4

I'm working in Unity3D and C# to create a pseudo in-game Operating system (kinda ambitious)

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Please note that this is a pure design question, you could answer without knowing anything about Unity.

Here is what I have:

An abstract FILE, with children:

  1. TextFile
  2. MediaFile
  3. ImageFile

Also, an abstract Application, with children:

  1. TextViewer
  2. MediaPlayer
  3. ImageViewer

Obviously, TextViewer should open TextFiles, MediaPlayer should open MediaFiles and ImageViewer should open ImageFiles.

Now, I thought about it for a while, where should I put the who-opens-whom information? Should I let each file open itself? by creating an abstract Open in FILE, and overriding that in the children files? - I think that doesn't make sense, because a file, doesn't really know how to open itself, it's the application that knows how to open a file. For example, a pdf file, if you don't have a pdf reader (Adobe or something), you can't open a pdf.

This means that TextViewer should have a Open(TextFile text) method, MediaPlayer should have a Open(MediaFile media) and ImageViewer should have a Open(ImageFile image) method.

This could be achieved by using generics, in the declaration of Application, like:

public abstract class Application<T> where T : FILE
{
  public abstract void Open(T file);
}

Then:

public class TextViewer : Application<TextFile>
{
    public override void Open(TextFile file)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("TextViewer opening text file...");
    }
}

public class MediaPlayer : Application<MediaFile>
{
    public override void Open(MediaFile file)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("MediaPlayer opening media file...");
    }
}

public class ImageViewer : Application<ImageFile>
{
    public override void Open(ImageFile file)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ImageViewer opening image file...");
    }
}

Here's how the UML diagram looks like:

enter image description here

Looking good... Now the interesting part, how to bind/associate, each file type, with the right application the should open it? i.e. Right click a text file | get a list of options: "Open", "Rename", "Delete", etc | Choose "Open" - what happens next?

I came up with the idea, of a mediator between the FILE, and the Application - If we think about it for a second, how does a real OS, like Windows do it? - well if you go Start | Default Programs | Associate a file type or protocol with a program. - You will see a dictionary-type list, of keys (file types) and values (associated programs) - So I thought of doing just that, creating a dictionary that with it I register, a file type with an application. And here's where I'm stuck in...

First thing, what's the type of key and value should I go for in my dictionary? - I thought for a while, and came to the conclusion that it should be something like <Type, Application> - But the problem is, I can't just write Application on its own, I have to specify the generic T parameter :(

I hacked that, by creating an inbetweener class App which I then let my Application<T> inherit from:

public abstract class App { }

public abstract class Application <T> : App where T : FILE { /* stuff... */ }

OK, now I can let my dictionary be of <Type, App>

public static class Mediator
{
    static private TextViewer tv;
    static private MediaPlayer mp;
    static private ImageViewer iv;
    static private Dictionary<Type, App> dic = new Dictionary<Type, App>();

    static Mediator()
    {
        tv = new TextViewer();
        iv = new ImageViewer();
        mp = new MediaPlayer();

        // register what we have
        dic.Add(typeof(TextFile), tv);
        dic.Add(typeof(MediaFile), mp);
        dic.Add(typeof(ImageFile), iv);
    }

    static public void Open(FILE file)
    {
        App app = dic[file.GetType()];
        if (app == null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("No application was assigned to open up " + file);
            return;
        }

        app. // here is where my hack falls short, no Open method inside App :(
    }
}

Oops, that totally didn't work! - As you can see, I was trying my best to avoid things like:

if (file is TextFile)
  // open with text viewer
else if (file is MediaFile)
  // open with media player
else if (file is ImageFile)
  // open with image viewer
else if etc

This is like a nightmare to me!

I could avoid all the trouble, by making my applications singletons, so now in each file:

public class TextFile : FILE
{
   public override void Open()
   {
      TextViewer.Instance.Open(this);
   }
}

And so on for the rest of the files. But I don't wanna do that, I don't wanna give up to using singletons! What if I wanted my MediaPlayer or TextViewer, to have more than one instance and not just one?

I've been struggling at this for a long time now, I hope I made my problem clear. I just want to know, how does associating file types with the right application works the right way (like in Windows for example) - How can I achieve what I'm after, in an elegant, robust way? - Is there a design pattern I could use for this? - All my attempts above, was I thinking right? am I close to the solution?

Thanks a lot for any help in advance.

1

Without putting a tremendous amount of thought into the design and not knowing unity, or how your files are really represented, the approach I would take is an Interface-based one, not a generic-based.

