1645

I have an array of numbers that I need to make sure are unique. I found the code snippet below on the internet and it works great until the array has a zero in it. I found this other script here on Stack Overflow that looks almost exactly like it, but it doesn't fail.

So for the sake of helping me learn, can someone help me determine where the prototype script is going wrong?

Array.prototype.getUnique = function() {
 var o = {}, a = [], i, e;
 for (i = 0; e = this[i]; i++) {o[e] = 1};
 for (e in o) {a.push (e)};
 return a;
}

More answers from duplicate question:

Similar question:

  • 3
    @hippietrail That older question is about finding and returning only the duplicates (I was confused too!). My question is more about why this function fails when an array has a zero in it. – Mottie Feb 12 '14 at 17:34
  • You probably want to make your question title less vague too. – hippietrail Feb 12 '14 at 17:38
  • For future readers, when start finding that you have to algorithmically modify the contents of your data structure all the time, (order them, remove repeating elements, etc.) or search for elements inside it at every iteration, it's safe to assume that you're using the wrong data structure in the first place and start using one that is more appropriate for the task at hand (in this case a hash set instead of array). – nurettin Dec 30 '14 at 11:16
  • I copied the code from somewhere else, a loooong time ago... but it seems pretty straight-forward: o = object, a = array, i = index and e = umm, something :P – Mottie Aug 4 '15 at 12:38
  • Possible duplicate of How to get unique values in an array – Adeel Imran Dec 25 '17 at 19:36

97 Answers 97

7

It appears we have lost Rafael's answer, which stood as the accepted answer for a few years. This was (at least in 2017) the best-performing solution if you don't have a mixed-type array:

Array.prototype.getUnique = function(){
    var u = {}, a = [];
    for (var i = 0, l = this.length; i < l; ++i) {
        if (u.hasOwnProperty(this[i])) {
            continue;
        }
        a.push(this[i]);
        u[this[i]] = 1;
    }
return a;
}

If you do have a mixed-type array, you can serialize the hash key:

Array.prototype.getUnique = function() {
    var hash = {}, result = [], key; 
    for ( var i = 0, l = this.length; i < l; ++i ) {
        key = JSON.stringify(this[i]);
        if ( !hash.hasOwnProperty(key) ) {
            hash[key] = true;
            result.push(this[i]);
        }
    }
    return result;
}
| improve this answer | |
5

If anyone using knockoutjs

ko.utils.arrayGetDistinctValues()

BTW have look at all ko.utils.array* utilities.

| improve this answer | |
4

To address the problem the other way around, it may be useful to have no duplicate while you load your array, the way Set object would do it but it's not available in all browsers yet. It saves memory and is more efficient if you need to look at its content many times.

Array.prototype.add = function (elem) {
   if (this.indexOf(elem) == -1) {
      this.push(elem);
   }
}

Sample:

set = [];
[1,3,4,1,2,1,3,3,4,1].forEach(function(x) { set.add(x); });

Gives you set = [1,3,4,2]

| improve this answer | |
4

For an object-based array with some unique id's, I have a simple solution through which you can sort in linear complexity

function getUniqueArr(arr){
    const mapObj = {};
    arr.forEach(a => { 
       mapObj[a.id] = a
    })
    return Object.values(mapObj);
}
| improve this answer | |
3

You can also use jQuery

var a = [1,5,1,6,4,5,2,5,4,3,1,2,6,6,3,3,2,4];

// note: jQuery's filter params are opposite of javascript's native implementation :(
var unique = $.makeArray($(a).filter(function(i,itm){ 
    // note: 'index', not 'indexOf'
    return i == $(a).index(itm);
}));

// unique: [1, 5, 6, 4, 2, 3]

Originally answered at: jQuery function to get all unique elements from an array?

| improve this answer | |
  • 7
    This one seems only to work for arrays of integers. When I include some strings they all get stripped out of the result. – hippietrail Sep 10 '12 at 7:30
3

