1

I have the following situation in which I want to multiply two arrays element wise, where one of the arrays has arrays as elements:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> base = np.array( [100., 111.,] )
>>> c = np.array( [9., 11.] )
>>> n0 = np.zeros(len(base))
>>> nn = 3 + n0     # This is the gist of a bunch of intermediate operations
>>> grid = [np.ones(i) for i in nn]
>>> base
array([ 100.,  111.])
>>> c
array([  9.,  11.])
>>> nn
array([ 3.,  3.])
>>> grid
[array([ 1.,  1.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  1.,  1.])]

So far everything looks good. grid seems to have two elements, three elements long each. I feel I should be able to multiply it with c

>>> a = grid * c
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: operands could not be broadcast together with shapes (2,3) (2) 

That does not go as I had hoped for. The error is promising. I can do some transposition tricks and get my result:

a = (grid.T * c).T Traceback (most recent call last): File "", line 1, in AttributeError: 'list' object has no attribute 'T'

That fails more espectacularly than I expected. I thought I was working with an array, but I learn that I now have a list. I try my hand at some good old fashioned brute force:

>>> grid_mod = np.array( [np.ones(3), np.ones(3) ] )
>>> grid_mod
array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.]])
>>> grid_mod * c
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
ValueError: operands could not be broadcast together with shapes (2,3) (2) 

I was sure that would work! I notice an extraneous space after my last element, so I remove it:

>>> grid_mod2 = np.array( [np.ones(3), np.ones(7)] )
>>> grid_mod2
array([array([ 1.,  1.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.])], dtype=object)
>>> grid_mod2 * c
array([array([ 9.,  9.,  9.]),
       array([ 11.,  11.,  11.,  11.,  11.,  11.,  11.])], dtype=object)

That last one works as expected.

My questions are:

  1. How can I define grid so that the result is an array of arrays instead of a list of arrays.
  2. What is actually going on in all of this? Why does the extra space at the end of the array give me a completely different result.
  3. Is there a more pythonic way of going about this?
2
  • try to use grid=np.vstack(grid) and use the 2-D array grid Oct 29, 2013 at 15:59
  • This still gives me a broadcasting error when I do the multiplication.
    – Ricardo
    Oct 29, 2013 at 17:28

1 Answer 1

2

These two pieces of code produce different things, although the space has no effect:

>>> np.array([np.ones(3), np.ones(3)])
array([[ 1.,  1.,  1.],
       [ 1.,  1.,  1.]])

Because both arrays in your list have the same dimension, this is converted into a single array of 2 rows and 3 columns.

>>> np.array([np.ones(3), np.ones(7)])
array([array([ 1.,  1.,  1.]), array([ 1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.,  1.])], dtype=object)

In this case, the lengths of the arrays do not match, so numpy creates a 1D array, two items long, of type object and each of those objects happens to be a numpy array.

When you multiply the first with c, you are trying to multiply an array of shape (2, 3) with an array of shape (2,), something numpy does not know how to do. You could get what you want if you reshaped your c array to have shape (2, 1), e.g.

>>> grid_mod * c[:, np.newaxis]
array([[  9.,   9.,   9.],
       [ 11.,  11.,  11.]])

When you multiply the second with c, you are trying to multiply two arrays of shape (2,), so numpy does elementwise multiplication with no problems. And since each of the items of your array is itself an array, when you try to multiply it by a scalar, numpy also know how to do it. While this does work, it is much, much slower than the previous approach, about 100x for 10000 row arrays:

c = np.random.rand(10000)
a = np.random.rand(10000, 3)
b = np.empty((10000,), dtype=object)
for j in xrange(10000):
    b[j] = a[j]

%timeit a*c[:, np.newaxis]
10000 loops, best of 3: 176 us per loop

%timeit b*c
10 loops, best of 3: 16.5 ms per loop
1
  • Thanks! This will hopefully do the trick for now. I read up a bit on newaxis and, while still fuzzy, it works for all cases I can think of right now. At this stage I am not looking at all into performance, but the performance difference between the two approaches is astounding. Thanks again!
    – Ricardo
    Oct 29, 2013 at 17:36

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