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This question already has an answer here:

EDIT: So it turns out what I had before was correct, I was simply counting the indexes wrong. Thank you for your input though.

Working on a method that finds all substring indices in a given string from the user. I am having issues with getting correct positions from userString.IndexOf. I know it's finding all occurrences of the substring, but the integer index is off by a substantial amount.

private static void getSubStringPositions(string userString, string userSubString)
{
    string subStringPositions = "";
    int position = 0;

    if (userString.IndexOf(userSubString, position) == -1)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Your sub-string was not found in your string.\n");
        return;
    }
    while (position < userString.Length)
    {
        position += userString.IndexOf(userSubString, position);
        subStringPositions += Convert.ToString(position) + ", ";
    }

    Console.WriteLine("The occurernce(s) for your sub-string are: " + subStringPositions + "\n\n");
    return;
}

I think it may be an issue with position += userString.IndexOf(userSubString, position); but am not entirely sure how I would go about setting the new start position while maintaing an accurate record of the substring locations.

marked as duplicate by cheesemacfly, Henk Holterman, Drew McGowen, user1864610, Godeke Oct 26 '13 at 5:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    The found position is relative to the base string, not to the starting position. – Henk Holterman Oct 25 '13 at 18:09
4

Remove the += in front of position

   position = userString.IndexOf(userSubString, position);

Also you should change your code to save the initial found position and set the position variable to search after the previous one

    // Initial check...
    position = userString.IndexOf(userSubString);
    if(position == -1)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Your sub-string was not found in your string.\n");
        return;
    }
    // Save the found position and enter the loop
    subStringPositions = Convert.ToString(position) + ", ";

    while (position < userString.Length)
    {
        // Search restart from the character after the previous found substring
        position = userString.IndexOf(userSubString, position + 1);
        subStringPositions += Convert.ToString(position) + ", ";
    }

As a final note, if this search produces many hits it is better to change the string concatenation using a StringBuilder class instance

    StringBuilder subStringPositions = new StringBuilder();
    subStringPositions.Append(Convert.ToString(position) + ", ");

    while (position < userString.Length)
    {
        // Search restart from the character after the previous found substring
        position = userString.IndexOf(userSubString, position + 1);
        subStringPositions.Append(Convert.ToString(position) + ", ";
    }
    Console.WriteLine("The occurrence(s) for your sub-string are: " + 
                      subStringPositions.ToString() + "\n\n");
  • Gave me the clarification that I needed. Thank you very much for your time. – Harley Benoit Oct 25 '13 at 19:03
2

A concise way to find these indexes using LINQ:

public static IEnumerable<int> FindIndexes(string text, string query)
{
    return Enumerable.Range(0, text.Length - query.Length)
        .Where(i => query.Equals(text.Substring(i, query.Length));
}

FindIndexes("abcbcbc", "bcb") will find you the indexes 1 and 3.

1

You have another problem here. Let's say you call:

getSubStringPositions("abcabcabcabc", "abcabc");

You function will incorrectly report that the string occurs twice, when in fact the substring occurs 3 times, like so:

  • abcabc.abcabc
  • abc.abcabc.abc <-- your function jumps over this one
  • abcabc.abcabc.

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