0

I faced with problem. Code:

// withdraw method
 public void withdraw(long n)
{
    this.n = n;
    Action a = new WithDraw();
    a.doAction(n);
    **if(actionsList.size() > 10)**
    {
        actionsList.poll();
        actionsList.offer(a);

    } else
    {
        actionsList.offer(a);
    }

}

// Deposit method goes here

    public void deposit(long n)
{
  this.n = n;
  Action a = new Deposit();
  a.doAction(n);
  **if(actionsList.size()<10)**
  {

      actionsList.offer(a);
  } else 
  {
      actionsList.poll();
      actionsList.offer(a);
  }

}

The Main function looks like this:

    acc1.deposit(1);
    acc1.withdraw(2);
    acc1.deposit(3);
    acc1.withdraw(4);
    acc1.deposit(5);
    acc1.withdraw(6);
    acc1.deposit(7);
    acc1.withdraw(8);
    acc1.deposit(9);
    acc1.withdraw(10);
    acc1.deposit(11);
    acc1.withdraw(12);
    acc1.deposit(13);
    acc1.withdraw(14);
    acc1.deposit(15);
    acc1.displayActions();

I need 10 last added elements. After this I got printed 11 elements not 10. What's wrong with that? Maybe I do not understand Queue size() correctly?

ADDED print method:

public void displayActions()
    {
        for(Action s : actionsList)
        {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    }
3
  • Please post your displayActions method. Oct 27 '13 at 10:31
  • This is what I understand (is this correct?): You have two kinds of actions: Withdraw and deposit. The actions withdraw or deposit something somewhere like money to/from a bank account. All these actions come into a queue and only the last ten should stay in there - no matter if it is a withdraw or a deposit. What I first dont understand is the unsymmetric code. Queue-wise they do the same and should have the same code - or do I misunderstand that? Could you please explain?
    – jboi
    Oct 27 '13 at 10:50
  • Firstly, you understand it correctly. Secondly,It does not matter if this is symmetric or not, because I fixed it to make it symmetric but the result is the same.
    – Ernusc
    Oct 27 '13 at 11:35
2

When the size is equal to 10, you can still add another, so you get 11.

As others have mentioned the opposite of > is <= also >= is < and == is != In short you should try to keep your code as consistent as possible. If code is supposed to do the same thing, you should write it the same way, if not use a method to do them both.

public void withdraw(long n) {
    queueAction(new Withdrawal(n));
}

public void deposit(long n) {
    queueAction(new Deposit(n));
}

void queueAction(Action action) {
    action.doAction();
    if (actionsList.size() >= 10)
        actionsList.poll();
    actionsList.offer(aaction);
}

I have taken out this.n = n; as this doesn't appear to do anything and I don't see the point of performing an action before you queue it...

I am not sure why I would want to silently discard any deposits older than the last 10. I would like to be able to ignore some of my withdrawals though.

0
1

Is this just not a simple case of the .size() starting at 0?

IE, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 = 11

1
  • I dont think so, but I'm also not really sure, what exactly needs to be achieved. If you ask for size() < 10 the queue has up to 10 elements. The elements are just indexed 0-9, but I haven't seen code in there that asks for the index
    – jboi
    Oct 27 '13 at 10:54
0

for withdraw you test for size() > 10 and for deposit size()<10 - but the opposite of <10 is not >10 but >=10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.