52

Editor's note: This code example is from a version of Rust prior to 1.0 and is not syntactically valid Rust 1.0 code. Updated versions of this code produce different errors, but the answers still contain valuable information.

I came across the following example of how to generate a random number using Rust, but it doesn't appear to work. The example doesn't show which version of Rust it applies to, so perhaps it is out-of-date, or perhaps I got something wrong.

// http://static.rust-lang.org/doc/master/std/rand/trait.Rng.html

use std::rand;
use std::rand::Rng;

fn main() {
    let mut rng = rand::task_rng();
    let n: uint = rng.gen_range(0u, 10);
    println!("{}", n);
    let m: float = rng.gen_range(-40.0, 1.3e5);
    println!("{}", m);
}

When I attempt to compile this, the following error results:

test_rand002.rs:6:17: 6:39 error: type `@mut std::rand::IsaacRng` does not
implement any method in scope named `gen_range`
test_rand002.rs:6    let n: uint = rng.gen_range(0u, 10);
                                   ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
test_rand002.rs:8:18: 8:46 error: type `@mut std::rand::IsaacRng` does not
implement any method in scope named `gen_range`
test_rand002.rs:8    let m: float = rng.gen_range(-40.0, 1.3e5);
                                    ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

There is another example (as follows) on the same page (above) that does work. However, it doesn't do exactly what I want, although I could adapt it.

use std::rand;
use std::rand::Rng;

fn main() {
    let mut rng = rand::task_rng();
    let x: uint = rng.gen();
    println!("{}", x);
    println!("{:?}", rng.gen::<(f64, bool)>());
}

How can I generate a "simple" random number using Rust (e.g.: i64) within a given range (e.g.: 0 to n)?

1

4 Answers 4

71

This generates a random number between 0 (inclusive) and 100 (exclusive) using Rng::gen_range:

use rand::Rng; // 0.8.0

fn main() {
    // Generate random number in the range [0, 99]
    let num = rand::thread_rng().gen_range(0..100);
    println!("{}", num);
}

Don't forget to add the rand dependency to Cargo.toml:

[dependencies]
rand = "0.8"
2
  • 3
    this won't even compile there's no method gen_rng rand::prelude::ThreadRng the compiler says
    – nikoss
    Jan 22, 2019 at 17:43
  • 4
    @nikoss you need to install the rand crate. And as I said add it to cargo.toml Jan 24, 2019 at 20:20
24

Editor's note: This answer is for a version of Rust prior to 1.0 and is not valid in Rust 1.0. See Manoel Stilpen's answer instead.

This has been changing a lot recently (sorry! it's all been me), and in Rust 0.8 it was called gen_integer_range (note the /0.8/ rather than /master/ in the URL, if you are using 0.8 you need to be reading those docs).

A word of warning: .gen_integer_range was entirely incorrect in many ways, the new .gen_range doesn't have incorrectness problems.


Code for master (where .gen_range works fine):

use std::rand::{task_rng, Rng};

fn main() {
    // a number from [-40.0, 13000.0)
    let num: f64 = task_rng().gen_range(-40.0, 1.3e4);
    println!("{}", num);
}
3
  • I see that for 0.10 and master the documentation says to use rand::Rng static.rust-lang.org/doc/0.10/rand/index.html so it's a documentation bug probably
    – rofrol
    May 7, 2014 at 16:33
  • 4
    I get rust.rs:1:17: 1:25 error: unresolved import std::rand::task_rng. There is no task_rng` in std::rand rust.rs:1 use std::rand::{task_rng, Rng}; ^~~~~~~~ error: aborting due to previous error ` when I try to compile it with rustc 1.0.0-nightly (b4c965ee8 2015-03-02) (built 2015-03-03) Mar 3, 2015 at 13:42
  • 11
    For people who stumble upon this question now: rand seems to have become an independent crate on its own, and the answer by Manoel Stilpen below, where you explicitly use that crate, works.
    – xji
    Feb 18, 2017 at 13:24
10

The documentation for Rng::gen_range states:

This function is optimised for the case that only a single sample is made from the given range. See also the Uniform distribution type which may be faster if sampling from the same range repeatedly.

Uniform can be used to generate a single value:

use rand::distributions::{Distribution, Uniform}; // 0.6.5

fn main() {
    let step = Uniform::new(0, 50);
    let mut rng = rand::thread_rng();
    let choice = step.sample(&mut rng);
    println!("{}", choice);
}

Playground

Or to generate an iterator of values:

use rand::distributions::{Distribution, Uniform}; // 0.6.5

fn main() {
    let step = Uniform::new(0, 50);
    let mut rng = rand::thread_rng();
    let choices: Vec<_> = step.sample_iter(&mut rng).take(10).collect();
    println!("{:?}", choices);
}

Playground

4
  • In Rust 1.15.1, I'm getting "unresolved name" from rand::thread_rng. play.rust-lang.org/…
    – sudo
    Feb 20, 2017 at 18:27
  • 1
    I think something changed since every answer and even the documentation uses rand::thread_rng. By the way, rand is unstable now, so you have to add #![feature(rand)] to the top of your file and use the nightly rustc. All I want to do is test something; I'm this close to just using the C rand() function through FFI and calling it a day.
    – sudo
    Feb 20, 2017 at 18:34
  • This works for me with Rust 1.7.0. Have to add rand = "0.3" into Cargo.toml file though.
    – frabcus
    Apr 3, 2017 at 12:32
  • 1
    As of rustc 1.42.0 (stable) with > rand 0.7 this appears to be the most accurate answer.
    – jaredwolff
    Mar 27, 2020 at 21:52
-1

And why don't you just use a modulo?

let x = rng.gen<u32>() % 25

so your values will be between 0 and 24. Add an offset if you need a different range.

1
  • This will give you numbers in range 0..25, but their distribution will not be uniform. It may be negligible with 25, since it is lot smaller than u32::MAX. But if you used this with range 0..4_000_000_000, you would find that you get the numbers in 0..294_649_297 twice as often as those in 294_649_297..4_000_000_000.
    – michalsrb
    Apr 19 at 8:55

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