33

I'm very confused about what's happening. I always thought char * and char [] were interchangable, but after looking at the memory addresses it seems char * allocates space in the heap, whereas char [] is allocating memory on the stack.

char stack[] = "hello";
char *heap = "hello";

char *heap_string_malloc = malloc(5);
heap_string_malloc = "hello";

printf("Address of stack[0]: %p\n", stack);
printf("Address of heap[0]: %p\n", heap);
printf("Address of heap_string_malloc[0]: %p\n", heap_string_malloc);

Outputs the following:

Address of stack[0]: 0x7fff8b0b85b0
Address of heap[0]: 0x400760
Address of heap_string_malloc[0]: 0x400760

Does this mean that char * is dynamically allocated?

Further to my confusion, how come malloc is allocating the same memory address as what char *heap has already allocated? I'm not running any optimisation (simply gcc file.c).

5
  • 10
    char *heap_string_malloc = malloc(5); heap_string_malloc = "hello"; is an insta-memory-leak. This isn't Java. Consider this: int a=5; a=6; Where did the 5 go?
    – WhozCraig
    Oct 29, 2013 at 10:48
  • 4
    Arrays and pointers are NOT the same thing. Oct 29, 2013 at 10:49
  • "hello" also type char []. But a char * can very well point to it.
    – Sadique
    Oct 29, 2013 at 10:50
  • @EliasVanOotegem Not in the global space, no it won't. In a local space of a function as an automatic it surly will compile nicely (and leak memory as described). The warning you received was likely from assigning a const char[] address to a non-const char* pointer, which recent C compilers will warn you about (my clang will, for example).
    – WhozCraig
    Oct 29, 2013 at 11:32
  • @WhozCraig: My mistake... I've checked my code, The error I got was even more silly (in a function MyStruct **str_params I attempted to assign something along the lines of str_params->some_char_arr = some_char_ptr) which, evidently didn't work Oct 29, 2013 at 11:46

5 Answers 5

41

Arrays are not pointers. What your program is doing, line by line, is

// Allocate 6 bytes in the stack and store "hello" in them
char stack[] = "hello";

// Allocate pointer on the stack and point it to a static, read-only buffer
// containing "hello"
char *heap = "hello";

// Malloc 5 bytes (which isn't enough to hold "hello" due to the NUL byte)
char *heap_string_malloc = malloc(5);

// Reset heap_string_malloc to point to a static buffer; memory leak!
heap_string_malloc = "hello";

The reason you're seeing the same pointer twice is because the compiler optimized away the second static buffer containing "hello".

11
  • 1
    +1 And, of course it is perfectly reasonable that both static buffers containing "hello" are at the same address, so heap_string_malloc and heap could very well point to the same place.
    – mjs
    Oct 29, 2013 at 10:54
  • if he hadn't heap_string_malloc to point to "hello", but instead to a different string "hola", would it still be a memory leak? Oct 29, 2013 at 10:54
  • +1 That article drives home very well the simple fact that pointers are variables that hold addresses; arrays are variables that are addresses.
    – WhozCraig
    Oct 29, 2013 at 10:55
  • 1
    @user2018675 Of course, there's nothing magic about "hello" in C :)
    – Fred Foo
    Oct 29, 2013 at 10:55
  • 3
    @user2018675 Yes, because he still hasnt got anything pointing to the memory allocated by malloc. I like to explain it using the analogy of dogs. I buy a dog from a shop and take him to the park with him connected to a lead (leash for you americans...) . While at the park, I let him off the lead, and connect the lead to somebody elses dog and go home. I still have a dog, but not my dog. The "dog" is what malloc returned. The "lead", is heap_string_malloc. The other dog is "hello".
    – mjs
    Oct 29, 2013 at 11:03
15

When you do e.g.

char *heap = "hello";

the pointer heap actually does not point to the heap, it points to static data loaded together with the rest of program by the operating system loader. In fact, to be correct it should be

const char *heap = "hello";

as heap is pointing to a constant and read-only piece of memory.


Also, while arrays decays to (and can be used as) pointers, and pointers can be used with array syntax, they are not the same. The biggest difference being that for an array you can use e.g. sizeof to get the size in bytes of the actual array, while it's not possible for pointers.


And as a third thing, when you're doing

char *heap_string_malloc = malloc(5);
heap_string_malloc = "hello";

you have a memory leak, as you first assign something to heap_string_malloc but then directly afterward reassign heap_string_malloc to point to something completely different.


As for the reason you get the same address for both heap and heap_string_malloc it's because both points to the same literal string.

12

String literals such as "hello" are stored in such a way that they are held over the lifetime of the program. They are often stored in a separate data segment (distinct from the stack or heap) which may be read-only.

When you write

char stack[] = "hello";

you are creating a new auto ("stack") variable of type "6-element array of char" (size is taken from the length of the string literal), and the contents of the string literal "hello" are copied to it.

When you write

char *heap = "hello";

you are creating a new auto ("stack") variable of type "pointer to char", and the address of the string literal "hello" is copied to it.

Here's how it looks on my system:

       Item        Address   00   01   02   03
       ----        -------   --   --   --   --
    "hello"       0x400b70   68   65   6c   6c    hell
                  0x400b74   6f   00   22   68    o."h

      stack 0x7fffb00c7620   68   65   6c   6c    hell
            0x7fffb00c7624   6f   00   00   00    o...

       heap 0x7fffb00c7618   70   0b   40   00    p.@.
            0x7fffb00c761c   00   00   00   00    ....