First, I would define an interface that defines my file class, i.e. IFile, and implement this in each of my files.

public interface IFile
{

}

public class MediaFile : IFile
{
    ...
}

Next, I would define an interface that defines my application class, i.e. IApplication, and implement this in each of my applications.

public interface IApplication
{
    Type GetSupportedApplicationType();
    void OpenFile(IFile oFile);
}


public class MediaApplication : IApplication
{

    #region IApplication Members

    public Type GetSupportedApplicationType()
    {
        return typeof(MediaFile);
    }

    public void OpenFile(IFile oFile)
    {
        // do the work
    }

    #endregion
}

The links between the files and applications, then, would be a dictionary that contains the class type for the file as the key and the class type for the application as the value:

<GetType(MediaFile), GetType(MediaPlayer)>

When the mediator is passed the file to execute, it can find the appropriate application by using the type of the file to search the dictionary for the appropriate application type.

Once you find the appropriate application type, you can create an instance of it using System.GetActivator. Then, since you know it implements IApplication, you can execute a method such as OpenFile(IFile) on the application.

The only trick is creating the initial dictionary entries. To do this, I would actually use reflection to gather the list of classes that implement IApplication.

Once you do this, you can create an instance of each of the classes using System.GetActivator, then execute a known method, such as GetSupportedFileType that returns the full type of the IFile implementation that the IApplication supports.

(The code below takes a shortcut to registering apps, which is easier than implementing the reflection approach)

public static class Mediator
{
    static private Dictionary<Type, Type> dic = new Dictionary<Type, Type>();

    static Mediator()
    {
        RegisterApp(new MediaApplication());
    }

    static void RegisterApp(IApplication oApp)
    {
        dic.Add(oApp.GetSupportedApplicationType(), oApp.GetType());
    }

    static public void Open(IFile file)
    {
        Type appType = dic[file.GetType()];
        if (appType == null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("No application was assigned to open up " + file);
            return;
        }

        IApplication app = (IApplication)System.Activator.CreateInstance(appType);
        app.OpenFile(file);
    }
}
  • Awesome! However, one question: in your MediaApplication you had Open take a IFile - This means that I'm gonna have to cast it to a MediaFile (knowing that it implements IFile), right? cause I need the MediaFile info... – vexe Oct 27 '13 at 0:06
  • Yes, each of the OpenFile implementations needs to cast to the appropriate type assuming that you actually need to know the type to perform operations. The best way to handle this, if you can, is to add as much to the IFile interface as possible. This approach also allows single applications to support multiple file types; OpenFile just needs to be modified to test the type of IFile and behave accordingly. – competent_tech Oct 27 '13 at 0:10
  • Well, I guess this will work, but let me try it :D - But don't you think it would be optimal if each application took the right type of file, in their Open method? - I mean, if someone were to come in and go mediaPlayer.Open( and sees an IFile as a parameter, this means that anything that implements IFile should fit in just fine... (and it's kinda true, I mean we'll be checking to make sure that we get the right file type, but still, ya know... I hope you're feeling me) - Maybe there's a way around that? – vexe Oct 27 '13 at 0:14
  • OK I guess that's not a big concern. I guess I'll roll with your solution and see what sums up. I might get back to you later if you don't mind. One thing though, why did you use interfaces for the file and application? why not abstract classes? I'm trying to wrap my head around when to use when, they say, you use a class when you have a logic, and interface when you have a behavior! The reason I chose an abstract class for application, is that I thought that it's 'something', it's an object, it's a living thing, not a behavior... Could you put some light on that? Thanks a lot. – vexe Oct 27 '13 at 0:56
  • 1
    The primary reason for choosing Interface over abstract class as the controlling element is ease of maintenance, implementation, and unit testing. When you implement abstract classes, your implementation is more rigid and thus more fragile as you add features and functions over time. However, Interfaces and abstract classes are NOT mutually exclusive. There is no reason you can't implement a base abstract class that all files inherit from and that class is the one that implements IFile. Using interfaces, however, allows you to introduce a second base class for different types of data (ie URLs) – competent_tech Oct 27 '13 at 1:09
1

Maybe this would work out for you,instead of declaring an abstract method in application class and creating the generics you could make an interface and implement its open method like so:

    public interface IFile<T>
    {
        void Open(T path);
    }

    public abstract class Application
    {
        //public abstract void Open();
    }


    public class TextViewer : Application, IFile<TextFile>
    {
        public void Open(TextFile path)
        {
            //open textfile....
        }
    }

    public class MediaPlayer : Application, IFile<MediaFile>
    {     
        public void Open(MediaFile path)
        {
            //open media file...
        }
    }

    public class ImageViewer : Application, IFile<ImageFile>
    {
        public void Open(ImageFile path)
        {
            //open imagefile....
        }
    }
  • Thanks for your reply, this is definitely interesting! - But this is half the solution, how would you then go about solving the association/bonding problem? – vexe Oct 27 '13 at 0:17
  • you mean like the example you said in your question?right-click a text file and those options you asked?....i really dont know the design but roughly,if you have a context menu(for example) with the open() command and if the user clicks the open menu item,in the handler you first check the file extension(this is a quick way of a check),if its .txt then TextViewer.Open(TextFile path) where the path TextFile variable is created based on that file selected and passed to the open method – terrybozzio Oct 27 '13 at 0:42

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