This will work.

function getUnique(a) {
  var b = [a[0]], i, j, tmp;
  for (i = 1; i < a.length; i++) {
    tmp = 1;
    for (j = 0; j < b.length; j++) {
      if (a[i] == b[j]) {
        tmp = 0;
        break;
      }
    }
    if (tmp) {
      b.push(a[i]);
    }
  }
  return b;
}
| improve this answer | |
3

Using object keys to make unique array, I have tried following

function uniqueArray( ar ) {
  var j = {};

  ar.forEach( function(v) {
    j[v+ '::' + typeof v] = v;
  });


  return Object.keys(j).map(function(v){
    return j[v];
  });
}   

uniqueArray(["1",1,2,3,4,1,"foo", false, false, null,1]);

Which returns ["1", 1, 2, 3, 4, "foo", false, null]

| improve this answer | |
  • I think, your answer is the fastest solution because it uses hash. – Max Makhrov Mar 27 '17 at 12:22
3

I think this this is most easiest way to get unique item from array.

var arr = [1,2,4,1,4];
arr = Array.from(new Set(arr))
console.log(arr)
| improve this answer | |
3

Reduce it!!!

This alternative instead of deduplicating explicitly it will take the array and reduce it so that each value of the array can be iterated and destructured in an accumulative behavior, ignoring the already included values by exploiting the persistence of the array because of the recursiveness.

['a', 1, 'a', 2, '1'].reduce((accumulator, currentValue) => accumulator.includes(currentValue) ? accumulator : [...accumulator, currentValue], [])

Test Example:

var array = ['a', 1, 'a', 2, '1'];
const reducer = (accumulator, currentValue) => accumulator.includes(currentValue) ? accumulator : [...accumulator, currentValue];

console.log(
  array.reduce(reducer, [])
);

Conclusion

By far more elegant and useful when boring for-each approach wants to be avoided (not that it is not useful).

No need for external libraries like Underscore.js, JQuery or Lo-Dash, nor the trouble to create any built-in function to achieve the desired deduplicated effect.

Oh, and HEY!, it can be done as a one-liner!!!


This answered was possible thanks to ES5 (ECMAScript 2015) include() and reduce().

| improve this answer | |
3

Found this sweet snippet from a post by Changhui Xu for those looking to get unique objects. I haven't measured its performance against the other alternatives though.

const array = [{
    name: 'Joe',
    age: 17
  },
  {
    name: 'Bob',
    age: 17
  },
  {
    name: 'Tom',
    age: 25
  },
  {
    name: 'John',
    age: 22
  },
  {
    name: 'Jane',
    age: 20
  },
];

const distinctAges = [...new Set(array.map(a => a.age))];

console.log(distinctAges)

| improve this answer | |
  • How can i do this while keeping the name and age index inside the array? – DutchPrime Dec 17 '19 at 19:19
  • 2
    @DutchPrime, that's the caveat. The resulting array is smaller than the original array so indexes would clearly be off. I feel this can be a great question in itself, how about throwing it to the community as I also do more research on it. – Dev Yego Dec 19 '19 at 7:13
3

How about using set?

   let productPrice = [230,560,125,230,678,45,230,125,127];

   let tempData = new Set(productPrice);
   let uniqeProductPrice = [...tempData];

   uniqeProductPrice.forEach((item)=>{
      console.log(item)
    });
| improve this answer | |
  • how about using just simple Set instead of casting it into an array? new Set(arr).forEach – Endless Aug 7 at 1:06
3

The task is to get a unique array from an array consisted of arbitrary types (primitive and non primitive).

