110

I need a queue with a fixed size. When I add an element and the queue is full, it should automatically remove the oldest element.

Is there an existing implementation for this in Java?

14 Answers 14

17

There is no existing implementation in the Java Language and Runtime. All Queues extend AbstractQueue, and its doc clearly states that adding an element to a full queue always ends with an exception. It would be best ( and quite simple ) to wrap a Queue into a class of your own for having the functionality you need.

Once again, because all queues are children of AbstractQueue, simply use that as your internal data type and you should have a flexible implementation running in virtually no time :-)

UPDATE:

As outlined below, there are two open implementations available (this answer is quite old, folks!), see this answer for details.

  • 4
    Use Queue instead of AbstractQueue... there may be queues that implement the interface but do not extend the abstract class. – TofuBeer Dec 26 '09 at 17:40
  • of course, didn't think of that! – moritz Dec 26 '09 at 21:06
  • 1
    In Python you can use a collection.deque with a specified maxlen. – Jonas Gröger Feb 10 '14 at 15:50
  • 2
    UPDATE There are now two such classes available. No need to write your own. See my answer on this page. – Basil Bourque Feb 11 '14 at 10:22
  • Thanks Basil, added your answer as a reference. – moritz Jun 25 '15 at 13:51
102

Actually the LinkedHashMap does exactly what you want. You need to override the removeEldestEntry method.

Example for a queue with max 10 elements:

  queue = new LinkedHashMap<Integer, String>()
  {
     @Override
     protected boolean removeEldestEntry(Map.Entry<Integer, String> eldest)
     {
        return this.size() > 10;   
     }
  };

If the "removeEldestEntry" returns true, the eldest entry is removed from the map.

  • I've used this pattern before and it works well. – matt b Dec 26 '09 at 17:40
  • 2
    this actually doesn't do what a queue does, how can I retrieve the newest. object? – Alex Jan 15 '18 at 15:19
58

Yes, Two

From my own duplicate question with this correct answer, I learned of two:

I made productive use of the Guava EvictingQueue, worked well.

  • ...and if you can't use Commons Collection 4.0 then CircularFifoBuffer seems to be similar to CircularFifoQueue in v 3.0. – Sridhar-Sarnobat Mar 9 '17 at 4:41
  • CircularFifoQueue link is dead, use instead commons.apache.org/proper/commons-collections/apidocs/org/… – user7294900 Oct 22 '18 at 12:47
  • @user7294900 Thanks, link fixed. FYI, Stack Overflow invites you to make such edits directly to an Answer yourself. Anyone can edit, not just the original author. Stack Overflow is intended to more like Wikipedia in that regard. – Basil Bourque Oct 22 '18 at 16:38
  • @BasilBourque yes, but such edits can be rejected even by me when changing links it's a gray area – user7294900 Oct 22 '18 at 16:41
15

I just implemented a fixed size queue this way:

public class LimitedSizeQueue<K> extends ArrayList<K> {

    private int maxSize;

    public LimitedSizeQueue(int size){
        this.maxSize = size;
    }

    public boolean add(K k){
        boolean r = super.add(k);
        if (size() > maxSize){
            removeRange(0, size() - maxSize - 1);
        }
        return r;
    }

    public K getYoungest() {
        return get(size() - 1);
    }

    public K getOldest() {
        return get(0);
    }
}
  • Thank you Sir! I was using the Apache commons library only for the Circular Queue class. Now I can get rid of the library import :) – Georgi Koemdzhiev Feb 26 '17 at 11:34
  • It should be removeRange(0, size() - maxSize) – Ahmed Hegazy Feb 21 '18 at 12:08
  • @AhmedHegazy removeRange(0, size() - maxSize - 1) is correct – Ashish Doneriya Mar 27 at 7:45
6

This is what I did with Queue wrapped with LinkedList, It is fixed sized which I give in here is 2;

public static Queue<String> pageQueue;

pageQueue = new LinkedList<String>(){
            private static final long serialVersionUID = -6707803882461262867L;

            public boolean add(String object) {
                boolean result;
                if(this.size() < 2)
                    result = super.add(object);
                else
                {
                    super.removeFirst();
                    result = super.add(object);
                }
                return result;
            }
        };


....
TMarket.pageQueue.add("ScreenOne");
....
TMarket.pageQueue.add("ScreenTwo");
.....
4

I think what you're describing is a circular queue. Here is an example and here is a better one

