35

I have list of categories:

╔════╦═════════════╦═════════════╗
║ Id ║ Name        ║ Parent_id   ║
╠════╬═════════════╬═════════════╣
║ 1  ║ Sports      ║ 0           ║
║ 2  ║ Balls       ║ 1           ║
║ 3  ║ Shoes       ║ 1           ║
║ 4  ║ Electronics ║ 0           ║
║ 5  ║ Cameras     ║ 4           ║
║ 6  ║ Lenses      ║ 5           ║
║ 7  ║ Tripod      ║ 5           ║
║ 8  ║ Computers   ║ 4           ║
║ 9  ║ Laptops     ║ 8           ║
║ 10 ║ Empty       ║ 0           ║
║ -1 ║ Broken      ║ 999         ║
╚════╩═════════════╩═════════════╝ 

Each category have a parent. When parent is 0 - that means it's the root category.

What is the nicest way to convert it to tree structure like below?

enter image description here

In other words - how to bring data from this structure:

class category
{
    public int Id;
    public int ParentId;
    public string Name;
}

Into this one:

class category
{
    public int Id;
    public int ParentId;
    public string Name;

    public List<Category> Subcategories;
}

in universal way? // Universal means not only for mentioned class.

Do you have some smart ideas? ;)


Data:

var categories = new List<category>() {
    new category(1, "Sport", 0),
    new category(2, "Balls", 1),
    new category(3, "Shoes", 1),
    new category(4, "Electronics", 0),
    new category(5, "Cameras", 4),
    new category(6, "Lenses", 5),  
    new category(7, "Tripod", 5), 
    new category(8, "Computers", 4),
    new category(9, "Laptops", 8),
    new category(10, "Empty", 0),
    new category(-1, "Broken", 999),
};
38

If you want to have universal method you''ll need an additional class:

public class TreeItem<T>
{
    public T Item { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<TreeItem<T>> Children { get; set; }
}

Then use it with this helper:

internal static class GenericHelpers
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Generates tree of items from item list
    /// </summary>
    /// 
    /// <typeparam name="T">Type of item in collection</typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="K">Type of parent_id</typeparam>
    /// 
    /// <param name="collection">Collection of items</param>
    /// <param name="id_selector">Function extracting item's id</param>
    /// <param name="parent_id_selector">Function extracting item's parent_id</param>
    /// <param name="root_id">Root element id</param>
    /// 
    /// <returns>Tree of items</returns>
    public static IEnumerable<TreeItem<T>> GenerateTree<T, K>(
        this IEnumerable<T> collection,
        Func<T, K> id_selector,
        Func<T, K> parent_id_selector,
        K root_id = default(K))
    {
        foreach (var c in collection.Where(c => parent_id_selector(c).Equals(root_id)))
        {
            yield return new TreeItem<T>
            {
                Item = c,
                Children = collection.GenerateTree(id_selector, parent_id_selector, id_selector(c))
            };
        }
    }
}

Usage:

var root = categories.GenerateTree(c => c.Id, c => c.ParentId);

Testing:

static void Test(IEnumerable<TreeItem<category>> categories, int deep = 0)
{
    foreach (var c in categories)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(new String('\t', deep) + c.Item.Name);
        Test(c.Children, deep + 1);
    }
}
// ...
Test(root);

Output

Sport
    Balls
    Shoes
Electronics
    Cameras
        Lenses  
        Tripod
    Computers
        Laptops
Empty
  • 3
    It's better to compare ids via EqualityComparer<TId>.Default.Equals(parentIDSelector(c), rootID) to prevent NRE if rootId is null. – Alexey Korovin Sep 24 '15 at 13:13
  • Extremely useful class and functions. I'll checkout your github for others. – rolls Jun 29 '17 at 0:06
  • I like your solution but how can i go deep into the tree? say that i have 7 levels and i want to go through all the items and childrens ? – Kob_24 Apr 27 '18 at 23:46
  • @Kob_24 The structure you have now it's some kind of tree, where instead of heaving left and right node, you have list of children. So basically you are starting with root which is actually list. So you need to somehow pick element. Let's say it will be first. Then you are able to choose between Item and Childerens. So you could again go for Children list, but this time you will chose a child with ID = 23. From this query you need to get an Item. It will look like this: root.First().Children.First(x=>x.Item.Id == 23).Item. Ofc Instead of Item you could go deeper with next Children list. – titol May 29 '18 at 19:39
  • When using it , I get an error saying : List<category> does not contain a definition for GenerateTree, and no accesible extension method GenerateTree accepting a first argument of type List<category>. I already added the namespace – Flezcano Jun 29 at 5:43
20
foreach (var cat in categories)
{
    cat.Subcategories = categories.Where(child => child.ParentId == cat.Id)
                                  .ToList();
}

You'll get O(n*n) complexity.


