I would like to place a "please wait, loading" spinning circle animation on my site. How should I accomplish this using jQuery?

  • 2
    Consider a PNG with CSS transformations rather than a GIF. – user142019 Jan 8 '11 at 13:18
  • 6
    @WTP What's wrong with GIFs? – Nathan Aug 16 '11 at 5:49
  • 3
    @Nathan if you have a white background, and make a gif with a white background, no problem. How about over a semi-transparent black overlay? Or if your site has several background colors? Then you have to make the gif transparent so it isn't in a white square, and you can see aliasing around the edges. Yuck. – Chris Baker Jul 21 '15 at 21:34
  • 3
    There were times when questions like these gets too many upvotes without asking What you tried? :D :P – Aishwarya Shiva Aug 31 '15 at 15:30

14 Answers 14

up vote 1098 down vote accepted

You could do this various different ways. It could be a subtle as a small status on the page saying "Loading...", or as loud as an entire element graying out the page while the new data is loading. The approach I'm taking below will show you how to accomplish both methods.

The Setup

Let's start by getting us a nice "loading" animation from http://ajaxload.info I'll be using enter image description here

Let's create an element that we can show/hide anytime we're making an ajax request:

<div class="modal"><!-- Place at bottom of page --></div>

The CSS

Next let's give it some flair:

/* Start by setting display:none to make this hidden.
   Then we position it in relation to the viewport window
   with position:fixed. Width, height, top and left speak
   for themselves. Background we set to 80% white with
   our animation centered, and no-repeating */
.modal {
    display:    none;
    position:   fixed;
    z-index:    1000;
    top:        0;
    left:       0;
    height:     100%;
    width:      100%;
    background: rgba( 255, 255, 255, .8 ) 
                url('http://i.stack.imgur.com/FhHRx.gif') 
                50% 50% 
                no-repeat;
}

/* When the body has the loading class, we turn
   the scrollbar off with overflow:hidden */
body.loading .modal {
    overflow: hidden;   
}

/* Anytime the body has the loading class, our
   modal element will be visible */
body.loading .modal {
    display: block;
}

And finally, the jQuery

Alright, on to the jQuery. This next part is actually really simple:

$body = $("body");

$(document).on({
    ajaxStart: function() { $body.addClass("loading");    },
     ajaxStop: function() { $body.removeClass("loading"); }    
});

That's it! We're attaching some events to the body element anytime the ajaxStart or ajaxStop events are fired. When an ajax event starts, we add the "loading" class to the body. and when events are done, we remove the "loading" class from the body.

See it in action: http://jsfiddle.net/VpDUG/4952/

  • 6
    This is the most in depth solution although I'd recommend you use a centering plugin which centers the preloader around a page element (i.e. body, #element, or .element) – Corey Ballou Dec 27 '09 at 1:46
  • 8
    I had to use .bind() instead of .on() as we are using jQuery 1.5.1! – renegadeMind Jul 10 '12 at 15:09
  • 12
    I love when something just works. There's a reason @JonathanSampson has 68k rep. – Mike S. Jul 11 '12 at 19:16
  • 25
    I'd recommend using the plugin that plugins to the plugins to make sure they're all plugged in. – contactmatt Sep 12 '12 at 21:25
  • 14
    Note: As of jQuery 1.8, the .ajaxStop() and .ajaxStart() method should only be attached to document. docs – balexandre Nov 21 '13 at 8:42

As far as the actual loading image, check out this site for a bunch of options.

As far as displaying a DIV with this image when a request begins, you have a few choices:

A) Manually show and hide the image:

$('#form').submit(function() {
    $('#wait').show();
    $.post('/whatever.php', function() {
        $('#wait').hide();
    });
    return false;
});

B) Use ajaxStart and ajaxComplete:

$('#wait').ajaxStart(function() {
    $(this).show();
}).ajaxComplete(function() {
    $(this).hide();
});

Using this the element will show/hide for any request. Could be good or bad, depending on the need.

C) Use individual callbacks for a particular request:

$('#form').submit(function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: '/whatever.php',
        beforeSend: function() { $('#wait').show(); },
        complete: function() { $('#wait').hide(); }
    });
    return false;
});
  • 3
    Something to note: if you cant modify the HTML to add the loading img element, you can do it as a background-image on the button using CSS e.g. input.loading-gif{background:url('images/loading.gif');} and then apply the class with jQuery e.g. $('#mybutton').addClass('loading-gif'); The only gotcha is that this will only request the gif when the submit button is clicked, which is normally too late, so you need to pre-cache it, which is easy with jQuery e.g. (new Image()).src = "images/loading.gif"; – jackocnr Feb 23 '11 at 16:27
  • 3
    This site has a larger and in my opinion nicer selection of loaders with more customization options preloaders.net – rorypicko Dec 22 '13 at 19:35
  • FYI: merged from stackoverflow.com/questions/750358/… – Shog9 Jul 25 '14 at 19:55

Along with what Jonathan and Samir suggested (both excellent answers btw!), jQuery has some built in events that it'll fire for you when making an ajax request.