3

This class does the job using composition instead of inheritance (other answers here) which removes the possibility of certain side-effects (as covered by Josh Bloch in Essential Java). Trimming of the underlying LinkedList occurs on the methods add,addAll and offer.

import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.Queue;

public class LimitedQueue<T> implements Queue<T>, Iterable<T> {

    private final int limit;
    private final LinkedList<T> list = new LinkedList<T>();

    public LimitedQueue(int limit) {
        this.limit = limit;
    }

    private boolean trim() {
        boolean changed = list.size() > limit;
        while (list.size() > limit) {
            list.remove();
        }
        return changed;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(T o) {
        boolean changed = list.add(o);
        boolean trimmed = trim();
        return changed || trimmed;
    }

    @Override
    public int size() {
        return list.size();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isEmpty() {
        return list.isEmpty();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean contains(Object o) {
        return list.contains(o);
    }

    @Override
    public Iterator<T> iterator() {
        return list.iterator();
    }

    @Override
    public Object[] toArray() {
        return list.toArray();
    }

    @Override
    public <T> T[] toArray(T[] a) {
        return list.toArray(a);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean remove(Object o) {
        return list.remove(o);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean containsAll(Collection<?> c) {
        return list.containsAll(c);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean addAll(Collection<? extends T> c) {
        boolean changed = list.addAll(c);
        boolean trimmed = trim();
        return changed || trimmed;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean removeAll(Collection<?> c) {
        return list.removeAll(c);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean retainAll(Collection<?> c) {
        return list.retainAll(c);
    }

    @Override
    public void clear() {
        list.clear();
    }

    @Override
    public boolean offer(T e) {
        boolean changed = list.offer(e);
        boolean trimmed = trim();
        return changed || trimmed;
    }

    @Override
    public T remove() {
        return list.remove();
    }

    @Override
    public T poll() {
        return list.poll();
    }

    @Override
    public T element() {
        return list.element();
    }

    @Override
    public T peek() {
        return list.peek();
    }
}
2
public class CircularQueue<E> extends LinkedList<E> {
    private int capacity = 10;

    public CircularQueue(int capacity){
        this.capacity = capacity;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean add(E e) {
        if(size() >= capacity)
            removeFirst();
        return super.add(e);
    }
}

Usage and test result:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    CircularQueue<String> queue = new CircularQueue<>(3);
    queue.add("a");
    queue.add("b");
    queue.add("c");
    System.out.println(queue.toString());   //[a, b, c]

    String first = queue.pollFirst();       //a
    System.out.println(queue.toString());   //[b,c]

    queue.add("d");
    queue.add("e");
    queue.add("f");
    System.out.println(queue.toString());   //[d, e, f]
}
0

Sounds like an ordinary List where the add method contains an extra snippet which truncates the list if it gets too long.

If that is too simple, then you probably need to edit your problem description.

  • Actually, he would need to delete the first element (i.e. earliest), truncating would remove the last element. Still practical with a LinkedList. – MAK Dec 26 '09 at 19:10
0

Also see this SO question, or ArrayBlockingQueue (be careful about blocking, this might be unwanted in your case).

0

It is not quite clear what requirements you have that led you to ask this question. If you need a fixed size data structure, you might also want to look at different caching policies. However, since you have a queue, my best guess is that you're looking for some type of router functionality. In that case, I would go with a ring buffer: an array that has a first and last index. Whenever an element is added, you just increment the last element index, and when an element is removed, increment the first element index. In both cases, addition is performed modulo the array size, and make sure to increment the other index when needed, that is, when the queue is full or empty.

Also, if it is a router-type application, you might also want to experiment with an algorithm such as Random Early Dropping (RED), which drops elements from the queue randomly even before it gets filled up. In some cases, RED has been found to have better overall performance than the simple method of allowing the queue to fill up before dropping.

0

Actually you can write your own impl based on LinkedList, it is quite straight forward, just override the add method and do the staff.

0

I think the best matching answer is from this other question.

Apache commons collections 4 has a CircularFifoQueue which is what you are looking for. Quoting the javadoc:

CircularFifoQueue is a first-in first-out queue with a fixed size that replaces its oldest element if full.

0

A Simple solution, below is a Queue of "String"

LinkedHashMap<Integer, String> queue;
int queueKeysCounter;

queue.put(queueKeysCounter++, "My String");
queueKeysCounter %= QUEUE_SIZE;

Note that this will not maintain the Order of the items in the Queue, but it will replace the oldest entry.

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