The approach based on using new Map(...) is not new. Here it is leveraged by JSON.stringify(...), JSON.parse(...) and [].map method. The advantages are universality (applicability for an array of any types), short ES6 notation and probably performance for this case:

const dedupExample = [
    { a: 1 },
    { a: 1 },
    [ 1, 2 ],
    [ 1, 2 ],
    1,
    1,
    '1',
    '1'
]

const getUniqArr = arr => {
    const arrStr = arr.map(item => JSON.stringify(item))
    return [...new Set(arrStr)]
        .map(item => JSON.parse(item))
}

console.info(getUniqArr(dedupExample))
   /* [ {a: 1}, [1, 2], 1, '1' ] */

| improve this answer | |
2

You can also use sugar.js:

[1,2,2,3,1].unique() // => [1,2,3]

[{id:5, name:"Jay"}, {id:6, name:"Jay"}, {id: 5, name:"Jay"}].unique('id') 
  // => [{id:5, name:"Jay"}, {id:6, name:"Jay"}]
| improve this answer | |
2

Building on other answers, here's another variant that takes an optional flag to choose a strategy (keep first occurrence or keep last):

Without extending Array.prototype

function unique(arr, keepLast) {
  return arr.filter(function (value, index, array) {
    return keepLast ? array.indexOf(value, index + 1) < 0 : array.indexOf(value) === index;
  });
};

// Usage
unique(['a', 1, 2, '1', 1, 3, 2, 6]); // -> ['a', 1, 2, '1', 3, 6]
unique(['a', 1, 2, '1', 1, 3, 2, 6], true); // -> ['a', '1', 1, 3, 2, 6]

Extending Array.prototype

Array.prototype.unique = function (keepLast) {
  return this.filter(function (value, index, array) {
    return keepLast ? array.indexOf(value, index + 1) < 0 : array.indexOf(value) === index;
  });
};

// Usage
['a', 1, 2, '1', 1, 3, 2, 6].unique(); // -> ['a', 1, 2, '1', 3, 6]
['a', 1, 2, '1', 1, 3, 2, 6].unique(true); // -> ['a', '1', 1, 3, 2, 6]
| improve this answer | |
2

Look at this. Jquery provides uniq method: https://api.jquery.com/jQuery.unique/

var ids_array = []

$.each($(my_elements), function(index, el) {
    var id = $(this).attr("id")
    ids_array.push(id)
});

var clean_ids_array = jQuery.unique(ids_array)

$.each(clean_ids_array, function(index, id) {
   elment = $("#" + id)   // my uniq element
   // TODO WITH MY ELEMENT
});
| improve this answer | |
  • If you read the description on the page you linked: Description: Sorts an array of DOM elements, in place, with the duplicates removed. Note that this only works on arrays of DOM elements, not strings or numbers. – Mottie Apr 22 '15 at 1:13
2

Do it with lodash and identity lambda function, just define it before use your object

const _ = require('lodash');
...    
_.uniqBy([{a:1,b:2},{a:1,b:2},{a:1,b:3}], v=>v.a.toString()+v.b.toString())
_.uniq([1,2,3,3,'a','a','x'])

and will have:

[{a:1,b:2},{a:1,b:3}]
[1,2,3,'a','x']

(this is the simplest way )

| improve this answer | |
2

Deduplication usually requires an equality operator for the given type. However, using an eq function stops us from utilizing a Set to determine duplicates in an efficient manner, because Set falls back to ===. As you know for sure, === doesn't work for reference types. So we're kind if stuck, right?

The way out is simply using a transformer function that allows us to transform a (reference) type into something we can actually lookup using a Set. We could use a hash function, for instance, or JSON.stringify the data structure, if it doesn't contain any functions.

Often we only need to access a property, which we can then compare instead of the Object's reference.

