8

How to use the "this" keyword in the JavaScript object notation (JSON) in the example below?

{
    firstName: "Foo",
    lastName: "Bar",
    fullName: function () {
        return this.firstName + " " + this.lastName;
    }
}

The code above neither work with the this keyword nor without it. Why is that? The only working solution is to assign the JSON object to a variable and to use the variable in the code.

Is there something similar to the "this" keyword that can be used instead of it?

Any suggestions are welcome.

edit: As stated in the comments below, it's not JSON but "javascript object literal". Thank you for that hint. Nevertheless, my question still remains valid (for the javascript object literal).

invalid: The code above works as expected, thus fullName() returns "Foo Bar".

3
  • JSON is not a programming language like javascript to add functionas and expressions. You can construct the JSON string using JS.
    – Sarath
    Oct 29, 2013 at 13:10
  • 3
    That's not JSON -- it doesn't support functions. It's a "javascript object literal"
    – Dexygen
    Oct 29, 2013 at 13:10
  • 1
    JSON is for data. If it contains functions then it's not really JSON.
    – Spudley
    Oct 29, 2013 at 13:10

3 Answers 3

16

If I understand it, this actually may not be an invalid question (just a poorly asked one, with some mistakes), and is really potentially a little interesting. The JSON misnomer was an unfortunate distracting mistake, but really, he's asking how to dynamically have a property be equal to a dynamic result of other properties--i.e., why doesn't

x = {
  a: "hello",
  b: " ",
  c: "world",
  d: this.a + this.b + this.c
}

result in

x.d === "hello world"

?

Instead, what you find is that this refers to window there. This shows us that this is only something gotten from inside a function, and not an intrinsic relational reference we can rely on outside of that context.

This is clearly why the asker then used a function, to get access to this. However, I think the problem is then you get a function you have to call, where he actually wants text. (I might be extrapolating a bit there, not sure.)

One might be tempted to just use an IIFE, but that won't work either:

x = {
  a: "hello",
  b: " ",
  c: "world",
  d: (function() { this.a + this.b + this.c })()
}

x.d === NaN  // undefined + undefined + undefined

What happens is that when when we call an IIFE, we create a new scope, with a new this--also, it would only be run once, on object initialization, and wouldn't dynamically reflect those other value changes.

Because he said 'we have to assign the object to a variable and then use that', I assumed he had found a workaround wherein you just declare it twice, and on the second time it works if you're referring to properties on a global (so, x.a + x.b), and provided the wrong example.

All of this goes to show that lexical scoping overtakes dynamic scoping here. Another naive way one might consider trying to work around this would be like this:

x = {
  a: "hello",
  b: " ",
  c: "world",
  d: (function() { this.x.a + this.x.b + this.x.c })()
  // or maybe:
  e: (function() { this.x.a + this.x.b + this.x.c }).call(this)
}

(Explanation: since this refers to window and x is a global, and therefore property of window (i.e., window.x === x)... honestly we could also just omit this here, but it helps illustrate what's going on here so I'll leave it.)

But no, that function is called while x is being initialized, and so x isn't yet defined in lexical scope until after that function call. or e, 'this' is still window.

What we learn here is that there is no way to access sibling properties at evaluation time of the object within Javascript, either.

Neat!

As a result, to achieve the desired goal, two separate statements are needed:

x = {
  a: "hello",
  b: " ",
  c: "world"
}

x.d = x.a + x.b + x.c;

unless you desired the ability to have x.d dynamically respond with those values, instead of be the result of adding those values at this moment--then you'd just use the original code in the question, and have to evaluate it as a function.

... ...

As soon as I had finished writing the above, I remembered a javascript feature I've never used: getters and setters. Sure enough, they accomplish exactly what we're looking for here:

var hello = {
  a: "hello",
  b: "world",
  get test() {
    return this.a + this.b
  }
}
// undefined
hello.test
// "helloworld"
hello.a = 'stuff'
// "stuff"
hello.test
// "stuffworld"

Of course, this is computationally equivalent to calling hello.test() and just making test a function, as in the original code. This getter can't be serialized just like a function can't, as far as JSON goes (though we established that isn't the point here, I just want to be clear). In the end, the only thing we really gained was the ability to omit parenthesis--and this won't serialize over JSON, to be clear, if that really was really an intentional part of the question.

1
  • 2
    This should be accepted answer! Not only it displays how this can work in these circumstances but also teaches about little known js getters and setters. Kudos! Jan 24, 2020 at 15:18
4

There are multiple problems with the code. More basic than the problem with this is that JSON cannot even contain functions (remember that JSON is used by languages other than Javascript!). It is purely a system for data transfer.

Not all the objects that can be part of a Javascript object can be serialized in JSON.

4
  • I'm 99% sure that OP doesn't want to serialize the function, but rather is wanting to refer to the object being constructed via object literal syntax in order to create the fullName property without needing to do it after the creation.
    – Blue Skies
    Oct 29, 2013 at 13:20
  • @BlueSkies That's very plausible. Oct 29, 2013 at 13:23
  • JSON - JavaScript Object Notation. You are wrong in that JSON is not "purely a system for data transfer". It is a notation used in JavaScript to succinctly describe an object. { Feb 24 at 11:59
  • @LeslieMarshall That's incorrect. JSON is very similar to the JS object syntax (it's a strict subset, to be precise), but they are distinct. JSON is only for data serialisation, so for storage or transfer. Mar 3 at 10:43
4

"The code above neither work with the this keyword nor without it. Why is that?"

Though you talk about JSON, when reading the text of your question, it sounds like what you're asking is how to use this to refer to the object during its creation when using object literal syntax.

The reason this isn't working for you is that its value is defined only within a function, and what defines it is how the function was invoked.

Although your code does provide a function, it has no way to refer to the object during creation, because there's no reference available to it until after the literal syntax.


"The only working solution is to assign the JSON object to a variable and to use the variable in the code."

That's right, you can't use this in object literal syntax to refer to the new object, so you'd need to use a variable reference after.

Though as an alternative to the literal syntax, you can use a constructor function to create the object. That way you don't need to use the variable to create the fullName property after the object is already created.

var obj = new function() {
    this.firstName = "Foo";
    this.lastName = "Bar";
    this.fullName = this.firstName + " " + this.lastName;
};

This is also useful if you're passing the object to a function.

my_func(new function() {
    this.firstName = "Foo";
    this.lastName = "Bar";
    this.fullName = this.firstName + " " + this.lastName;
});

So the reason you can use this is that as I stated above, this is defined within a function, and is defined based on how the function was invoked.

Here we're using an anonymous function as a constructor by invoking it using new. That makes this refer to a new object being constructed, which is then returned from the constructor function automatically.

2
  • thank you very much for your comprehensive anwser. Unfortunately I've made a mistake posting the question without running the code in a debugger. The code in the post is valid (!) and works as expected, thus fullName() returns "Foo Bar" as expected. That code above has been simplified, because I thought the error is in the "this" keyword. That's not the case in the actual "knockout.js" code. Sorry for that... and thank you one more time for your anwser.
    – kalamar
    Oct 29, 2013 at 13:39
  • @kalamar: Yes, the function will work if you invoke it as obj.fullName(). I assumed you wanted to get the fullName without having to invoke a function.
    – Blue Skies
    Oct 29, 2013 at 13:41

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