6

How can I convert an array of 6 integers into a single integer. Example provided below of what I want to do.

Array: {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6}

Integer: 123456

Thank you!

  • Do you realize that this will not be possible if the 6 integers in the array are too big? – Stefano Sanfilippo Oct 25 '13 at 21:02
  • 1
    What have you tried? Also, if you get that far, you'll find that the leading zero will disappear: in your example, for instance, the integer will be 123456. This happens for good reason and should not alarm you. – Reinstate Monica -- notmaynard Oct 25 '13 at 21:03
  • Yes, assuming they are not too big. – Rob Johnson Oct 25 '13 at 21:03
  • 7
    So you mean an array of digits? Let me tell you, how the decimal system works: Value=digit(n)+10*digit(n-1)+100*digit(n-2)+...+10^n*digit(0) – Eugen Rieck Oct 25 '13 at 21:04
  • 2
    Beware arithmetic overflow. – Netherwire Oct 25 '13 at 21:15
14

Try this:

int i, k = 0;
for (i = 0; i < n; i++)
    k = 10 * k + a[i];

where n is the length of the array. This is true, however, when the array is short enough otherwise you would get an int overflow.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    int a[]={1,3,5,234,1,5,3}; Bounds were not mentioned, but could be a problem :) – ryyker Oct 25 '13 at 22:09
1

Here is a function I made

int array_to_num(int arr[],int n){
    char str[6][3];
    int i;
    char number[13] = {'\n'};

    for(i=0;i<n;i++) sprintf(str[i],"%d",arr[i]);
    for(i=0;i<n;i++)strcat(number,str[i]);

    i = atoi(number);
    return i;
} 

where str[6][3] means there are 6 elements that can hold 2 digit numbers, change it to suit your needs better. Also n is the size of the array you put into the function. Use it like this:

int num[6] = {13,20,6,4,3,55};
int real_num;
real_num = array_to_num(num,6);

real_num will now be 132064355

| improve this answer | |
  • What about arithmetic overflow? – CinCout Sep 23 '15 at 6:02
0
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char ** argv){
    int n;
    char buff[100];

    sprintf(buff,"%d%d%d%d%d%d%d", 0, 1,2, 3, 4, 5, 6);
    n = atoi(buff);

    printf("the number is %d",n);

}

another version

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char ** argv){
    int n;
    int i;
    char buff[100];
    int x[]={0,1,2,3,4,5,6};
    for (i=0; i<7; i++) {
        sprintf(&buff[i],"%d",x[i]);
    }
    n = atoi(buff);

    printf("the number is %d",n);

}
| improve this answer | |
0

Be aware that the range of integer values are: –2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647.
Any list of numbers in an array (such as what you are describing) will need something bigger than an int to hold value for which the number of digits representing that value is greater than 10, and then, the first digit can only be 2 or less, and so on... (if you want more digits, use __int64)

This will return an integer comprised of the elements of an int array...

(note, things like negative values are not accounted for here)

#include <ansi_c.h>
int ConcatInts(int *a, int numInts);
int main(void)
{
    int a;
    int m[]={1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};
    int size = sizeof(m)/sizeof(m[0]);

    a = ConcatInts(m, size); //a = 123456789

    return 0;   
}

int ConcatInts(int *a, int numInts)
{
    int i=0, size;
    int b=0;
    int mult = 1;
    size = sizeof(a)/sizeof(a[0]);
    for(i=0;i<numInts;i++)
    {
        if((a[i] < 0) ||(a[i]>9)) return -1;
        if(i==0)
        {
            b += a[i];
        }
        else
        {
            b *= 10;
            b += a[i];
        }
    }
    return b;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • The special case test if (i==0) is not necessary, since b starts out as 0 and so 10*b is also 0. More important: you cannot use sizeof on an array pointer. Fortunately, it just adds dead code. – usr2564301 Oct 26 '13 at 0:18
0

Maybe convert the array values into a string and then cast to an Int when necessary? Of course, being aware of limits, as already mentioned.

| improve this answer | |
0
    #include <stdio.h>

    char* arr2str(int arr[], int size) {
        static char buffer[256];
        memset(&buffer[0], 0, sizeof(buffer)/sizeof(char));
        char *ptr = &buffer[0];
        for(int i=0; i<size; ++i) {
            sprintf(ptr += strlen(ptr), "%d", arr[i]);
        }
        return buffer;
    }

    int arr2int(int arr[], int size) {
        char buffer[256] = {0,};
        char *ptr = &buffer[0];
        for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
            sprintf(ptr += strlen(ptr), "%d", arr[i]);
        }
        return atoi(&buffer[0]);
    }

    int main(int argc, const char * argv[]) {

        int arr[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,0};
        int size = sizeof(arr) / sizeof(int);
        char *str = arr2str(arr, size);
        int num = arr2int(arr, size);
        printf("%s, %d", str, num);
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • A rather complicated solution for an easy task answered long ago... This part is weird: sizeof(buffer)/sizeof(char) It is useless to divide as sizeof(char) is always 1. If it wasn't, the division would simply be wrong. You use duplicate code which isn't even identical for the same task. Why don't you just call arr2str from within arr2int? Or better, skip the step using a string when you only need the integer value. – Gerhardh Aug 1 '18 at 7:04
0
int k = 0;
for (int i = A.length; i > 0; i--){
    k += 10 * i * A[A.length - i];
}
| improve this answer | |
0

try this one:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int main()
{
    int arr[] = {1, 2, 2, 43, 4, 27};
    int size = sizeof(arr)/sizeof(arr[0]);
    int n = 0;
    int number  = 0;
    int val  = 0;
    while(n <size)
    {
        val = arr[n];
        while(val!= 0)
        {
            val = val/10;
            number = number*10;
        }
        number = number + arr[n];
        n++;
    }
    printf("%d", number);
    return 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Why not just convert each item in the int[] to a string, and add the strings together, and then convert that back into an integer

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the idea. But it would be better to put this as a comment for the question – mohammad javad ahmadi Sep 22 at 4:57

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