6

Can anyone tell me how to insert chr to every character in the first column.

file in

1 34566 34765    
2 45678 45789
3 34567 34799
X 67895 66900
Y 34567 34890

file out

chr1 34566 34765
chr2 45678 45789
chr3 34567 34799
chrX 67895 66900
chrY 34567 34890

I can't figure out how to make sed -i apply to a specific column. I'm not good with the syntax so if you could break down your explanation I would be grateful. Also, would it be better to use awk for this?

  • If the title brought you here because you want to replace at some specific column that is not the first, use a regex that makes a group starting at the beginning of the line and matching a specific number of any-character, like this: echo internal | sed '1s/^\(.\{5\}\)/\1natio/' which turns internal into international on the first line. – TamaMcGlinn Sep 5 at 7:57
16

With sed:

sed 's/^/chr/' file.in > file.out

You don't need the -i-flag because you aren't overwriting the input-file file.in.

With awk:

awk '{print "chr"$0}' file.in > file.out
3
sed 's|^|chr|' file_in > file_out

This does a substitution (s) at the beginning of each line (^) and replacing it with the characters "chr". The pipes (|) are just separators.

1

With awk:

awk '{print "chr"$0}' file 

To store the changes back to the file:

awk '{print "chr"$0}' file > tmp && mv tmp file
  • Why do you use the && and not ; and why do you use the tmp-file at all? – EverythingRightPlace Oct 28 '13 at 22:52
  • Using && ensures that the file is only overwritten if the previous command succeeds. You cannot do command file > file, this is called clobbing, the shell will empty the file first meaning you will be left with a empty file. – Chris Seymour Oct 28 '13 at 23:21
  • I understand the clobbing part. But the only difference from command file > tmp ; mv tmp file to command file > tmp && mv tmp file is the error message I am getting from the former when awk can't succeed? – EverythingRightPlace Oct 29 '13 at 8:15
0
sed 's/^\s*/chr/'

just to be sur that no white space are before you object. If you are sur of, no need of th \s

0
awk '{print "chr"$0}'

Works for the file in question because there are no field separators. For that case you can use (for a pipe delimited file for instance):

awk 'BEGIN { FS = "|";OFS="|"} {$97="chr"$0;print}' 
0

$ cat file.in 1 34566 34765 2 45678 45789 3 34567 34799 X 67895 66900 Y 34567 34890

$ awk '$1="chr"$1 {print}' file.in chr1 34566 34765 chr2 45678 45789 chr3 34567 34799 chrX 67895 66900 chrY 34567 34890

In essence, you are redirecting value of "chr"$1 back to $1 regardless if there are spaces before column 1 or not and still print out the rest of the line.

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