32

I have a dataframe with an NA row:

 df = data.frame(c("classA", NA, "classB"), t(data.frame(rep("A", 5), rep(NA, 5), rep("B", 5))))
 rownames(df) <- c(1,2,3)
 colnames(df) <- c("class", paste("Year", 1:5, sep = ""))

 > df
   class Year1 Year2 Year3 Year4 Year5
1 classA     A     A     A     A     A
2   <NA>  <NA>  <NA>  <NA>  <NA>  <NA>
3 classB     B     B     B     B     B

I introduced the empty row (NA row) on purpose because I wanted to have some space between classA row and classB row.

Now, I would like to substitute the <NA> by blank, so that the second row looks like an empty row.

I tried:

 df[is.na(df)] <- ""

and

 df[df == "NA"] <- ""

but it didn't work..

Any ideas? Thanks!

  • Your first attempt works just fine for me. What about it didn't work? – joran Oct 25 '13 at 14:38
  • I still see <NA> in the dataframe, the code doesn't seem to affect anything – Mayou Oct 25 '13 at 14:38
  • 1
    It to do with factors (of course!)... try str(df) (I jumped the gun on my answer!) – Simon O'Hanlon Oct 25 '13 at 14:39
  • 4
    By the way, never just say "it didn't work". You neglected to mention the six (!) warning messages you surely received upon running that code. The warning message should have been awfully suggestive, don't you think? – joran Oct 25 '13 at 14:42
  • 2
    The brackets around the <NA> indicate that they are not strings. Have a look HERE for more info. – Ricardo Saporta Oct 25 '13 at 14:45
40

Another alternative:

df <- sapply(df, as.character) # since your values are `factor`
df[is.na(df)] <- 0

If you want blanks instead of zeroes

> df <- sapply(df, as.character)
> df[is.na(df)] <- " "
> df
     class    Year1 Year2 Year3 Year4 Year5
[1,] "classA" "A"   "A"   "A"   "A"   "A"  
[2,] " "      " "   " "   " "   " "   " "  
[3,] "classB" "B"   "B"   "B"   "B"   "B"  

If you want a data.frame, then just use as.data.drame

> as.data.frame(df)
   class Year1 Year2 Year3 Year4 Year5
1 classA     A     A     A     A     A
2                                     
3 classB     B     B     B     B     B
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I thought " " is space and "" is blank. Am i right? – RanonKahn Apr 29 at 17:31
10

This answer is more of an extended comment.

What you're trying to do isn't what I would consider good practice. R is not, say, Excel, so doing something like this just to create visual separation in your data is just going to give you a headache later on down the line.

If you really only cared about the visual output, I can offer two suggestions:

  1. Use the na.print argument to print when you want to view the data with that visual separation.

    print(df, na.print = "")
    #    class Year1 Year2 Year3 Year4 Year5
    # 1 classA     A     A     A     A     A
    # 2                                     
    # 3 classB     B     B     B     B     B
    
  2. Realize that even the above is not the best suggestion. Get both visual and content separation by converting your data.frame to a list:

    split(df, df$class)
    # $classA
    #    class Year1 Year2 Year3 Year4 Year5
    # 1 classA     A     A     A     A     A
    # 
    # $classB
    #    class Year1 Year2 Year3 Year4 Year5
    # 3 classB     B     B     B     B     B
    
| improve this answer | |

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