25
  • very helpful for me Aug 12, 2020 at 23:02
  • This was very helpful for me; thanks. Dec 15, 2021 at 1:39
149

To add all the changes you've made:

git add .

To commit them:

git commit -m "MY MESSAGE HERE" #-m is the message flag

You can put those steps together like this:

git commit -a -m "MY MESSAGE HERE"

To push your committed changes from your local repository to your remote repository:

git push origin master

You might have to type in your username/password for github after this. Here's a good primer on using git. A bit old, but it covers what's going on really well.

4
  • Will -a add new (unstaged) files before the commit?
    – SabreWolfy
    Jul 12, 2016 at 12:23
  • git commit -a is shorthand for git commit --all, so yes, it will.
    – dax
    Jul 12, 2016 at 15:15
  • 1
    $ man git-commit includes this for -a: "Tell the command to automatically stage files that have been modified and deleted, but new files you have not told Git about are not affected.", which is why I asked.
    – SabreWolfy
    Jul 13, 2016 at 13:42
  • For completeness the easiest way to add multiple files of one type is using the asterisk, for example for html use "git add *.html"
    – Inyoka
    Jan 27, 2017 at 5:51
52

As some have mentioned a possible way is using git interactive staging. This is great when you have files with different extensions

$ git add -i
           staged     unstaged path
  1:    unchanged        +0/-1 TODO
  2:    unchanged        +1/-1 index.html
  3:    unchanged        +5/-1 lib/simplegit.rb

*** Commands ***
  1: status     2: update      3: revert     4: add untracked
  5: patch      6: diff        7: quit       8: help
What now>

If you press 2 then enter you will get a list of available files to be added:

What now> 2
           staged     unstaged path
  1:    unchanged        +0/-1 TODO
  2:    unchanged        +1/-1 index.html
  3:    unchanged        +5/-1 lib/simplegit.rb
Update>>

Now you just have to insert the number of the files you want to add, so if we wanted to add TODO and index.html we would type 1,2

Update>> 1,2
           staged     unstaged path
* 1:    unchanged        +0/-1 TODO
* 2:    unchanged        +1/-1 index.html
  3:    unchanged        +5/-1 lib/simplegit.rb
Update>>

You see the * before the number? that means that the file was added.

Now imagine that you have 7 files and you want to add them all except the 7th? Sure we could type 1,2,3,4,5,6 but imagine instead of 7 we have 16, that would be quite cumbersome, the good thing we don't need to type them all because we can use ranges,by typing 1-6

Update>> 1-6
           staged     unstaged path
* 1:    unchanged        +0/-1 TODO
* 2:    unchanged        +1/-1 index.html
* 3:    unchanged        +5/-1 lib/simplegit.rb
* 4:    unchanged        +5/-1 file4.html
* 5:    unchanged        +5/-1 file5.html
* 6:    unchanged        +5/-1 file6.html
  7:    unchanged        +5/-1 file7.html
Update>>

We can even use multiple ranges, so if we want from 1 to 3 and from 5 to 7 we type 1-3, 5-7:

Update>> 1-3, 5-7
           staged     unstaged path
* 1:    unchanged        +0/-1 TODO
* 2:    unchanged        +1/-1 index.html
* 3:    unchanged        +5/-1 lib/simplegit.rb
  4:    unchanged        +5/-1 file4.html
* 5:    unchanged        +5/-1 file5.html
* 6:    unchanged        +5/-1 file6.html
* 7:    unchanged        +5/-1 file7.html
Update>>

We can also use this to unstage files, if we type -number, so if we wanted to unstage file number 1 we would type -1:

Update>> -1
           staged     unstaged path
  1:    unchanged        +0/-1 TODO
* 2:    unchanged        +1/-1 index.html
* 3:    unchanged        +5/-1 lib/simplegit.rb
  4:    unchanged        +5/-1 file4.html
* 5:    unchanged        +5/-1 file5.html
* 6:    unchanged        +5/-1 file6.html
* 7:    unchanged        +5/-1 file7.html
Update>>

And as you can imagine we can also unstage a range of files, so if we type -range all the files on that range would be unstaged. If we wanted to unstage all the files from 5 to 7 we would type -5-7:

Update>> -5-7
           staged     unstaged path
  1:    unchanged        +0/-1 TODO
* 2:    unchanged        +1/-1 index.html
* 3:    unchanged        +5/-1 lib/simplegit.rb
  4:    unchanged        +5/-1 file4.html
  5:    unchanged        +5/-1 file5.html
  6:    unchanged        +5/-1 file6.html
  7:    unchanged        +5/-1 file7.html
Update>>
3
  • 4
    personally i like to this way. it is easy to use when you have more files to commit and other operations. Sep 17, 2016 at 6:29
  • Once you ended, how do you finish the interactive staging?
    – Cris
    Feb 12, 2020 at 1:01
  • 2
    @Crparedes once you have added the files, if you press enter again it goes back to the menu, then you have to choose option 7 to quit from interactive staging. Feb 12, 2020 at 11:01
33

You can also select multiple files like this

git add folder/subfolder/*

This will add all the files in the specified subfolder. Very useful when you edit a bunch of files but you just want to commit some of them...

