198

Say I have a fairly hefty JavaScript file, packed down to roughly 100kb or so. By file I mean it’s an external file that would be linked in via <script src="...">, not pasted into the HTML itself.

Where’s the best place to put this in the HTML?

<html>
<head>
    <!-- here? -->
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="stylez.css" type="text/css" />
    <!-- here? -->
</head>
<body>
    <!-- here? -->
    <p>All the page content ...</p>
    <!-- or here? -->
</body>
</html>

Will there be any functional difference between each of the options?

11 Answers 11

166

The Yahoo! Exceptional Performance team recommend placing scripts at the bottom of your page because of the way browsers download components.

Of course Levi's comment "just before you need it and no sooner" is really the correct answer, i.e. "it depends".

  • 4
    For example, if you're going to be doing a bunch of jQuery stuff, you would need the library loaded before you actually try to make use of it. – BryanH Jul 8 '09 at 22:09
  • 55
    Also, the reason why Yahoo EPT recommends placing JS at the bottom is because the browser must go into single-threaded mode while the JS loads and then executes. If the script is in the head or in the midst of the content, the browser will "pause" while it deals with the JS. By placing the JS at the bottom, the content will be loaded and generally visible so the user can start reading it while the browser is still dealing with the JS. – BryanH Jul 8 '09 at 22:12
  • 1
    Hi. Do we put code like this $(function () {...}) as the bottom of the page as well, or does it have to be inside <head> ? – Thang Pham May 6 '13 at 4:25
  • 7
    I hope referring of "bottom of your page" here is not beyond </body>? – Mr_Green Aug 8 '13 at 6:20
  • 1
    Modern browsers can also read the "defer" attribute. You can set defer="defer" on script tags that aren't at the bottom of the <body>, and when the browser sees those, it will first finish loading the rest of the html and then go back and interpret the contents of the script tag. This is helpful if you're using some sort of framework where you don't have full control of the page. Dig into this article and note that it's a living document so some of the info is outdated: stackoverflow.com/questions/5250412/… – LinuxDisciple Sep 22 '16 at 16:15
73

The best place for it is just before you need it and no sooner.

Also, depending on your users' physical location, using a service like Amazon's S3 service may help users download it from a server physically closer to them than your server.

Is your js script a commonly used lib like jQuery or prototype? If so, there are a number of companies, like Google and Yahoo, that have tools to provide these files for you on a distributed network.

55

As a rule of thumb, the best place to put <script> tags is the bottom of the page, just before </body> tag. Something like this:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>My awesome page</title>

        <!-- CSS -->
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="...">
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="...">
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="...">
        <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="...">

    </head>
    <body>
        <!-- Content content content -->

        <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.10.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="..."></script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="..."></script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="..."></script>
    </body>
</html>

Why?

The problem caused by scripts is that they block parallel downloads. The HTTP/1.1 specification suggests that browsers download no more than two components in parallel per hostname. If you serve your images from multiple hostnames, you can get more than two downloads to occur in parallel. While a script is downloading, however, the browser won't start any other downloads, even on different hostnames. More...

CSS

A little bit off-topic, but... Put stylesheets at the top.

While researching performance at Yahoo!, we discovered that moving stylesheets to the document HEAD makes pages appear to be loading faster. This is because putting stylesheets in the HEAD allows the page to render progressively. More...

Further reading

Yahoo have released a really cool guide that lists best practices to speed up a website. Definitely worth reading: https://developer.yahoo.com/performance/rules.html

3

With 100k of Javascript, you should never put it inside the file. Use an external script Javascript file. There's no chance in hell you'll only ever use this amount of code in only one HTML page. Likely you're asking where you should load the Javascript file, for this you've received satisfactory answers already.

But I'd like to point out that commonly, modern browsers accept gzipped Javascript files! Just gzip the x.js file to x.js.gz, and point to that in the src attribute. It doesn't work on the local filesystem, you need a webserver for it to work. But the savings in transferred bytes can be enormous.

