I try to implement a reader monad for the first time.

I want to use monadic style to query the database.

use case 1 : a user has a one-to-one relation with a colleague. Pseudo code is getUserById(getUserById(id).getColleague())

use case 2 : retrieve a list of users by id. Pseudo code is List(getUserById(id1), getUserById(id2))

It seems that this is good use cases for monads. My goal is to see if I can take advantage of monads to improve my code

PS : Please provide at least one answer without scalaz.

Here is the code :

package monad
import com.mongodb.casbah.Imports._

object Monad {
  type UserId = Int
  case class User(id: UserId, name: String, colleagueId: UserId)

  trait Reader[I, A] { self =>
    def run(id: I) : A
    def map[B](f: A => B) : Reader[I, B] = 
      new Reader[I, B] { def run(id: I) = f(self.run(id)) }
    def flatMap[B](f: A => Reader[I, B]) : Reader[I, B] =
      new Reader[I, B] { def run(id: I) = f(self.run(id)).run(id) }
  }

  def coll = MongoClient()("test")("user")

  def DBObject2User(o: DBObject) : User = User(o.as[Double]("id").toInt, o.as[String]("name"), o.as[Double]("colleague").toInt)

  // Strange design, id is not used…
  def User2Colleague(u: User) : Reader[UserId, DBObject] = 
    unit(coll.findOne(MongoDBObject("id" -> u.colleagueId)).get)

  def GetUserById : Reader[UserId, DBObject] = 
    Reader { id: UserId => coll.findOne(MongoDBObject("id" -> id)).get }

  def GetUserById2 : Reader[UserId, User] = GetUserById.map(DBObject2User)

  def unit[A](a: => A) = Reader { id: UserId => a }

  object Reader {
    def apply[I, A](f: I => A) = new Reader[I, A] { def run(i: I) = f(i) }
  }

  def main(args: Array[String]) {
    // I can do
    println(GetUserById2.run(1))

    // Same with for comprehension
    val userReader = for (io <- GetUserById2) yield io
    println(userReader.run(1))

    //Combination to explore one-to-one relation
    val user = GetUserById2.run(1)
    val colleague = GetUserById2.run(user.colleagueId)

    // Same with flatMap
    println(GetUserById2.flatMap(User2Colleague).run(1))

    // Same with for-comprehension but doesn't work
    val io = for {io  <- GetUserById2
                  io2 <- User2Colleague(io).map(DBObject2User)} yield io2
    println(io.run(1))

    //TODO: List[Reader] to Reader[List]
  }
}

Is it the good way ? I have some doubt, cf my comment Strange design

How could I improve my code ?

  • 1
    Are you doing it to practice or for production code? You might want to look at Rogue and/or Lift MongoRecord for ready made solution. Basically they return Box for findOne with subtypes: Full[MyDbObject], Empty, Failure(...), and a List[MyDbObject] for fetch or fetchAll. I didn't look at your code yet, but it will be interesting to see. I'll write more comments if I'll have them ;) – yǝsʞǝlA Oct 28 '13 at 15:52
  • Why not use a mapper like salat? You could reduce your client code using that – Stefan Kunze Oct 28 '13 at 18:41
  • @AIfgfgf it's for production, i use Play and not Lift – Yann Moisan Oct 28 '13 at 18:49
  • 1
    First I need to point out that the ´UserId´ type parameter in ´trait IO[UserId, A]´ is not the type alias for ´Int´. It would be the same if you wrote ´trait IO[T, A]´. Then it would help if you add some comment to explain what you expect from the code. It looks like the Reader input you're using is this UserId instead of the mongo configuration. Could you give some more hint to what you'd like to achieve? Thanks – pagoda_5b Oct 28 '13 at 23:16
  • 1
    I suggest improving your names while you are changing stuff : what is mng ? Another thing if you are always going to map your values from the DBObject representation, do it in User2Colleague and mng and return a reader [UserID,User]. this will avoid a lot of repeated code in the client code – Jean Oct 29 '13 at 14:17
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have tried to rework your proposal making the collection the Input for the reader, reworking the naming a bit as I went.

