24

I have some problems with ReaderWriterLockSlim. I cannot understand how it's magic working.

My code:

 private async Task LoadIndex()
    {
        if (!File.Exists(FileName + ".index.txt"))
        {
            return;
        }
        _indexLock.EnterWriteLock();// <1>
        _index.Clear();
        using (TextReader index = File.OpenText(FileName + ".index.txt"))
        {
            string s;
            while (null != (s = await index.ReadLineAsync()))
            {
                var ss = s.Split(':');
                _index.Add(ss[0], Convert.ToInt64(ss[1]));
            }
        }
        _indexLock.ExitWriteLock();<2>
    }

When I enter write lock at <1>, in debugger I can see that _indexLock.IsWriteLockHeld is true, but when execution steps to <2> I see _indexLock.IsWriteLockHeld is false and _indexLock.ExitWriteLock throws an exception SynchronizationLockException with message "The write lock is being released without being held". What I doing wrong?

  • How is _indexLock initialised? Could another thread be initialising it at the same time as a different thread is in LoadIndex()? – Matthew Watson Oct 29 '13 at 13:24
  • maybe another thread that has access to _indexLock is reinitializing it.... it couldn't be released by another thread for sure, but maybe reinitialized to a new instance all together... – Sadek Noureddine Oct 29 '13 at 13:27
  • It doesn't require a thread to get _indexLock to be overwritten. – Hans Passant Oct 29 '13 at 13:33
  • _indexLock is initialized when class istance created and declared like this: private readonly ReaderWriterLockSlim _indexLock = new ReaderWriterLockSlim(). There are no one thread can modify it. – l0nley Oct 29 '13 at 15:08
44

ReaderWriterLockSlim is a thread-affine lock type, so it usually cannot be used with async and await.

You should either use SemaphoreSlim with WaitAsync, or (if you really need a reader/writer lock), use my AsyncReaderWriterLock from AsyncEx or Stephen Toub's AsyncReaderWriterLock.

  • 1
    Wouldn't be also correct to say that it depends on the platform? The code posted by OP doesn't mention if it's WPF or a console app. In a console app it's not working because there's no SynchronizationContext there. The code works ok in a WPF app. stackoverflow.com/questions/15882710/… – Don Box May 17 '17 at 9:18
  • @DonBox: No; as I noted in my answer to that question, even if you resume on the same thread, you're still allowing arbitrary code to run while you're "holding" that lock. – Stephen Cleary May 17 '17 at 13:33
  • Oh man, and I thought I got it right. Can you explain what you mean by "arbitrary code"? You mean that code is not working properly not even in WPF? What's wrong with holding the lock there? In the answer, what did you mean by "usually" "it usually cannot be used"? Thanks! – Don Box May 17 '17 at 18:16
  • @DonBox: You've been asking a lot of questions in comments. I think you would benefit from asking your own question. – Stephen Cleary May 17 '17 at 21:07
  • OK, makes sense, here it is stackoverflow.com/questions/44036160/… – Don Box May 17 '17 at 23:11
3

You can safely emulate a reader/writer locking mechanism using the reliable and lightweight SemaphoreSlim and keep the benefits of async/await. Create the SemaphoreSlim giving it the number of available locks equivalent to the number of routines that will lock your resource for reading simultaneously. Each one will request one lock as usual. For your writing routine, make sure it requests all the available locks before doing its thing.

That way, your writing routine will always run alone while your reading routines might share the resource only between themselves.

For example, suppose you have 2 reading routines and 1 writing routine.

SemaphoreSlim semaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(2);

async void Reader1()
{
    await semaphore.WaitAsync();
    try
    {
        // ... reading stuff ...
    }
    finally
    {
        semaphore.Release();
    }
}

async void Reader2()
{
    await semaphore.WaitAsync();
    try
    {
        // ... reading other stuff ...
    }
    finally
    {
        semaphore.Release();
    }
}

async void ExclusiveWriter()
{
    // the exclusive writer must request all locks
    // to make sure the readers don't have any of them
    // (I wish we could specify the number of locks
    // instead of spamming multiple calls!)
    await semaphore.WaitAsync();
    await semaphore.WaitAsync();
    try
    {
        // ... writing stuff ...
    }
    finally
    {
        // release all locks here
        semaphore.Release(2);
        // (oh here we don't need multiple calls, how about that)
    }
}

Obviously this method only works if you know beforehand how many reading routines you could have running at the same time. Admittedly, too much of them would make this code very ugly.

  • 2
    This isn't providing read/write semantics. The idea of a reader/writer lock is that there can be any number of concurrent readers as you want, but when there is a write operation going on there cannot be any readers or other writers. This both unnecessarily limits readers, and doesn't properly limit readers or other writers when one operation is writing. – Servy Jun 29 '15 at 17:08
  • I does block any writers when you have active readers, and it still does allow concurrent readers when you don't have any active writers. That's essentially what a reader/writer lock should do, except when you don't know how many readers you'd have, as I clearly pointed out (even that could be got around if you really think about it, but I wouldn't spoil the surprise for you). It also might not be so elegant for your standards, but it is a valid solution and I myself used that in well-tested well-stressed high demand services. I'm all about going simple, but each to its own... – mycelo Jun 30 '15 at 11:13
  • This isn't bad for a quick solution that doesn't rely on external dependencies. Should probably be wrapped off into it's own class for reuse if needed (calling multiple .WaitAsync() for every read, plus remembering how many readers you accounted for on every use, and changing that across every use when necessary, would be ugly and bug-prone). – Marc L. Dec 15 '17 at 21:37
  • 5
    Looking at this a few months later: isn't there a possibility of deadlock if two threads call into ExclusiveWriter simultaneously? If both make it past the first WaitAsync() call, the call count will increase to two and both will be waiting for a Release(). – Marc L. Mar 9 '18 at 18:24

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