5

I have just started to learn about threads and methodinvoking in c#, but I have come across a problem which I couldn't find the solution of.

I made a basic C# form program which keeps updating and displaying a number, by starting a thread and invoke delegate.

Starting new thread on Form1_load:

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
        t = new System.Threading.Thread(DoThisAllTheTime);
        t.Start();
  }

Public void DoThisAllTheTime (which keeps updating the number) :

public void DoThisAllTheTime()
  {
     while(true)
      {
        if (!this.IsDisposed)
         {
           number += 1;
           MethodInvoker yolo = delegate() { label1.Text = number.ToString(); };
           this.Invoke(yolo);
         }
      }
  }

Now when I click the X button of the form, I get the following exception:

'An unhandled exception of type 'System.ObjectDisposedException' occurred in System.Windows.Forms.dll

Can't update a deleted object'

While I actually did check if the form was disposed or not.

EDIT: I added catch (ObjectDisposedException ex) to the code which fixed the problem. Working code:

  public void DoThisAllTheTime()
  {
     while(true)
      {
         number += 1;

         try {  
              MethodInvoker yolo = delegate() { label1.Text = number.ToString(); };
              this.Invoke(yolo);
             }
         catch (ObjectDisposedException ex)
             {
              t.Abort();
             }
      }
 }
3

Your call to this.IsDisposed is always out of date. You need to intercept your form closing event and stop the thread explicitly. Then you won't have to do that IsDisposed test at all.

There are many ways you can do this. Personally, I would use the System.Threading.Tasks namespace, but if you want to keep your use of System.Threading, you should define a member variable _updateThread, and launch it in your load event:

_updateThread = new System.Threading.Thread(DoThisAllTheTime);
_updateThread.Start();

Then in your closing event:

private void Form1_Closing(object sender, CancelEventArgs e)
{
    _stopCounting = true;
    _updateThread.Join();
}

Finally, replace the IsDisposed test with a check on the value of your new _stopCounting member variable:

public void DoThisAllTheTime()
{
    MethodInvoker yolo = delegate() { label1.Text = number.ToString(); };
    while(!_stopCounting)
    {
        number += 1;
        this.Invoke(yolo);
    }
}
  • I tried adding 't.abort();' to Form1_closing, but that didn't help either. – John Oct 27 '13 at 15:54
  • @Bart: Try setting a flag and then calling t.Join(); to wait until the thread has recognized it. – Ry- Oct 27 '13 at 15:55
  • I added catch (ObjectDisposedException ex) to it. This fixed the problem. I will update my question. – John Oct 27 '13 at 16:01
  • @Bart: As oefe said, that’s heinous! :D – Ry- Oct 27 '13 at 16:02
  • 1
    Since Invoke is blocking waiting for the main thread, there is a possibility for deadlock here if the Form1_Closing method is executed on the line number += 1;. The chance of deadlock goes up as more and more work is done in place of that line. I fixed this in my app by using BeginInvoke instead of Invoke since BeginInvoke will not block the thread from exiting and hence the Join will not block forever. – Wayne Uroda Jul 29 '16 at 1:03
2

Just put this override in your form class:

protected override void OnClosing(CancelEventArgs e) {
    t.Abort();
    base.OnClosing(e);
}
  • +1 For a nice solution. To get more info: see stackoverflow.com/questions/1874728/… – Alireza Oct 27 '13 at 16:04
  • I tried this: It works too. Thank you. – John Oct 27 '13 at 16:06
  • @Alireza Thanks buddy. The answer is compatible with starter's skills that I got -and thought- from the question. But thanks really. Cheers – javad amiry Oct 27 '13 at 16:13
  • 2
    Normal scenario shutdown MUST NOT include calls to Thread.Abort(), Application.Exit(), etc. I've seen a bug caused by this -- transactions weren't rolled back because of a spurios Environment.Exit() inside of an OnClose() event handler. – Joker_vD Oct 27 '13 at 20:19
-3
private void Form1_FormClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e)
{
Thread.CurrentThread.Abort();
}

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