226

Haven't Python iterators got a has_next method?

1

18 Answers 18

343

There's an alternative to the StopIteration by using next(iterator, default_value).

For exapmle:

>>> a = iter('hi')
>>> print next(a, None)
h
>>> print next(a, None)
i
>>> print next(a, None)
None

So you can detect for None or other pre-specified value for end of the iterator if you don't want the exception way.

4
  • 92
    if you use None as the "sentinel", you best be sure your iterator doesn't have any Nones. you could also do sentinel = object() and next(iterator, sentinel) and test with is. Oct 3, 2013 at 18:00
  • 3
    following @samboosalis I would rather use built-in unittest.mock.sentinel object which allows you to write an explicit next(a, sentinel.END_OF_ITERATION) and then if next(...) == sentinel.END_OF_ITERATION Dec 1, 2018 at 19:40
  • this is prettier than the exception
    – Dee
    Oct 1, 2019 at 6:30
  • 8
    The problem is that, this way, you CONSUME the next value from the iterator as well. hasNext in Java doesn't consume the next value. Jul 17, 2020 at 12:18
149

No, there is no such method. The end of iteration is indicated by an exception. See the documentation.

11
  • 88
    "It's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission."
    – Roger Pate
    Dec 27, 2009 at 18:57
  • 167
    "It's easier to ask for forgiveness than permission.": Checking whether an iterator has a next element is not asking for permission. There are situations in which you want to test for the existence of a next element without consuming it. I would accept the try catch solution if there was an unnext() method to put the first element back after I have checked that it exists by calling next().
    – Giorgio
    Dec 24, 2012 at 20:26
  • 21
    @Giorgio, there is no way to know whether another element exists without executing the code that generates it (you don't know whether the generator will execute yield or not). It is, of course, not difficult to write an adaptor that stores the result of next() and provides has_next() and move_next().
    – avakar
    Dec 24, 2012 at 21:10
  • 7
    The same idea could be used to implement the hasNext() method (to produce, cache and return true on success, or return false on failure). Then both hasNext() and next() would depend on a common underlying getNext() method and cached item. I really do not see why next() shouldn't be in the standard library if it is so easy to implement an adaptor that provides it.
    – Giorgio
    Dec 24, 2012 at 21:21
  • 5
    @LarsH: You mean e.g. an iterator that reads from a file that can be changed while reading from it? I agree that this can be a problem (which affects any library providing next() and hasNext() method, not just a hypothetical Python library). So yes, next() and hasNext() becomes tricky if the content of the stream being scanned depends on when elements are read.
    – Giorgio
    Jan 25, 2013 at 6:42
46

If you really need a has-next functionality, it's easy to obtain it with a little wrapper class. For example:

class hn_wrapper(object):
  def __init__(self, it):
    self.it = iter(it)
    self._hasnext = None
  def __iter__(self): return self
  def next(self):
    if self._hasnext:
      result = self._thenext
    else:
      result = next(self.it)
    self._hasnext = None
    return result
  def hasnext(self):
    if self._hasnext is None:
      try: self._thenext = next(self.it)
      except StopIteration: self._hasnext = False
      else: self._hasnext = True
    return self._hasnext

now something like

x = hn_wrapper('ciao')
while x.hasnext(): print next(x)

emits

c
i
a
o

as required.

Note that the use of next(sel.it) as a built-in requires Python 2.6 or better; if you're using an older version of Python, use self.it.next() instead (and similarly for next(x) in the example usage). [[You might reasonably think this note is redundant, since Python 2.6 has been around for over a year now -- but more often than not when I use Python 2.6 features in a response, some commenter or other feels duty-bound to point out that they are 2.6 features, thus I'm trying to forestall such comments for once;-)]]

===

For Python3, you would make the following changes:

from collections.abc import Iterator  # since python 3.3 Iterator is here

class hn_wrapper(Iterator):  # need to subclass Iterator rather than object
  def __init__(self, it):
    self.it = iter(it)
    self._hasnext = None
    
  def __iter__(self): 
    return self
  
  def __next__(self):        # __next__ vs next in python 2
    if self._hasnext:
      result = self._thenext
    else:
      result = next(self.it)
    self._hasnext = None
    return result
  