There's the ajaxStart event

Show a loading message whenever an AJAX request starts (and none is already active).

...and it's brother, the ajaxStop event

Attach a function to be executed whenever all AJAX requests have ended. This is an Ajax Event.

Together, they make a fine way to show a progress message when any ajax activity is happening anywhere on the page.

HTML:

<div id="loading">
  <p><img src="loading.gif" /> Please Wait</p>
</div>

Script:

$(document).ajaxStart(function(){
    $('#loading').show();
 }).ajaxStop(function(){
    $('#loading').hide();
 });
  • This is outdated, as of 1.8.0, .ajaxStart can only be attached to document, ie. $(document).ajaxStart(function(){}). – Jonno_FTW Apr 14 '14 at 3:10
  • 1
    @Jonno_FTW fixed. Ta. Old question and answer that's been superceded by Jonathan Sampson's edits to his question, but good to keep it up to date anyway – Dan F Apr 15 '14 at 22:06
  • 2
    Jonathan's answer was very in-dept, but this for me was the best for its simplicity. – ojonugwa ochalifu May 13 '14 at 8:01

You can grab an animated GIF of a spinning circle from Ajaxload - stick that somewhere in your website file heirarchy. Then you just need to add an HTML element with the correct code, and remove it when you're done. This is fairly simple:

function showLoadingImage() {
    $('#yourParentElement').append('<div id="loading-image"><img src="path/to/loading.gif" alt="Loading..." /></div>');
}

function hideLoadingImage() {
    $('#loading-image').remove();
}

You then just need to use these methods in your AJAX call:

$.load(
     'http://example.com/myurl',
     { 'random': 'data': 1: 2, 'dwarfs': 7},
     function (responseText, textStatus, XMLHttpRequest) {
         hideLoadingImage();
     }
);

// this will be run immediately after the AJAX call has been made,
// not when it completes.
showLoadingImage();

This has a few caveats: first of all, if you have two or more places the loading image can be shown, you're going to need to kep track of how many calls are running at once somehow, and only hide when they're all done. This can be done using a simple counter, which should work for almost all cases.

Secondly, this will only hide the loading image on a successful AJAX call. To handle the error states, you'll need to look into $.ajax, which is more complex than $.load, $.get and the like, but a lot more flexible too.

  • 1
    Thanks for the reply. But tell me, why do I need to use AJAX at all? Can't I simply track down it all in the page itself? – thedp Dec 27 '09 at 23:18
  • What exactly do you want to track? Unless you're requesting information after the page has loaded (and AJAX is pretty much the only way to do that without using a plugin), why would you need a "loading" image at all? – Samir Talwar Dec 28 '09 at 2:39
  • Samir Talwar: A heavy JavaScript application actually. Thanks, I get the idea. – thedp Dec 28 '09 at 6:09
  • Understandable. In that case, just call showLoadingImage before you start and hideLoadingImage after you finish. Should be fairly simple. You may need to stick some sort of setTimeout call in to make sure the browser actually renders the new <img> tag though - I've seen a couple of cases where it doesn't bother until the JavaScript has finished executing. – Samir Talwar Dec 28 '09 at 15:38

Jonathon's excellent solution breaks in IE8 (the animation does not show at all). To fix this, change the CSS to:

.modal {
display:    none;
position:   fixed;
z-index:    1000;
top:        0;
left:       0;
height:     100%;
width:      100%;
background: rgba( 255, 255, 255, .8 ) 
            url('http://i.stack.imgur.com/FhHRx.gif') 
            50% 50% 
            no-repeat;
opacity: 0.80;
-ms-filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(Opacity = 80);
filter: alpha(opacity = 80)};
  • 1
    Edited because the multiple 'background-' lines didn't work, but the single background statement works correctly. – Maurice Flanagan Sep 9 '12 at 14:03

jQuery provides event hooks for when AJAX requests start and end. You can hook into these to show your loader.

For example, create the following div:

<div id="spinner">
  <img src="images/spinner.gif" alt="Loading" />
</div>

Set it to display: none in your stylesheets. You can style it whatever way you want to. You can generate a nice loading image at Ajaxload.info, if you want to.