I've successfully tested it in Firefox 3, MSIE 7, Opera 9, and Google Chrome. It apparently doesn't work this way in Safari 3.

For more info, see this blog post, and another very ancient page that nevertheless is useful because it points out that the webserver can detect whether a browser can accept gzipped Javascript, or not. If your server side can dynamically choose to send the gzipped or the plain text, you can make the page usable in all web browsers.

  • 8
    You've misunderstood the OP's question. He was asking where in the HTML to put the script tag. He was already using an external file, not inlining the script. Admittedly, this was less clear prior to his edit of the question in April '09. Perhaps delete this answer? – Mark Amery Jun 23 '13 at 12:18
  • 6
    really really wrong, I can't believe why it has 8 votes up – MacGyver Aug 22 '13 at 17:32
  • @Leandro I guess it's because people don't always keep the actual question in mind yet still consider answers such as this one useful. Nonetheless, this answer is useful but not necessarily relevant. It might work better if the vote up tooltip contains more explicit wording, e.g. 'This answer is useful and relevant'. – WynandB Nov 22 '13 at 1:21
  • 1
    On gzipped Javascript: You can just configure your webserver to compress it as well... (Or use something like nginx's gzip_static module/option) (and the gunzip one for other clients) That should at least send the correct content-type header, with encoding marked as gzip, likely resulting in even better browser support – Gert van den Berg Feb 5 '15 at 9:14
3

Using cuzillion you can test the affect on page load of different placement of script tags using different methods: inline, external, "HTML tags", "document.write", "JS DOM element", "iframe", and "XHR eval". See the help for an explanation of the differences. It can also test stylesheets, images and iframes.

3

Putting the javascript at the top would seem neater, but functionally, its better to go after the HTML. That way, your javascript won't run and try to reference HTML elements before they are loaded. This sort of problem often only becomes apparent when you load the page over an actual internet connection, especially a slow one.

You could also try to dynamically load the javascript by adding a header element from other javascript code, although that only makes sense if you aren't using all of the code all the time.

1

The answer is depends how you are using the objects of javascript. As already pointed loading the javascript files at footer rather than header certainly improves the performance but care should be taken that the objects which are used are initialized later than they are loaded at footer. One more way is load the 'js' files placed in folder which will be available to all the files.

0

Like others have said, it should most likely go in an external file. I prefer to include such files at the end of the <head />. This method is more human friendly than machine friendly, but that way I always know where the JS is. It is just not as readable to include script files anywhere else (imho).

I you really need to squeeze out every last ms then you probably should do what Yahoo says.

0

The scripts should be included at the end of the body tag because this way the HTML will be parsed by the browser and displayed before the scripts are loaded.

-1

Your javascript links can got either in the head or at the end of the body tag, it is true that performance improves by putting the link at the end of your body tag, but unless performance is an issue, placing them in the head is nicer for people to read and you know where the links are located and can reference them easier.

-1

I would say that it depends of fact what do you planed to achieve with Javascript code:

  • if you planned to insert external your JS script(s), then the best place is in head of the page
  • if you planed to use pages on smartphones, then bottom of page, just before tag.
  • but, if you planned to make combination HTML and JS (dynamically created and populated HTML table, for example) then you must put it where you need it there.
  • What I said to deserve minus!? Geez. – Ludus H Jul 26 '16 at 20:31
  • What does being external have to do with putting the script in the head? Why is the bottom of the page a good place to put scripts specifically for smart phones? Your statement about dynamically generating HTML from JS is true only if you are using document.write, which you probably shouldn't be. – Quentin Aug 1 '16 at 7:34
  • You "presumed" what I thought and due that my answer got minus? You think probably that your presumption is better than my explanation, right? I just planned to make short explanation, if someone is unable to understand then he'll ask for more info. In my comment I suggested to put JS into end of page for smarth phones and tablets, just before end of body because loading of whole page is faster as browser doesn't need to switch to "single thread" mode, page content will start appear on screen... but you probably know this. – Ludus H Aug 1 '16 at 17:38

protected by Alex Shesterov Jan 23 at 16:22

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