93

What is the efficient(probably vectorized with Matlab terminology) way to generate random number of zeros and ones with a specific proportion? Specially with Numpy?

As my case is special for 1/3, my code is:

import numpy as np 
a=np.mod(np.multiply(np.random.randomintegers(0,2,size)),3)

But is there any built-in function that could handle this more effeciently at least for the situation of K/N where K and N are natural numbers?

12
  • 2
    Do you need the proportion to be exactly the given value, or is that just the expected proportion of the sample? Commented Oct 25, 2013 at 19:11
  • Also, what should happen for the 1/3 case when size is not divisible by 3? Exception? Round/floor/trunc? Weighted random round (so 10 has a 2/3 chance of 3 and a 1/3 chance of 4)?
    – abarnert
    Commented Oct 25, 2013 at 19:15
  • @WarrenWeckesser, its the expected proportion in my case. I wished you didn't deleter your answer so I would have accepted it.
    – Cupitor
    Commented Oct 25, 2013 at 19:16
  • 1
    @Naji: I restored my answer. If you had needed the exact proportion, that method wouldn't work. Commented Oct 25, 2013 at 19:27
  • 1
    @Naji: Whatever you want? I wanted it to generate a trillion dollars, and all it gave me was an array. I suppose I'm not believing hard enough. ;)
    – abarnert
    Commented Oct 25, 2013 at 20:15

7 Answers 7

131

Yet another approach, using np.random.choice:

>>> np.random.choice([0, 1], size=(10,), p=[1./3, 2./3])
array([0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0])
4
  • 14
    note that this approach will not give you the exact proportion of zeros and ones you request . . . the answer by @mdml below will.
    – abcd
    Commented Aug 14, 2018 at 17:21
  • true, and since it is accepted, I think Cupitor might have added a bug to his program
    – JFFIGK
    Commented Dec 2, 2019 at 4:16
  • 1
    @JFFIGK, dbliss: this was discussed in the comments to the question. Those comments are still there, so take a look. Commented Dec 3, 2019 at 15:25
  • Since the mentioned link is broken, see: numpy.random.choice. Commented Mar 10, 2022 at 16:35
51

A simple way to do this would be to first generate an ndarray with the proportion of zeros and ones you want:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> N = 100
>>> K = 30 # K zeros, N-K ones
>>> arr = np.array([0] * K + [1] * (N-K))
>>> arr
array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,
       0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1])

Then you can just shuffle the array, making the distribution random:

>>> np.random.shuffle(arr)
>>> arr
array([1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0,
       1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,
       0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1,
       1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1])

Note that this approach will give you the exact proportion of zeros/ones you request, unlike say the binomial approach. If you don't need the exact proportion, then the binomial approach will work just fine.

2
  • How stupid of me! Right I forgot about binary distribution. Actually somebody posted binary right before you but he deleted his answer(dont know why!!)
    – Cupitor
    Commented Oct 25, 2013 at 19:13
  • 1
    This is quite clever
    – mxmlnkn
    Commented Jun 15, 2019 at 9:20
23

If I understand your problem correctly, you might get some help with numpy.random.shuffle

>>> def rand_bin_array(K, N):
    arr = np.zeros(N)
    arr[:K]  = 1
    np.random.shuffle(arr)
    return arr

>>> rand_bin_array(5,15)
array([ 0.,  1.,  0.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,  1.,  0.,  0.,  0.,
        0.,  0.])
22

You can use numpy.random.binomial. E.g. suppose frac is the proportion of ones:

In [50]: frac = 0.15

In [51]: sample = np.random.binomial(1, frac, size=10000)

In [52]: sample.sum()
Out[52]: 1567
3
  • 3
    This doesn't guarantee the correct proportion of ones like mdml's answer does.
    – Epimetheus
    Commented Dec 3, 2019 at 13:56
  • @John, this was discussed in the comments to the question. Take a look. Commented Dec 3, 2019 at 15:22
  • I see now! Of course the question needs editing then as it asks for specific proportion.
    – Epimetheus
    Commented Dec 4, 2019 at 11:07
1

Another way of getting the exact number of ones and zeroes is to sample indices without replacement using np.random.choice:

arr_len = 30
num_ones = 8

arr = np.zeros(arr_len, dtype=int)
idx = np.random.choice(range(arr_len), num_ones, replace=False)
arr[idx] = 1

Out:

arr

array([0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1,
       0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0])
1

Simple one-liner: you can avoid using lists of integers and probability distributions, which are unintuitive and overkill for this problem in my opinion, by simply working with bools first and then casting to int if necessary (though leaving it as a bool array should work in most cases).

>>> import numpy as np
>>> np.random.random(9) < 1/3.
array([False,  True,  True,  True,  True, False, False, False, False])   
>>> (np.random.random(9) < 1/3.).astype(int)
array([0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1])    
2
  • This doesn't guarantee the correct proportion of ones like mdml's answer does.
    – Epimetheus
    Commented Dec 3, 2019 at 13:57
  • The OP said they wanted 1/3 to be the expected proportion of 1s, not the exact proportion. Commented Dec 3, 2019 at 21:37
0

You can generate a nd-array with random binary members (0 and 1) directly in one line through the following method. You can also use np.random.random() instead of np.random.uniform().

>>import numpy as np
>>np.array([[round(np.random.uniform()) for i in range(3)] for j in  range(3)])
array([[1, 0, 0],
       [1, 1, 1],
       [0, 1, 0]])
>>

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