26

After upgrading to Mac OS X 10.9 / Xcode 5.0.1, command lines to create a shared library (.dylib) failed with several undefined symbols.

clang++ -dynamiclib -install_name test.dylib *.o -o test.dylib
Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64:
  "std::allocator<char>::allocator()", referenced from:
      _main in test.o
  "std::allocator<char>::~allocator()", referenced from:
      _main in test.o
  "std::ostream::operator<<(std::ostream& (*)(std::ostream&))", referenced from:
      _main in test.o
  "std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_string(char const*, std::allocator<char> const&)", referenced from:
      _main in test.o
  "std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::~basic_string()", referenced from:
      _main in test.o
  "std::ios_base::Init::Init()", referenced from:
      ___cxx_global_var_init in test.o
  "std::ios_base::Init::~Init()", referenced from:
      ___cxx_global_var_init in test.o
  "std::cout", referenced from:
      _main in test.o
  "std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::endl<char, std::char_traits<char> >(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&)", referenced from:
      _main in test.o
  "std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >& std::operator<<<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >(std::basic_ostream<char, std::char_traits<char> >&, std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > const&)", referenced from:
      _main in test.o
ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64

2 Answers 2

36

The answer is there: https://mathematica.stackexchange.com/questions/34692/mathlink-linking-error-after-os-x-10-9-mavericks-upgrade

There are two implementations of the standard C++ library available on OS X: libstdc++ and libc++. They are not binary compatible and libMLi3 requires libstdc++.

On 10.8 and earlier libstdc++ is chosen by default, on 10.9 libc++ is chosen by default. To ensure compatibility with libMLi3, we need to choose libstdc++ manually.

To do this, add -stdlib=libstdc++ to the linking command.

Related post: Compiling with Clang using Libc++ undefined references


Edit: After some investigations it seems there is a link between the -mmacosx-version-min and the choice of the default libstd. If min version < 10.9, then the default libstd is equal to libstdc++, else to libc++. The long term solution is clearly to use -stdlib=libc++

6
  • 1
    do you know how to make "-stdlib=libc++" the default permanently?
    – Ajay
    Commented Aug 11, 2014 at 17:44
  • 1
    excuse me, but have you got the answer of how to "add -stdlib=libstdc++ to the linking command" ? @Ajay
    – Calios
    Commented Aug 12, 2014 at 10:42
  • It's a setup of your building tool. Commented Aug 13, 2014 at 11:29
  • 1
    What is a linking command? I've got a makefile and have this problem, but don't know where to put -stdlib=libstdc++
    – rjurney
    Commented Jul 15, 2015 at 20:23
  • 1
    In your Makefile, there should be a "linker rule" to create the binary executable from the intermediate sources (*.o). If your Makefile is standard, then you should introduce this into the LDFLAGS variable. Commented Jul 16, 2015 at 7:49
0

Those suggestions did not work for me with Mac El capitan. If you have similar issues after upgrading to El Capitan, just run

xcode-select --install

before trying to compile

1
  • 2
    This did not work for me. Can you help me understand what the purpose of this is? Maybe I can find out why it doesn't work for me if I know what this is supposed to change/solve. Commented Sep 26, 2016 at 22:18

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