  def hasnext(self):
    if self._hasnext is None:
      try: 
        self._thenext = next(self.it)
      except StopIteration: 
        self._hasnext = False
      else: self._hasnext = True
    return self._hasnext
4
  • 14
    "faithfully transcribing an algorithm from a reference implementation in Java" is the worst reason to need a has_next method. Python's design makes it impossible to, say, use filter to check if an array contains an element matching a given predicate. The arrogance and shortsightedness of the Python community is staggering. Aug 21, 2017 at 13:48
  • nice answer, I'm copying this for ilustration of some design pattern taken from Java code
    – madtyn
    Sep 13, 2017 at 22:12
  • 1
    I'm with Python3 and this code gives me TypeError: iter() returned non-iterator
    – madtyn
    Sep 14, 2017 at 13:35
  • 3
    @JonathanCast not sure I follow. In Python, you would typically use map and any instead of filter, but you could use SENTINEL = object(); next(filter(predicate, arr), SENTINEL) is not SENTINEL or forget a SENTINEL and just use try: except and catch the StopIteration. Sep 18, 2018 at 19:50
17

In addition to all the mentions of StopIteration, the Python "for" loop simply does what you want:

>>> it = iter("hello")
>>> for i in it:
...     print i
...
h
e
l
l
o
10

Try the __length_hint__() method from any iterator object:

iter(...).__length_hint__() > 0
4
  • 6
    I always wondered why on earth python has all those __ xxx __ methods ? They seem so ugly.
    – mP.
    Feb 1, 2010 at 11:45
  • 8
    Legitimate question! Usually it's the syntax for methods that are exposed by a builtin function (e.g. len, is actually calling len). Such a builtin function does not exists for length_hint, but it is actually a pending proposal (PEP424).
    – fulmicoton
    Feb 2, 2013 at 12:13
  • 1
    @mP. these functions are there, because they are sometimes needed. They are intentionally ugly, because they are deemed as method of last resort: If you use them, you know that you do something non-pythonic and potentially dangerous (which also might stop working at any point). Apr 15, 2016 at 13:54
  • 3
    Like __init__ and __main__ ? Imho, its a bit of a mess no matter you try to justify it.
    – user1363990
    Aug 22, 2017 at 1:50
7

You can tee the iterator using, itertools.tee, and check for StopIteration on the teed iterator.

5

hasNext somewhat translates to the StopIteration exception, e.g.:

>>> it = iter("hello")
>>> it.next()
'h'
>>> it.next()
'e'
>>> it.next()
'l'
>>> it.next()
'l'
>>> it.next()
'o'
>>> it.next()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
StopIteration
3

No. The most similar concept is most likely a StopIteration exception.

2
  • 13
    What Python uses exceptions for control flow ? Sounds pretty nafted.
    – mP.
    Feb 1, 2010 at 11:44
  • 5
    Right: exceptions should be used to handle errors, not to define the normal flow of control.
    – Giorgio
    Dec 24, 2012 at 20:23
2

I believe python just has next() and according to the doc, it throws an exception is there are no more elements.

http://docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#iterator-types

1

The use case that lead me to search for this is the following

def setfrom(self,f):
    """Set from iterable f"""
    fi = iter(f)
    for i in range(self.n):
        try:
            x = next(fi)
        except StopIteration:
            fi = iter(f)
            x = next(fi)
        self.a[i] = x 

where hasnext() is available, one could do

def setfrom(self,f):
    """Set from iterable f"""
    fi = iter(f)
    for i in range(self.n):
        if not hasnext(fi):
            fi = iter(f) # restart
        self.a[i] = next(fi)

which to me is cleaner. Obviously you can work around issues by defining utility classes, but what then happens is you have a proliferation of twenty-odd different almost-equivalent workarounds each with their quirks, and if you wish to reuse code that uses different workarounds, you have to either have multiple near-equivalent in your single application, or go around picking through and rewriting code to use the same approach. The 'do it once and do it well' maxim fails badly.

Furthermore, the iterator itself needs to have an internal 'hasnext' check to run to see if it needs to raise an exception. This internal check is then hidden so that it needs to be tested by trying to get an item, catching the exception and running the handler if thrown. This is unnecessary hiding IMO.

1
1

No, there is no such method. The end of iteration is indicated by a StopIteration (more on that here).


This follows the python principle EAFP (easier to ask for forgiveness than permission). A has_next method would follow the principle of LBYL (look before you leap) and contradicts this core python principle.

This interesting article explains the two concepts in more detail.

