1

I want to create a grammar and lexer to parse the below string:

100 reason phrase

regular expression will be: "\d{3} [^\r\n]*"

token definition:

template <typename Lexer>
struct custom_tokens : lex::lexer<Lexer>
{
    custom_tokens()
    {
        this->self.add_pattern
            ("STATUSCODE", "\\d{3}")                
            ("SP", " ")
            ("REASONPHRASE", "[^\r\n]*")
            ;                

        this->self.add                          
            ("{STATUSCODE}", T_STATUSCODE)
            ("{SP}", T_SP)
            ("{REASONPHRASE}", T_REASONPHRASE)
            ;
    }   
};

grammar:

template <typename Iterator>
struct custom_grammar : qi::grammar<Iterator >
{
    template <typename TokenDef>
    custom_grammar(TokenDef const& tok)
        : custom_grammar::base_type(start)            
    {            
        start = (qi::token(T_STATUSCODE) >> qi::token(T_SP) >> qi::token(T_REASONPHRASE));
    }

    qi::rule<Iterator> start;
};

however, I realized that I couldn't define token "T_REASONPHRASE" because it will match everything including "T_STATUSCODE". what I can do is

  1. undefine T_REASONPHRASE and use qi::lexeme to write a rule inside custom_grammar?

  2. can I use lex state to do that? e.g. define "T_REASONPHRASE" in second state, if it sees T_STATUSCODE in first state then parse the rest to second state? please give an example?

  • @sehe, think the above example isn't good.if I want to match string BYE REASON PHRASE, regular expression is BYE [^\r\n]*, T_STATUSCODE="BYE", T_REASONPHRASE="[^\r\n]*", then T_REASONPHRASE will be definitely matched always. – Rui Zhou Oct 28 '13 at 16:03
  • I'm not sure but I think that sehe won't be notified of that message. If you want him to be notified you should put that as a comment in his answer. I have very little experience with lex but I think your new example does not change anything. It should work if you add status_code before reason_phrase as sehe claims in his answer. – llonesmiz Oct 28 '13 at 16:10
2

I don't think there really is a problem, because tokens are 'greedily' matched in the order they've been added to the token definitions (for a specific lexer state).

So, given

    this->self.add                          
        ("{STATUSCODE}", T_STATUSCODE)
        ("{SP}", T_SP)
        ("{REASONPHRASE}", T_REASONPHRASE)
        ;

T_STATUSCODE will always match before T_REASONPHRASE (if there is an ambiguity at all).


About using separate Lexer states, here's an excerpt of a tokenizer I once had in a toy project:

this->self = fileheader     [ lex::_state = "GT" ];

this->self("GT") =
    gametype_label |
    gametype_63000 | gametype_63001 | gametype_63002 |
    gametype_63003 | gametype_63004 | gametype_63005 |
    gametype_63006 |
    gametype_eol            [ lex::_state = "ML" ];

this->self("ML") = mvnumber [ lex::_state = "MV" ];

this->self("MV") = piece | field | op | check | CASTLEK | CASTLEQ 
         | promotion
         | Checkmate | Stalemate | EnPassant
         | eol              [ lex::_state = "ML" ]
         | space            [ lex::_pass = lex::pass_flags::pass_ignore ];

(The purpose would be relatively clear if you read GT as gametype, ML: move line and MV: move; Note the presence of eol and gametype_eol here: Lex disallows adding the same token to different states)

  • Added a snippet on using separate lexer states – sehe Oct 28 '13 at 10:40
  • think the above example isn't good.if I want to match string BYE REASON PHRASE, regular expression is BYE [^\r\n]*, T_STATUSCODE="BYE", T_REASONPHRASE="[^\r\n]*", then T_REASONPHRASE will be definitely matched always. – Rui Zhou Oct 28 '13 at 16:24
  • however, the lexer::state works, thanks – Rui Zhou Oct 28 '13 at 16:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.