package monad
package object reader{
  type UserId = Int
}
package reader {

case class User(id: UserId, name: String, colleagueId: UserId)

import com.mongodb.casbah.Imports._
import com.mongodb.casbah


trait Reader[I, A] {
  self =>
  val run = apply _

  def apply(id:I):A

  def map[B](f: A => B): Reader[I, B] =
    new Reader[I, B] {
      def apply(id: I) = f(self.run(id))
    }

  def flatMap[B](f: A => Reader[I, B]): Reader[I, B] =
    new Reader[I, B] {
      def apply(id: I) = f(self(id)).run(id)
    }
}

object Reader {
  def unit[A](a: => A) = apply {
    id: UserId => a
  }

  def apply[I, A](f: I => A) = new Reader[I, A] {
    def apply(i: I) = f(i)
  }
}

object Users {

  def asUser(o: DBObject): User = User(o.as[Double]("id").toInt, o.as[String]("name"), o.as[Double]("colleague").toInt)

  def colleague(u: User): Reader[MongoCollection, User] =
    Reader{ 
      coll => asUser(coll.findOne(MongoDBObject("id" -> u.colleagueId)).get)
    }

  def getUserById(id:UserId): Reader[MongoCollection, User] =
    Reader {
      coll => asUser(coll.findOne(MongoDBObject("id" -> id)).get)
    }
}

object Client extends App {

  import Users._
  def coll: casbah.MongoCollection = MongoClient()("test")("user")

  // I can do
  println(getUserById(1)(coll))

  // Same with for comprehension
  val userReader = for (user <- getUserById(1)) yield user
  println(userReader(coll))

  //Combination to explore one-to-one relation
  val user = getUserById(1)(coll)
  val otherUser = getUserById(user.colleagueId)(coll)

  // Same with flatMap
  println(getUserById(1).flatMap(colleague)(coll))

  // Same with for-comprehension but doesn't work
  val coworkerReader = for {user <- getUserById(1)
                            coworker <- colleague(user)} yield coworker
  println(coworkerReader(coll))         
}

}

Using this approach I think the code is easier to test as you can pass around the dependency(the MongoCollection) while manipulating only values and functions in your signatures. Read more at http://blog.originate.com/blog/2013/10/21/reader-monad-for-dependency-injection/ (I am not the author but it is a clear explanation)

  • getUserById works because closure capture the external context in Scala (will not works in Java 8 if id is not a final field). Confirmation ? – Yann Moisan Oct 31 '13 at 14:34
  • I have to modify apply method to make it compile : def apply(id: I) = run(id). Any explanation ? – Yann Moisan Oct 31 '13 at 14:55
  • you are right about getUserById but that's exactly the same as your User2Colleague which is a closure referencing the u argument. – Jean Oct 31 '13 at 20:22
  • sorry about the apply thing, it works the other way around (having run defined in terms of apply) and I blindly reversed it just before copy pasting to stackoverflow ... – Jean Oct 31 '13 at 20:51

Reader monad & monad transformers step-by-step + examples with mongoDB, good described here.

Your usage is not that bad, what I find confusing is the idea that what's usually considered the configuration input for a reader (like the db connection data) is in this case the id of the user under inspection.

First I'd change the IO[I,A] name to Reader[I,A] just for the sake of using a well known name for such operation[*]

As for the User2Colleague(u: User) : IO[UserId, DBObject] method, it's not that unusual to discard the reader input to provide a constant value wrapped in the monad: this is exactly what your unit method does!

In fact I'd change that to

def User2Colleague(u: User) : Reader[UserId, DBObject] = 
  unit(coll.findOne(MongoDBObject("id" -> u.colleagueId)).get)

or even more consistently with your client code usage

def User2Colleague(u: User): DBObject = coll.findOne(MongoDBObject("id" -> u.colleagueId)).get
...
def main(args: Array[String]) {
  val mng = new Mongo()

  val io = for {
    io <- mng
    io2 <- unit(DBObject2User(io))
    io3 <- unit(User2Colleague(io2))
  } yield (DBObject2User(io3))

  println(io.run(1))  

What I suggest is to write your code as pure as possible (i.e. with no monadic effect) unless required. This means doing your mappings in regular functions and then wrapping with unit only as needed (as to make composition typecheck within the for comprehension)

[*] The usual IO monad has no input type, it just has an output type, and is usually targeted to do user I/O (console, printing, emailing, sending rockets, etc), i.e. anything which has side effects external to the program itself.

  • I've just edit my code to add IO companion object to simplify the code. – Yann Moisan Oct 29 '13 at 14:08
  • 1
    But now you have 2 ways to put a value in the monad, and they're not deferring to each other, which means code duplication. I'd try to generalize unit[A] to unit[I,A] and make IO.apply call that, or the other way round. – pagoda_5b Oct 29 '13 at 14:15
  • 1
    I've edited to make unit call IO.apply to remove code duplication – Yann Moisan Oct 29 '13 at 15:04

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.