Then, you can use something like the following to make it be shown automatically when sending Ajax requests:

$(document).ready(function () {

    $('#spinner').bind("ajaxSend", function() {
        $(this).show();
    }).bind("ajaxComplete", function() {
        $(this).hide();
    });

});

Simply add this Javascript block to the end of your page before closing your body tag or wherever you see fit.

Now, whenever you send Ajax requests, the #spinner div will be shown. When the request is complete, it'll be hidden again.

  • Can someone please explain what AJAX has to do with this? Can't I simply manage this all within the page without accessing the server with AJAX... Or am I missing here something? Thanks. – thedp Dec 27 '09 at 23:24
  • 3
    Ah - as I understood, you wanted a loading image to be shown whenever you were making AJAX requests. If you simply want a "please wait, loading..." animation to be shown until the page has fully loaded, you could have a loading div in the page and then hide it in your $(document).ready block. – Veeti Dec 27 '09 at 23:33

If you are using Turbolinks With Rails this is my solution:

This is the CoffeeScript

$(window).on 'page:fetch', ->
  $('body').append("<div class='modal'></div>")
  $('body').addClass("loading")

$(window).on 'page:change', ->
  $('body').removeClass("loading")

This is the SASS CSS based on the first excellent answer from Jonathan Sampson

# loader.css.scss

.modal {
    display:    none;
    position:   fixed;
    z-index:    1000;
    top:        0;
    left:       0;
    height:     100%;
    width:      100%;
    background: rgba( 255, 255, 255, 0.4)
            asset-url('ajax-loader.gif', image)
            50% 50% 
            no-repeat;
}
body.loading {
    overflow: hidden;   
}

body.loading .modal {
    display: block;
}

Like Mark H said the blockUI is the way.

Ex.:

<script type="text/javascript" src="javascript/jquery/jquery.blockUI.js"></script>
<script>
// unblock when ajax activity stops
$(document).ajaxStop($.unblockUI); 

$("#downloadButton").click(function() {

    $("#dialog").dialog({
        width:"390px",
        modal:true,
        buttons: {
            "OK, AGUARDO O E-MAIL!":  function() {
                $.blockUI({ message: '<img src="img/ajax-loader.gif" />' });
                send();
            }
        }
    });
});

function send() {
    $.ajax({
        url: "download-enviar.do",          
        type: "POST",
        blablabla
    });
}
</script>

Obs.: I got the ajax-loader.gif on http://www.ajaxload.info/

With all due respect to other posts, you have here a very simple solution, using CSS3 and jQuery, without using any further external resources nor files.

$('#submit').click(function(){
  $(this).addClass('button_loader').attr("value","");
  window.setTimeout(function(){
    $('#submit').removeClass('button_loader').attr("value","\u2713");
    $('#submit').prop('disabled', true);
  }, 3000);
});
#submit:focus{
  outline:none;
  outline-offset: none;
}

.button {
    display: inline-block;
    padding: 6px 12px;
    margin: 20px 8px;
    font-size: 14px;
    font-weight: 400;
    line-height: 1.42857143;
    text-align: center;
    white-space: nowrap;
    vertical-align: middle;
    -ms-touch-action: manipulation;
    cursor: pointer;
    -webkit-user-select: none;
    -moz-user-select: none;
    -ms-user-select: none;
    background-image: none;
    border: 2px solid transparent;
    border-radius: 5px;
    color: #000;
    background-color: #b2b2b2;
    border-color: #969696;
}

.button_loader {
  background-color: transparent;
  border: 4px solid #f3f3f3;
  border-radius: 50%;
  border-top: 4px solid #969696;
  border-bottom: 4px solid #969696;
  width: 35px;
  height: 35px;
  -webkit-animation: spin 0.8s linear infinite;
  animation: spin 0.8s linear infinite;
}

@-webkit-keyframes spin {
  0% { -webkit-transform: rotate(0deg); }
  99% { -webkit-transform: rotate(360deg); }
}

@keyframes spin {
  0% { transform: rotate(0deg); }
  99% { transform: rotate(360deg); }
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<input id="submit" class="button" type="submit" value="Submit" />

note that when using asp.net mvc, with "using (Ajax.BeginForm(..." setting the "ajaxStart" will not work.

use the ajaxotions to overcome this issue:

(Ajax.BeginForm("ActionName", new AjaxOptions { OnBegin = "uiOfProccessingAjaxAction", OnComplete = "uiOfProccessingAjaxActionComplete" }))

This would make the buttons disappear, then an animation of "loading" would appear in their place and finally just display a success message.