Here are two combinators that meet these requirements:

const dedupeOn = k => xs => {
  const s = new Set();

  return xs.filter(o =>
    s.has(o[k])
      ? null
      : (s.add(o[k]), o[k]));
};

const dedupeBy = f => xs => {
  const s = new Set();

  return xs.filter(x => {
    const r = f(x);
    
    return s.has(r)
      ? null
      : (s.add(r), x);
  });
};

const xs = [{foo: "a"}, {foo: "b"}, {foo: "A"}, {foo: "b"}, {foo: "c"}];

console.log(
  dedupeOn("foo") (xs)); // [{foo: "a"}, {foo: "b"}, {foo: "A"}, {foo: "c"}]

console.log(
  dedupeBy(o => o.foo.toLowerCase()) (xs)); // [{foo: "a"}, {foo: "b"}, {foo: "c"}]

With these combinators we're extremely flexible in handling all kinds of deduplication issues. It's not the fastes approach, but the most expressive and most generic one.

| improve this answer | |
2

pure js in one single line:

const uniqueArray = myArray.filter((elem, pos) => myArray.indexOf(elem) == pos); 
| improve this answer | |
  • This is O(n^2) performance, no? Other answers provide O(n), some also in one line and pure JS. – AMTerp Jan 4 at 4:25
2

The simplest method to find unique element using filter method:

var A1 = [2, 2, 4, 5, 5, 6, 8, 8, 9];

var uniqueA1 = A1.filter(function(element) {
  return A1.indexOf(element) == A1.lastIndexOf(element);
});

console.log(uniqueA1); // Output: [4,6,9]

Here the logic is that the first and the last occurrence of an element are the same then this element occurs only once, so the array elements which pass the callback condition are included in the new array and displayed.

| improve this answer | |
2

After looking into all the 90+ answers here, I saw there is room for one more:

Array.includes has a very handy second-parameter: "fromIndex", so by using it, every iteration of the filter callback method will search the array, starting from [current index] + 1 which guarantees not to include currently filtered item in the lookup and also saves time.

//                🚩              🚩 🚩
var list = [0,1,2,2,3,'a','b',4,5,2,'a']

console.log( 
  list.filter((v,i) => !list.includes(v,i+1))
)

// [0,1,3,"b",4,5,2,"a"]

Explenation:

For example, there's 2 at index 2 and the section of the array that gets scanned for duplicates is everything after index 2:

[0, 1, 2, 2 ,3 ,'a', 'b', 4, 5, 2, 'a']
       ⬆|----------------------------|

And since the currently filtered item's value 2 is included in the rest of the array, it will be filtered out, because of the leading exclamation mark which negates the filter rule.

| improve this answer | |
1

Similar to @sergeyz solution, but more compact by using more shorthand formats such as arrow functions and array.includes. Warning: JSlint will complain due to the use of the logical or and comma. (still perfectly valid javascript though)

my_array.reduce((a,k)=>(a.includes(k)||a.push(k),a),[])
| improve this answer | |
1

Multiple way to remove duplicate elements from an Array using

  • set
  • filter
  • forEach
  • lodash(third party library)
  • for loop

const names = ['XYZ', 'ABC', '123', 'ABC', 'ACE', 'ABC', '123'];

// set
let unique = [...new Set(names)];
console.log(unique);

// filter
let x = (names) => names.filter((val,i) => names.indexOf(val) === i)
console.log(x(names));


// forEach
function removeDuplicates(names) {
  let unique = {};
  names.forEach(function(i) {
    if(!unique[i]) {
      unique[i] = true;
    }
  });
  return Object.keys(unique);
}

console.log(removeDuplicates(names));

Using lodash

npm i lodash

code

import _ from 'lodash';

let uniqueVal = _.uniq (names);
console.dir(uniqueVal);

Using simple for loop

const names = ['XYZ', 'ABC', '123', 'ABC', 'ACE', 'ABC', '123'];
let unique=[];
names.sort();
let len = names.length;
for(let i=0;i<len;i++){
    if(names[i]!==names[i+1])
    unique.push(names[i])
}
console.log(unique)

| improve this answer | |
1

This should have better performance than the variant with list.indexOf

function uniq(list) { return [...new Set(list)] }
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    what about: const uniqueItems = [...new Set(list)] – Yair Nevet Apr 28 at 3:53
  • @YairNevet do you know if it's stable - i.e. does not reorder original list? – Alex Craft Apr 28 at 21:02
0