      *heap       0x400b70   68   65   6c   6c    hell
                  0x400b74   6f   00   22   68    o."h

As you can see, the string literal "hello" has its own storage, starting at address 0x400b70. Both the stack ahd heap variables are created as auto ("stack") variables. stack contains a copy of the contents of the string literal, while heap contains the address of the string literal.

Now, suppose I use malloc to allocate the memory for the string and assign the result to heap:

heap = malloc( sizeof *heap * strlen( "hello" + 1 ));
strcpy( heap, "hello" );

Now my memory map looks like the following:

       Item        Address   00   01   02   03
       ----        -------   --   --   --   --
    "hello"       0x400b70   68   65   6c   6c    hell
                  0x400b74   6f   00   22   68    o."h

      stack 0x7fffb00c7620   68   65   6c   6c    hell
            0x7fffb00c7624   6f   00   00   00    o...

       heap 0x7fffb00c7618   10   10   50   00    ..P.
            0x7fffb00c761c   00   00   00   00    ....

      *heap       0x501010   68   65   6c   6c    hell
                  0x501014   6f   00   00   00    o...

The heap variable now contains a different address, which points to yet another 6-byte chunk of memory containing the string "hello".

EDIT

For byteofthat, here's the code I use to generate the above map:

dumper.h:

#ifndef DUMPER_H
#define DUMPER_H

/**
 * Dumps a memory map to the specified output stream
 *
 * Inputs:
 *
 *   names     - list of item names
 *   addrs     - list of addresses to different items
 *   lengths   - length of each item
 *   count     - number of items being dumped
 *   stream    - output destination
 *
 * Outputs: none
 * Returns: none
 */
void dumper(char **names, void **addrs, size_t *lengths, size_t count, FILE *stream);

#endif

dumper.c:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>

#include "dumper.h"

/**
 * Dumps a memory map to the specified output stream
 *
 * Inputs:
 *
 *   names     - list of item names
 *   addrs     - list of addresses to different items
 *   lengths   - length of each item
 *   count     - number of items being dumped
 *   stream    - output destination
 *
 * Outputs: none
 * Returns: none
 */
void dumper(char **names, void **addrs, size_t *lengths, size_t count, FILE *stream)
{
  size_t i;
  int maxlen = 15;

  for ( size_t j = 0; j < count; j++ )
  {
    if (strlen(names[j]) > maxlen && strlen(names[j]) < 50)
      maxlen = strlen(names[j]);
  }

  fprintf(stream,"%*s%15s%5s%5s%5s%5s\n", maxlen, "Item", "Address", "00", "01",
    "02", "03");
  fprintf(stream,"%*s%15s%5s%5s%5s%5s\n", maxlen, "----", "-------", "--", "--",
    "--", "--");

  for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
  {
    size_t j;
    char *namefield = names[i];
    unsigned char *p = (unsigned char *) addrs[i];
    for (j = 0; j < lengths[i]; j+=4)
    {
      size_t k;

      fprintf(stream,"%*.*s", maxlen, maxlen, namefield);
      fprintf(stream,"%15p", (void *) p);
      for (k = 0; k < 4; k++)
      {
        fprintf(stream,"%3s%02x", " ", p[k]);
      }
      fprintf(stream, "    ");
      for ( k = 0; k < 4; k++)
      {
        if (isgraph(p[k]))
          fprintf(stream,"%c", p[k]);
        else
          fprintf(stream, ".");
      }
      fputc('\n', stream);
      namefield = " ";
      p += 4;
    }
    fputc('\n', stream);
  }
}

And an example of how to use it:

#include <stdio.h>

#include "dumper.h"

int main(void)
{
  int x = 0;
  double y = 3.14159;
  char foo[] = "This is a test";

  void *addrs[] = {&x, &y, foo, "This is a test"};
  char *names[] = {"x", "y", "foo", "\"This is a test\""};
  size_t lengths[] = {sizeof x, sizeof y, sizeof foo, sizeof "This is a test"};

  dumper(names, addrs, lengths, 4, stdout);

  return 0;
}
1
  • How does one print out this information from a program of their own?
    – user1422456
    Sep 1, 2015 at 21:48
1

This creates an array on the stack, containing a copy of the static string "hello":

char stack[] = "hello";

This creates a pointer on the stack, containing the address of the static string "hello":

char *heap = "hello";

This creates a pointer on the stack, containing the address of a dynamically allocated buffer of 5 bytes:

char *heap_string_malloc = malloc(5);

But in all three cases, you put something on the stack. char* is not "on the heap". It is a pointer (on the stack) which points to something, somewhere.

0

"stack" is a static array of chars so it will be allocated in the stack and freed automatically once the function ends, because its size is known since its definition. While "heap" and "heap_string_malloc" are both declared as pointers to char buffers and need to be allocated dynamicly with malloc in order to define the size of their content, that's why they will reside in the heap memory. By doing:

char *heap = "hello";

and:

heap_string_malloc = "hello";

you are modifying the pointers them-self (with a static buffer value), not the content to which they're pointing. You should rather use memcpy to modify the memory pointed by the "heap_string_malloc" pointer with your data:

memcpy(heap_string_malloc, "hello", 5);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.