$(function(){
    $('#submit').click(function(){
        $('#submit').hide();
        $("#form .buttons").append('<img src="assets/img/loading.gif" alt="Loading..." id="loading" />');
        $.post("sendmail.php",
                {emailFrom: nameVal, subject: subjectVal, message: messageVal},
                function(data){
                    jQuery("#form").slideUp("normal", function() {                 
                        $("#form").before('<h1>Success</h1><p>Your email was sent.</p>');
                    });
                }
        );
    });
});

Most of the solutions I have seen either expects us to design a loading overlay, keep it hidden and then unhide it when required, or, show a gif or image etc.

I wanted to develop robust a plugin where with a simply jQuery call I can display the loading screen and tear it down when the task is completed.

Below is the code. It depends on Font awesome and jQuery:

/**
 * Raj: Used basic sources from here: http://jsfiddle.net/eys3d/741/
 **/


(function($){
    // Retain count concept: http://stackoverflow.com/a/2420247/260665
    // Callers should make sure that for every invocation of loadingSpinner method there has to be an equivalent invocation of removeLoadingSpinner
    var retainCount = 0;

    // http://stackoverflow.com/a/13992290/260665 difference between $.fn.extend and $.extend
    $.extend({
        loadingSpinner: function() {
            // add the overlay with loading image to the page
            var over = '<div id="custom-loading-overlay">' +
                '<i id="custom-loading" class="fa fa-spinner fa-spin fa-3x fa-fw" style="font-size:48px; color: #470A68;"></i>'+
                '</div>';
            if (0===retainCount) {
                $(over).appendTo('body');
            }
            retainCount++;
        },
        removeLoadingSpinner: function() {
            retainCount--;
            if (retainCount<=0) {
                $('#custom-loading-overlay').remove();
                retainCount = 0;
            }
        }
    });
}(jQuery)); 

Just put the above in a js file and include it throughout the project.

Invocation:

$.loadingSpinner();
$.removeLoadingSpinner();

Per https://www.w3schools.com/howto/howto_css_loader.asp, this is a 2-step process with no JS:

1.Add this HTML where you want the spinner: <div class="loader"></div>

2.Add this CSS to make the actual spinner:

.loader {
    border: 16px solid #f3f3f3; /* Light grey */
    border-top: 16px solid #3498db; /* Blue */
    border-radius: 50%;
    width: 120px;
    height: 120px;
    animation: spin 2s linear infinite;
}

@keyframes spin {
    0% { transform: rotate(0deg); }
    100% { transform: rotate(360deg); }
}
  • Since the OP is using jQuery they can call $("#loader").toggle(); before making the long running request to start the animation and make another call in the callback function of the request to hide it away. – Dmitri Chubarov Apr 13 at 7:51

I use CSS3 for animation

/************ CSS3 *************/
.icon-spin {
  font-size: 1.5em;
  display: inline-block;
  animation: spin1 2s infinite linear;
}

@keyframes spin1{
    0%{transform:rotate(0deg)}
    100%{transform:rotate(359deg)}
}

/************** CSS3 cross-platform ******************/

.icon-spin-cross-platform {
  font-size: 1.5em;
  display: inline-block;
  -moz-animation: spin 2s infinite linear;
  -o-animation: spin 2s infinite linear;
  -webkit-animation: spin 2s infinite linear;
  animation: spin2 2s infinite linear;
}

@keyframes spin2{
    0%{transform:rotate(0deg)}
    100%{transform:rotate(359deg)}
}
@-moz-keyframes spin2{
    0%{-moz-transform:rotate(0deg)}
    100%{-moz-transform:rotate(359deg)}
}
@-webkit-keyframes spin2{
    0%{-webkit-transform:rotate(0deg)}
    100%{-webkit-transform:rotate(359deg)}
}
@-o-keyframes spin2{
    0%{-o-transform:rotate(0deg)}
    100%{-o-transform:rotate(359deg)}
}
@-ms-keyframes spin2{
    0%{-ms-transform:rotate(0deg)}
    100%{-ms-transform:rotate(359deg)}
}
<link href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/3.3.7/css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet"/>


<div class="row">
  <div class="col-md-6">
    Default CSS3
    <span class="glyphicon glyphicon-repeat icon-spin"></span>
  </div>
  <div class="col-md-6">
    Cross-Platform CSS3
    <span class="glyphicon glyphicon-repeat icon-spin-cross-platform"></span>
  </div>
</div>

protected by Hashem Qolami Oct 19 '14 at 17:41

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.