More optimized way is to use Lookup tables:

var childsHash = categories.ToLookup(cat => cat.ParentId);

foreach (var cat in categories)
{
    cat.Subcategories = childsHash[cat.Id].ToList();
}

Which gives you O(2*n)O(n)

As result, you'll have next structure (shown from LinqPad):

enter image description here

  • 3
    How does LINQ solve the problem where there are multiple levels of children? – slugster Oct 29 '13 at 1:44
  • 3
    Why doing it complicated, if it's plain simple ;) – igrimpe Oct 29 '13 at 3:30
  • In order to avoid duplicates you would need only first level nodes: categories.Where(n => n.ParentId == 0) – mykhailovskyi Apr 16 '18 at 20:51
5

Yet another way with passing how to identify parent. Full code (including internal implementation of ITree and xUnit test) is available as Gist here: Nice & universal way to convert List of items to Tree

Usage:

ITree<Category> tree = categories.ToTree((parent, child) => child.ParentId == parent.Id);

Proiduces:

        <ROOT>
        -Sports
        --Balls
        --Shoes
        -Electronics
        --Cameras
        ---Lenses
        ---Tripod
        --Computers
        ---Laptops
        -Empty
        -Broken

Universal tree node interface:

public interface ITree<T>
{
    T Data { get; }
    ITree<T> Parent { get; }
    ICollection<ITree<T>> Children { get; }
    bool IsRoot { get; }
    bool IsLeaf { get; }
    int Level { get; }
}

Extension method for collection:

public static ITree<T> ToTree<T>(this IList<T> items, Func<T, T, bool> parentSelector)
{
    if (items == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(items));

    var lookup = items.ToLookup(
            item => items.FirstOrDefault(parent => parentSelector(parent, item)),
            child => child);

    return Tree<T>.FromLookup(lookup);
}
3

You can use below database query to get the list of categories with parent-child relations:

WITH tree (categoryId, parentId, level, categoryName, rn) as 
(
   SELECT categoryId, parentid, 0 as level, categoryName,

       convert(varchar(max),right(row_number() over (order by categoryId),10)) rn
   FROM Categories
   WHERE parentid = 0

   UNION ALL

   SELECT c2.categoryId, c2.parentid, tree.level + 1, c2.categoryName,

       rn + '/' + convert(varchar(max),right(row_number() over 
       (order by tree.categoryId),10))
   FROM Categories c2 

     INNER JOIN tree ON tree.categoryId = c2.parentid
)

SELECT *
FROM tree
order by RN

I hope this will help you out.

1

Here is a little example I whipped up. It's pretty "Generic".

One could also make a generic approach by defining an interface (which would then allow the function arguments to be simplified) - however, I chose not to do so. In any case, the "mapper" and selector functions allows this it work across distinct types.

Also note that this is not a very efficient implementation (as it keeps around all possible children for all subtrees and repeatedly iterates such), but may be suitable for the given task. In the past I have also used a Dictionary<key,collection> approach, which has better bounds, but I didn't feel like writing it that way :)

This runs as a "LINQPad C# Program". Enjoy!

// F - flat type
// H - hiearchial type
IEnumerable<H> MakeHierarchy<F,H>(
    // Remaining items to process
    IEnumerable<F> flat,
    // Current "parent" to look for
    object parentKey,
    // Find key for given F-type
    Func<F,object> key,
    // Convert between types
    Func<F,IEnumerable<H>,H> mapper,
    // Should this be added as immediate child?
    Func<F,object,bool> isImmediateChild) {

    var remainder = flat.Where(f => !isImmediateChild(f, parentKey))
        .ToList();

    return flat
        .Where(f => isImmediateChild(f, parentKey))
        .Select(f => {
            var children = MakeHierarchy(remainder, key(f), key, mapper, isImmediateChild);
            return mapper(f, children);
        });
}

class category1
{
    public int Id;
    public int ParentId;
    public string Name;

    public category1(int id, string name, int parentId) {
        Id = id;
        Name = name;
        ParentId = parentId;
    }
};

class category2
{
    public int Id;
    public int ParentId;
    public string Name;

    public IEnumerable<category2> Subcategories;
};