0

Suggested way is StopIteration. Please see Fibonacci example from tutorialspoint

#!usr/bin/python3

import sys
def fibonacci(n): #generator function
   a, b, counter = 0, 1, 0
   while True:
      if (counter > n): 
         return
      yield a
      a, b = b, a + b
      counter += 1
f = fibonacci(5) #f is iterator object

while True:
   try:
      print (next(f), end=" ")
   except StopIteration:
      sys.exit()
0

It is also possible to implement a helper generator that wraps any iterator and answers question if it has next value:

Try it online!

def has_next(it):
    first = True
    for e in it:
        if not first:
            yield True, prev
        else:
            first = False
        prev = e
    if not first:
        yield False, prev

for has_next_, e in has_next(range(4)):
    print(has_next_, e)

Which outputs:

True 0
True 1
True 2
False 3

The main and probably only drawback of this method is that it reads ahead one more element, for most of tasks it is totally alright, but for some tasks it may be disallowed, especially if user of has_next() is not aware of this read-ahead logic and may missuse it.

Code above works for infinite iterators too.

Actually for all cases that I ever programmed such kind of has_next() was totally enough and didn't cause any problems and in fact was very helpful. You just have to be aware of its read-ahead logic.

0

Maybe it's just me, but while I like https://stackoverflow.com/users/95810/alex-martelli 's answer, I find this a bit easier to read:

from collections.abc import Iterator  # since python 3.3 Iterator is here

class MyIterator(Iterator):  # need to subclass Iterator rather than object
  def __init__(self, it):
    self._iter = iter(it)
    self._sentinel = object()
    self._next = next(self._iter, self._sentinel)
    
  def __iter__(self): 
    return self
  
  def __next__(self):        # __next__ vs next in python 2
    if not self.has_next():
      next(self._iter)  # raises StopIteration

    val = self._next
    self._next = next(self._iter, self._sentinel)
    return val
  
  def has_next(self):
    return self._next is not self._sentinel
0

The way has solved it based on handling the "StopIteration" execption is pretty straightforward in order to read all iterations :

    end_cursor = False
    while not end_cursor:
        try:
            print(cursor.next())
        except StopIteration:
            print('end loop')
            end_cursor = True
        except:
            print('other exceptions to manage')
            end_cursor = True
0

I think there are valid use cases for when you may want some sort of has_next functionality, in which case you should decorate an iterator with a has_next defined.

Combining concepts from the answers to this question here is my implementation of that which feels like a nice concise solution to me (python 3.9):

_EMPTY_BUF = object()


class BufferedIterator(Iterator[_T]):
    def __init__(self, real_it: Iterator[_T]):
        self._real_it = real_it
        self._buf = next(self._real_it, _EMPTY_BUF)

    def has_next(self):
        return self._buf is not _EMPTY_BUF

    def __next__(self) -> _T_co:
        v = self._buf
        self._buf = next(self._real_it, _EMPTY_BUF)
        if v is _EMPTY_BUF:
            raise StopIteration()
        return v

The main difference is that has_next is just a boolean expression, and also handles iterators with None values.

Added this to a gist here with tests and example usage.

-1

very interesting question, but this "hasnext" design had been put into leetcode: https://leetcode.com/problems/iterator-for-combination/

here is my implementation:

class CombinationIterator:

def __init__(self, characters: str, combinationLength: int):
    from itertools import combinations
    from collections import deque
    self.iter = combinations(characters, combinationLength)
    self.res = deque()


def next(self) -> str:
    if len(self.res) == 0:
        return ''.join(next(self.iter))
    else:
        return ''.join(self.res.pop())


def hasNext(self) -> bool:
    try:
        self.res.insert(0, next(self.iter))
        return True
    except:
        return len(self.res) > 0
-2

The way I solved my problem is to keep the count of the number of objects iterated over, so far. I wanted to iterate over a set using calls to an instance method. Since I knew the length of the set, and the number of items counted so far, I effectively had an hasNext method.

A simple version of my code:

class Iterator:
    # s is a string, say
    def __init__(self, s):
        self.s = set(list(s))
        self.done = False
        self.iter = iter(s)
        self.charCount = 0

    def next(self):
        if self.done:
            return None
        self.char = next(self.iter)
        self.charCount += 1
        self.done = (self.charCount < len(self.s))
        return self.char

    def hasMore(self):
        return not self.done

Of course, the example is a toy one, but you get the idea. This won't work in cases where there is no way to get the length of the iterable, like a generator etc.

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