This is the minimal code to reproduce the problem. The only external prerequisite is the pugixml.hpp file.

The context is a class to resolve id references in an XML file (i.e. given a string value, find the node which has its id attribute set to that value). I have some helper classes wrapping the pugixml API, of which the relevant portion is this:

Agent.h

#include "pugixml.hpp"
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

    /**
     * Adapter to strip away the xpath layer around a xml_node.
     */
    template <typename Functor>
    struct Shim
    {
        Functor&    functor_;

        Shim( Functor&  functor ) 
        : functor_(functor) 
        {}

        void operator() ( pugi::xpath_node const& xpnode ) 
        {
            functor_( xpnode.node() );
        }
    };

    class Agent
    {
    public:
        explicit
        Agent( std::string const& xpath )
        : xpath_(xpath)
        {}

        // generic traverse over an xpath node_set
        template <typename Handler >
        size_t map( pugi::xml_node const& root, Handler& handler ) const
        {
            pugi::xpath_node_set    _xpset(root.select_nodes( xpath_.c_str() ));
            if ( _xpset.size() > 0 )
            {
                std::for_each( _xpset.begin(), _xpset.end(), Shim<Handler>(handler) );
            }
            return _xpset.size();
        }

    private:
        std::string     xpath_; // TODO: compile this into xpath_query?
    };

#define XML_Node    pugi::xml_node

My first implementation of the id resolver class was this

IdNodeSet-A.h

#include "Agent.h"
#include <map>

    class IdNodeSet
    {
        typedef std::map<char const*, XML_Node> NodeMap;
    public: 
        IdNodeSet( XML_Node const& docRoot, XML_Node& defaultNode = XML_Node() )
        : map_()
        , default_(defaultNode)
        {
            Agent("//*[@id]").map( docRoot, *this );
        }

        void operator() ( XML_Node const& node )
        {
            map_[node.attribute("id").as_string()] = node;
        }

        XML_Node operator [] ( const char* id ) const
        {
            NodeMap::const_iterator _cit(map_.find( id ));
            return _cit != map_.end() ? _cit->second : default_;    
        }

    private:            
        NodeMap     map_;
        XML_Node    default_;
    };

This produced the following error in Cygwin g++ 3.4.4 (cygming special, gdc 0.12, using dmd 0.125):

IdNodeSet-A.h:29: internal compiler error: Segmentation fault
Please submit a full bug report,
with preprocessed source if appropriate.
See <URL:http://cygwin.com/problems.html> for instructions.

Which is completely mystifying.

The only thing that occurs to me is using '*this' in the constructor. But a modification using a helper member class instead:

IDNodeSet-B.h

#include "Agent.h"
#include <map>

    class IdNodeSet
    {
        typedef std::map<char const*, XML_Node> NodeMap;
    public: 
        IdNodeSet( XML_Node const& docRoot, XML_Node& defaultNode = XML_Node() )
        : map_()
        , helper_(map_)
        , default_(defaultNode)
        {
            Agent("//*[@id]").map( docRoot, helper_ );
        }

        XML_Node operator [] ( const char* id ) const
        {
            NodeMap::const_iterator _cit(map_.find( id ));
            return _cit != map_.end() ? _cit->second : default_;    
        }

    private:            
        NodeMap     map_;
        struct Helper
        {
            Helper(NodeMap& map)
            : map_(map)
            {}

            void operator() ( XML_Node const& node )
            {
                map_[node.attribute("id").as_string()] = node;
            }

            NodeMap&    map_;
        }           helper_;
        XML_Node    default_;
    };

produces the same error:

IdNodeSet-B.h:38: internal compiler error: Segmentation fault
Please submit a full bug report,
with preprocessed source if appropriate.
See <URL:http://cygwin.com/problems.html> for instructions.

This is not rocket science code, so what could be causing the compiler to core dump?

UPDATE: The preprocessor output (i.e. from g++ -E) compiles with no problem in both cases. So this qualifies as a possible workaround, but the question remains: what kind of code should be avoided in situations where the workaround is not feasible?

  • To be fair, the compiler is also a bit on the older side. It was released May, 2005. – Dave S Oct 28 '13 at 1:41
  • Sure, but it seems to be compiling much more hairy stuff elsewhere with aplomb. I'm constrained here by the usual corporate policy mandated out-of-datedness, so upgrading is not an option. So I'd really like to know what to avoid. – arayq2 Oct 28 '13 at 2:07
  • Have you submitted a bug report? – Keith Thompson Oct 28 '13 at 2:31
  • For an out of date version? I couldn't see the utility of that. – arayq2 Oct 28 '13 at 2:33
  • stop using needless #defines when typedef would do. Include header guards. Always have a blank line at the end of every source file (no comments). Check for non printing characters. Ask compiler to dump preprocessor output, compile that, and delete from that until you have sscce.org – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Oct 28 '13 at 3:32

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.