9

I'm working on creating an API that has nested lists. Jackson seems like a great tool to create objects, but I can't quite figure out how to nest a list, and I'm wondering if its possible.

My object looks like this.

public class Order {
    public String name;
    public List<Item> items;
}

I'm hoping there is a way to map it to json that looks something like:

{
    name : "A name"
    items : { 
        elements : [{
            price : 30
        }]
    }
}

We want to be able to do this so we can add properties to lists.

7

You can write custom deserializer for List<Item> items. See below example:

class ItemsJsonDeserializer extends JsonDeserializer<List<Item>> {

    @Override
    public List<Item> deserialize(JsonParser jp, DeserializationContext ctxt) throws IOException, JsonProcessingException {
        InnerItems innerItems = jp.readValueAs(InnerItems.class);

        return innerItems.elements;
    }

    private static class InnerItems {
        public List<Item> elements;
    }
}

Now, you have to inform Jackson to use it for your property. You can do this in this way:

public class Order {
  public String name;
  @JsonDeserialize(using = ItemsJsonDeserializer.class)
  public List<Item> items;
}
  • Hah, this is what I was thinking of, but didn't find it in the jackson-annotations javadocs (it's in jackson-databind). – vanza Oct 25 '13 at 16:50
  • The member type InnerItems cannot be declared static; static types can only be declared in static or top level types – coltonfranco Feb 6 '17 at 17:52
3

In general it is best to map JSON structure exactly to Java. In your case you could use something like:

public class Order {
  public String name;
  public ItemList items;
}

public class ItemList {
  public List<Item> elements;

  // and any properties you might want...
}

alternatively, you could probably also use (relatively) new @JsonFormat annotation:

public class Order {
  public String name;
  public ItemList items;
}

// annotation can be used on propery or class
@JsonFormat(shape=Shape.OBJECT) // instead of Shape.ARRAY
public class ItemList extends ArrayList<Item>
{
   public Iterator<Item> getElements() { return this.iterator(); }

   public String getSomeAttribute() { ... }
}

where you are forcing List or Collection to be serialized as if it was POJO, instead of normal special handling. There may be some side-effects, since introspection is used to find possible accessors, but the general approach should work

  • I know this is an old post, but this solution helped me ~Thanks – Dustin Falgout Sep 4 '14 at 17:17
1

Your JSON translates to: "the object named items is of a type that has a property named elements which is a list of some sort".

So your Item class just needs an elements property:

class Item {
    List<Something> getElements();
}

Note that your Java code doesn't map to your JSON. Your Java classes would map to something like:

{
    "name" : "foo",
    "items" : [
        { /* encoded version of Item */ }
    ]
}
  • Yes. A one to one mapping would work out of the box with Jackson. I am trying to create this nesting on the response without adding complexity to my java objects. – Josh Wilson Oct 25 '13 at 4:10
  • 1
    Then I don't understand your question. You want a list on the JSON encoding but no list in the source data? How so? It sounds like you're trying to do something like this question is talking about, but that sounds like a lot of trouble. – vanza Oct 25 '13 at 4:16
  • BTW another thing you can look at is the com.fasterxml.jackson.databind.Module class, which allows you to create custom serializers for types; don't know if you can override the serializer for List/Collection/etc, but it might be a start. – vanza Oct 25 '13 at 4:26
  • Yes, it is possible to override handles for all types, including List and Collection. But for that SimpleModule isn't enough; need a custom Serializers implementation for structured types. – StaxMan Oct 27 '13 at 23:15

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