List<category1> categories = new List<category1>() {
    new category1(1, "Sport", 0),
    new category1(2, "Balls", 1),
    new category1(3, "Shoes", 1),
    new category1(4, "Electronics", 0),
    new category1(5, "Cameras", 4),
    new category1(6, "Lenses", 5),  
    new category1(7, "Tripod", 5), 
    new category1(8, "Computers", 4),
    new category1(9, "Laptops", 8),
    new category1(10, "Empty", 0),
    new category1(-1, "Broken", 999),
};

object KeyForCategory (category1 c1) {
    return c1.Id;
}

category2 MapCategories (category1 c1, IEnumerable<category2> subs) {
    return new category2 {
        Id = c1.Id,
        Name = c1.Name,
        ParentId = c1.ParentId,
        Subcategories = subs,
    };
}

bool IsImmediateChild (category1 c1, object id) {
    return c1.ParentId.Equals(id);
}

void Main()
{
    var h = MakeHierarchy<category1,category2>(categories, 0,
        // These make it "Generic". You can use lambdas or whatever;
        // here I am using method groups.
        KeyForCategory, MapCategories, IsImmediateChild);
    h.Dump();
}
  • 1
    Aww, please do please explain the downvote - I'd like to know how I can improve [this post]. – user2864740 Oct 29 '13 at 3:24
0

using Ilya Ivanov algorithm (see above), i made the method more generic.

public static IEnumerable<TJ> GenerateTree<T, TK, TJ>(this IEnumerable<T> items,
                                                      Func<T, TK> idSelector,
                                                      Func<T, TK> parentSelector,
                                                      Func<T, IEnumerable<T>, TJ> outSelector)
{
       IList<T> mlist = items.ToList();

       ILookup<TK, T> mcl = mlist.ToLookup(parentSelector);

       return mlist.Select(cat => outSelector(cat, mcl[idSelector(cat)]));
}

usage :

IEnumerable<Category> mlc = GenerateTree(categories,
                                         c => c.Id, 
                                         c => c.ParentId,
                                         (c, ci) => new Category
                                         {
                                              Id = c.Id,
                                              Name = c.Name,
                                              ParentId = c.ParentId ,
                                              Subcategories = ci
                                         });
  • 1
    This does not work. It will only create one level of children – hewstone Nov 9 '16 at 19:42
  • 1
    This does not work, it does not remove the children from parent node – Rajmond Burgaj Sep 30 '18 at 19:50
-1

Using Ilya Ivanov and Damian Drygiel solutions, I've written some code, that makes a tree with any collection and any levels of children, even if you exactly don't know, what nodes will be roots.

Tree node entry

public sealed class TreeNode<T, TKey>
{
    public T Item { get; set; }
    public TKey ParentId { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<TreeNode<T, TKey>> Children { get; set; }
}

Extension methods

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<TreeNode<T, TKey>> ToTree<T, TKey>(
        this IList<T> collection,
        Func<T, TKey> itemIdSelector,
        Func<T, TKey> parentIdSelector)
    {
        var rootNodes = new List<TreeNode<T, TKey>>();
        var collectionHash = collection.ToLookup(parentIdSelector);

        //find root nodes
        var parentIds = collection.Select(parentIdSelector);
        var itemIds = collection.Select(itemIdSelector);
        var rootIds = parentIds.Except(itemIds);

        foreach (var rootId in rootIds)
        {
            rootNodes.AddRange(
                GetTreeNodes(
                    itemIdSelector,
                    collectionHash,
                    rootId)
                );
        }

        return rootNodes;
    }

    private static IEnumerable<TreeNode<T, TKey>> GetTreeNodes<T, TKey>(
        Func<T, TKey> itemIdSelector,
        ILookup<TKey, T> collectionHash,
        TKey parentId)
    {
        return collectionHash[parentId].Select(collectionItem => new TreeNode<T, TKey>
        {
            ParentId = parentId,
            Item = collectionItem,
            Children = GetTreeNodes(
                itemIdSelector,
                collectionHash,
                itemIdSelector(collectionItem))
        });
    }
}

Example:

 var collection = new List<TestTreeItem>
        {
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 1, Name = "1", ParentId = 14},
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 2, Name = "2", ParentId = 0},
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 3, Name = "3", ParentId = 1},
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 4, Name = "4", ParentId = 1},
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 5, Name = "5", ParentId = 2},
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 6, Name = "6", ParentId = 2},
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 7, Name = "7", ParentId = 3},
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 8, Name = "8", ParentId = 3},
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 9, Name = "9", ParentId = 5},
            new TestTreeItem {Id = 10, Name = "10", ParentId = 7}
        };

        var tree = collection.ToTree(item => item.Id, item => item.ParentId);

Hope, it helps someone. Enjoy

  • 1
    only show parents does not populate children and sub-children and so on – Muhammad Waqas Aziz Nov 25 '18 at 5:55

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