Here is the problem: Declare type and define a function that takes 2 positive numbers (say m and n) as input, and raise m to the power of n. please use recursion only. Don’t use power operator or library function, just use recursion.

this is my code so far:

sqr :: Int -> Int -> Int

sqr m n

   | m > 0 && n > 0   = sqr (m * m) (n - 1)
   | otherwise        = m

For some reason, when I do sqr 10 2, it gives me like 1000 or something. Does anyone know what I'm doing wrong?

  • Instead of making a sqr function and forming a pow function with it (if that is what you are trying to do), make a pow function and let sqr be a special case when n = 2. – Dair Oct 29 '13 at 1:15

Let's expand. Also, your function should be called pow, not sqr, but that is not really important.

sqr 10 2 = sqr (10 * 10) (2 - 1)
         = sqr 100 1
         = sqr (100 * 100) (1 - 1)
         = sqr 10000 0
         = 10000

This demonstrates why sqr 10 2 = 10000.

Every time you recurse, there's a different value for m. So you need to take that into account some way:

  1. Either you write a version that works even though m has a different value each time, or,

  2. You find a way to keep the original value of m around.

I would say that the simplest method uses the fact that m^n = m * m^(n-1), and m^0 = 1.

If you're clever, there's a method that's much faster, which also relies on the fact that m^2n = (m^n)^2.

Spoilers

Some of those mathematical formulas I wrote above are actually valid Haskell code.

import Prelude hiding ((^))
infixr 8 ^
(^) :: Int -> Int -> Int
-- Do these two lines look familiar?
m^0 = 1
m^n = m * m^(n-1)

This is just the infix version of the function. You can change the infix operator to a normal function,

pow :: Int -> Int -> Int
pow m 0 = 1
pow m n = m * pow m (n - 1)

And the faster version:

pow :: Int -> Int -> Int
pow m 0 = 1
pow m n
  | even n = x * x where x = pow m (n `quot` 2)
  | otherwise = m * pow m (n - 1)
  • +1, but I think you mean "This demonstrates why sqr 10 2 = 10000." – j_random_hacker Oct 29 '13 at 1:12
  • Quite right. Fixed. – Dietrich Epp Oct 29 '13 at 1:14
  • I guess I don't understand how to code this. I understand the mathematical equation for this. I am new to haskell and still not used to the whole recursion thing. How can I code this is my function takes two integers? – user2921302 Oct 29 '13 at 1:40
  • Look closely at the two statements: m^n = m * m^(n-1) and m^0 = 1. They almost look like valid Haskell code, don't they? – Dietrich Epp Oct 29 '13 at 2:22
  • Yeah, but it doesn't use recursion (recall the function) – user2921302 Oct 29 '13 at 3:26

There are 2 separate problems here. Just write out all the term-rewriting steps to see what they are:

sqr 10 2
sqr (10 * 10) (2 - 1)
sqr 100 (2 - 1)
sqr 100 1
sqr (100 * 100) (1 - 1)
sqr 10000 (1 - 1)
sqr 10000 0
10000

This will show you one of the problems clearly. If you don't see the other one yet, try starting with

sqr 10 3

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