1
  • saved me 10 seconds + thousands to come in the future
    – candyline
    Aug 21, 2020 at 1:42
15

If you want to add multiple files in a given folder you can split them using {,}. This is awesome for not repeating long paths, e.g.

git add long/path/{file1,file2,...,filen}

Beware not to put spaces between the ,.

2
  • what is long/path/ here? @EliuX Jun 30, 2017 at 6:36
  • long/path could be a path string with a very long length, so its more comfortable not repeat such part, without having to cd into it
    – EliuX
    Jun 30, 2017 at 17:40
9

Simply use single quotations around each file name to ensure any with spaces work as expected

git add 'file1' 'file2' 'file3' 
4

When you change files or add a new ones in repository you first must stage them.

git add <file>

or if you want to stage all

git add .

By doing this you are telling to git what files you want in your next commit. Then you do:

git commit -m 'your message here'

You use

git push origin master

where origin is the remote repository branch and master is your local repository branch.

2
  • Thank you!. On the last command git push origin master. I am actually working on a different branch name ( which was created from the master branch). SO do i need to eneter my branch name or origin master. Thanks again
    – kishore .
    Oct 24, 2013 at 20:50
  • No problem.:) Yes, you should use your branch names, origin master are just examples.
    – somi
    Oct 24, 2013 at 20:59
3

👉 step1.

git init

👉 step2.

a) for all files

git add -a

b) only specific folder

git add <folder1> <folder2> <etc.>

👉 step3.

git commit -m "Your message about the commit"

👉 step4.

enter image description here

git remote add origin https://github.com/yourUsername/yourRepository.git

👉 step5.

git push -u origin master
git push origin master

if you are face this error than

 ! [rejected]        master -> master (fetch first)
error: failed to push some refs to 'https://github.com/harishkumawat2610/Qt5-with-C-plus-plus.git'
hint: Updates were rejected because the remote contains work that you do
hint: not have locally. This is usually caused by another repository pushing
hint: to the same ref. You may want to first integrate the remote changes
hint: (e.g., 'git pull ...') before pushing again.
hint: See the 'Note about fast-forwards' in 'git push --help' for details.

👉 Use this command

git push --force origin master
3

To add all the changes you've made:

git add .

To add single folder:

git add directory path

To add multiple folders:

git add folder1 folder2 folder3 foldern

To commit all the changes:

git commit -m "message"

To push your committed changes from your local repository to your remote repository:

git push origin branch name
1
  • 1
    Just wanted to add that wildcards are accepted: git add *.py to add all python files. Jun 11, 2021 at 12:09
1

It sounds like git is launching your editor (probably vi) so that you can type a commit message. If you are not familiar with vi, it is easy to learn the basics. Alternatives are:

  • Use git commit -a -m "my first commit message" to specify the commit message on the command line (using this will not launch an editor)

  • Set the EDITOR environment variable to an editor that you are familiar with

1
  • Thanks a lot everybody who replied. I successfully committed and pushed my files.
    – kishore .
    Oct 24, 2013 at 21:38
1

If you want to stage and commit all your files on Github do the following;

git add -A                                                                                
git commit -m "commit message"
git push origin master
0

Try this:

git add file1
git commit file1
git push 
git add file2
git commit file2 --amend
git push 

Note: git commit without -m option will open an editor for your commit message.

0

I use the command: git add *CMakeLists.txt, in order to add all the CmakeLists.txt files across the sub-directories:

z:\Temp\proj_I2.21.09.24\CMakeLists.txt
z:\Temp\proj_I2.21.09.24\tools\t1\src\CMakeLists.txt
z:\Temp\proj_I2.21.09.24\tools\TAF\VV\CMakeLists.txt
z:\Temp\proj_I2.21.09.24\tools\TAF\Executable\CMakeLists.txt
z:\Temp\proj_I2.21.09.24\tools\TAF\Recording\CMakeLists.txt
z:\Temp\proj_I2.21.09.24\Design\original\CMakeLists.txt

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