5

Why does the following exception thrown from the constructor of class A get caught twice, first by the catch within the constructor itself and second time by the catch in the main function?

Why doesn't it get caught just once by the catch within the constructor?

 #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;

    class E {
       public:
          const char* error;
          E(const char* arg) : error(arg) { }
    };

    class A {
       public:
          int i;

          A() try : i(0) {
             throw E("Exception thrown in A()");
          }
          catch (E& e) {
             cout << e.error << endl;
          }
    };

    int main() {

       try {
          A x;
       }
       catch(...) 
       {
        cout << "Exception caught" << endl; 
       }
    }

If I remove the try-catch block in the main function, the program will crash. Here is the output:

Exception thrown in A()
terminate called after throwing an instance of 'E'
zsh: abort (core dumped)  ./main

Why does it crash without the try-catch block in the main function?

  • 2
    Also if you put the try inside the constructor's body, you will catch one exception. – deepmax Oct 30 '13 at 15:38
  • @MM. yes, why is that? And it doesn't crash anymore without the try-catch block in main. – cpp_noname Oct 30 '13 at 15:41
  • Please don't catch the ellipsis ... do it right and catch the appropriate exceptions. – thokra Oct 30 '13 at 15:41
  • You should better catch exceptions using const references. – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 30 '13 at 15:43
  • 1
    Because you usually don't want to change them after throwing/catching, if you need to create a new copy and rethrow this one. – πάντα ῥεῖ Oct 30 '13 at 15:53
2

It seems logical. Consider two following scenarios.

i. Try block is inside constructor's body:

  A() : i(0) {
    try
    {
       throw E("Exception thrown in A()");
    }
    catch (E& e) {
       cout << e.error << endl;
    }
    // If code reaches here,
    // it means the construction finished well
  }

ii. Try block is in initializer ctor:

  A() try : i(0) {
     throw E("Exception thrown in A()");
  }
  catch (E& e) {
     cout << e.error << endl;

     // OK, you handled the exception,
     // but wait you didn't construct the object!
  }

In the first case, after an exception, you will handle it inside the constructor and then you will construct the object properly.

In the second case, after an exception you will handle it there. BUT you didn't construct the object yet and you have no object in the caller's side. The caller should handle an un-constructed object situation.

  • @M M, Is the second exception that gets caught by the caller a different exception from the first one that the constructor threw? According to your explanation, the second one should be an exception due to the incomplete construction of the object, correct? – cpp_noname Oct 30 '13 at 16:04
  • @takwing: No they are the same. Yes. In fact, the second scenario will re-throw the exception. – deepmax Oct 30 '13 at 16:18
3

Function-try-blocks in a constructor cannot prevent exceptions. Once an exception occurs in a constructor, you have no object, and the exception must propagate. The only thing the function-try-block can do is some local clean-up.

Constructors are indeed a very special animal with regards to function-try-blocks.

Cf. C++11 15.3/14:

The currently handled exception is rethrown if control reaches the end of a handler of the function-try-block of a constructor or destructor.


Tl;dr: Do not use function-try-blocks, ever.

  • so does it mean that it catches but then fails although the catch block has been executed? – cpp_noname Oct 30 '13 at 15:52
  • But why does it get caught once with try-catch inside the constructor? What is the difference between function-try-blocks and try-catch blocks within a function? – cpp_noname Oct 30 '13 at 15:54
  • @takwing: yes. an exception thrown during initilization means the object could not be constructed properly and thus is not supposed to exist. if you catch the exception outside, you can handle the fact that object construction failed. If you catch an exception inside the body of the constructor, it will not be an exception that stems from initialization but from some statement that was executed after successful construction has already taken place. – thokra Oct 30 '13 at 15:55
  • @takwing: The scope is different. An ordinary try/catch block is inside the function body scope. A function-try-block surrounds the function body scope. – Kerrek SB Oct 30 '13 at 15:59
  • @KerrekSB: Incidentally, what, if any, is an actual use-case of funtion-try-block? – thokra Oct 30 '13 at 16:05
2

You are utilizing a feature called function-try-catch. When used in a constructor, it allows catching exceptions in the initialization list (especially useful for catching exceptions in base class constructors) as well as the constructor body. But since the exception is thrown in a constructor, the class is incomplete, so the compiler automatically rethrows any caught exception. that is why you see it caught twice.

Read the following article for more details:

Constructors and Exception in C++

  • Thanks for the answer and the article !!! – cpp_noname Oct 30 '13 at 16:08

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