If order is not important then we can make an hash and get the keys to make unique array.

var ar = [1,3,4,5,5,6,5,6,2,1];
var uarEle = {};
links.forEach(function(a){ uarEle[a] = 1; });
var uar = keys(uarEle)

uar will be having the unique array elements.

| improve this answer | |
0
Array.prototype.unique = function() {
    var a = [],k = 0,e;
    for(k=0;e=this[k];k++)
      if(a.indexOf(e)==-1)
           a.push(e);
    return a;
}
[1,2,3,4,33,23,2,3,22,1].unique(); // return [1,2,3,4,33,23,22]
| improve this answer | |
0

Yet another solution for the pile.

I recently needed to make a sorted list unique and I did it using filter that keeps track of the previous item in an object like this:

uniqueArray = sortedArray.filter(function(e) { 
    if(e==this.last) 
      return false; 
    this.last=e; return true;  
  },{last:null});
| improve this answer | |
0

The version that accepts selector, should be pretty fast and concise:

function unique(xs, f) {
  var seen = {};
  return xs.filter(function(x) {
    var fx = (f && f(x)) || x;
    return !seen[fx] && (seen[fx] = 1);
  });
}
| improve this answer | |
0

If you have the mighty reduce method available (≥ 5.1), you can try something like this:

Array.prototype.uniq = function() {
  return this.reduce(function(sofar, cur) {
    return sofar.indexOf(cur) < 0 ? sofar.concat([cur]) : sofar;
  }, []);
};

It's not the most efficient implementation (because of the indexOf check, which may in the worst case go through the entire list). If efficiency matters, you can keep the "history" of occurrences in some random-access structure (say, {}) and key those instead. That's basically what the most voted answer does, so check that out for an example.

| improve this answer | |
  • Array.prototype.removeDuplicates = function() { var old_list = this; var new_list = []; old_list.forEach(function(value) { if(new_list.indexOf(value) === -1) { new_list.push(value); } }); return new_list; } – ryanwaite28 Mar 8 '18 at 22:11
0
var a = [1,4,2,7,1,5,9,2,4,7,2]
var b = {}, c = {};
var len = a.length;
for(var i=0;i<len;i++){
  a[i] in c ? delete b[a[i]] : b[a[i]] = true;
  c[a[i]] = true;
} 

// b contains all unique elements
| improve this answer | |
  • b returns {5: true, 9: true} in the example above (demo). – Mottie Nov 20 '15 at 15:40
0

This one is not pure, it will modify the array, but this is the fastest one. If yours is faster, then please write in the comments ;)

http://jsperf.com/unique-array-webdeb

Array.prototype.uniq = function(){
    for(var i = 0, l = this.length; i < l; ++i){
        var item = this[i];
        var duplicateIdx = this.indexOf(item, i + 1);
        while(duplicateIdx != -1) {
            this.splice(duplicateIdx, 1);
            duplicateIdx = this.indexOf(item, duplicateIdx);
            l--;
        }
    }

    return this;
}

[
 "",2,4,"A","abc",
 "",2,4,"A","abc",
 "",2,4,"A","abc",
 "",2,4,"A","abc",
 "",2,4,"A","abc",
 "",2,4,"A","abc",
 "",2,4,"A","abc",
 "",2,4,"A","abc"
].uniq() //  ["",2,4,"A","abc"]
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    but you might want to name your variable 'duplicate' not 'dublicate', unless you live in Dublin perhaps. – Michiel van der Blonk Aug 6 '16 at 16:47
  • 1
    @MichielvanderBlonk sry for my b4d english / dublish :) – webdeb Aug 7 '16 at 12:08

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