48

I need a function that will pause the execution of the script until a key is pressed. I've tried:

var stdin = process.openStdin(); 
require('tty').setRawMode(true);    

stdin.on('keypress', function (chunk, key) {
  process.stdout.write('Get Chunk: ' + chunk + '\n');
  if (key && key.ctrl && key.name == 'c') process.exit();
});

but it's just listening for a keypress and nothing happens. The program does not continue executing.

How can I pause execution?

1
  • 2
    You can't pause the execution of script running in background. But I don't think that is the point, you need to pause the process.stdin/stdout. You can look into readline package.
    – user568109
    Oct 30, 2013 at 17:32

14 Answers 14

56

In node.js 7.6 and later you can do this:

const keypress = async () => {
  process.stdin.setRawMode(true)
  return new Promise(resolve => process.stdin.once('data', () => {
    process.stdin.setRawMode(false)
    resolve()
  }))
}

;(async () => {

  console.log('program started, press any key to continue')
  await keypress()
  console.log('program still running, press any key to continue')
  await keypress()
  console.log('bye')

})().then(process.exit)

Or if you want CTRL-C to exit the program but any other key to continue normal execution, then you can replace the "keypress" function above with this function instead:

const keypress = async () => {
  process.stdin.setRawMode(true)
  return new Promise(resolve => process.stdin.once('data', data => {
    const byteArray = [...data]
    if (byteArray.length > 0 && byteArray[0] === 3) {
      console.log('^C')
      process.exit(1)
    }
    process.stdin.setRawMode(false)
    resolve()
  }))
}
2
  • 2
    If using the latest TypeScript version, select ES6 for tsconfig,json and change then(process.exit) to then(()=>process.exit(0)). Jul 30, 2018 at 19:41
  • 2
    For some reason the program was exiting at the process.stdin.once call. Adding the process.stdin.resume() after setRawMode(true), as suggested on @vkurchatkin answer, solved it. (Node 14.16.0)
    – Hugo Aboud
    Jan 3, 2022 at 6:14
30

Works for me:

console.log('Press any key to exit');

process.stdin.setRawMode(true);
process.stdin.resume();
process.stdin.on('data', process.exit.bind(process, 0));
4
  • 32
    This is not a solution to the question, this kills the program on a keypress, the question was to pause and then resume on a keypress. Jun 11, 2014 at 22:36
  • 4
    I got in process.stdin.setRawMode(true) TypeError: Object #<Socket> has no method 'setRawMode'
    – hellboy
    Jun 29, 2015 at 8:37
  • You have to put process.stdin.setRawMode=true instead of function Aug 30, 2017 at 12:45
  • 3
    Watch out if you're using nodemon!! process.stdin.setRawMode may be undefined.
    – n370
    Nov 18, 2019 at 0:33
16

The accepted solution waits asynchronously for a key event and then exits, it is not really a solution to "Press any key to continue".

I needed to pause while writing some nodejs shell scripts. I ended up using the spawnSync of the child_process with the shell command "read".

This will basically pause the script and when you press Enter it will continue. Much like the pause command in windows.

require('child_process').spawnSync("read _ ", {shell: true, stdio: [0, 1, 2]});

Hope this helps.

2
  • 3
    For Windows replace "read _ " with "pause". I check process.platform to set it based on the platform.
    – orad
    Oct 27, 2019 at 22:33
  • simple and elegant
    – teleme.io
    Mar 18, 2022 at 13:23
13

This snippet does the job if you don't want to exit the process:

console.log('Press any key to continue.');
process.stdin.once('data', function () {
  continueDoingStuff();
});

It's async so won't work inside loop as-is-- if you're using Node 7 you could wrap it in a promise and use async/await.

1
  • Great no-nonsense stuff. You saved my afternoon. May 23, 2023 at 13:05
6

There is a package for this: press-any-key

And here is an example:

const pressAnyKey = require('press-any-key');
pressAnyKey("Press any key to resolve, or CTRL+C to reject", {
  ctrlC: "reject"
})
  .then(() => {
    console.log('You pressed any key')
  })
  .catch(() => {
    console.log('You pressed CTRL+C')
  })

It runs without problems in W10.

4
const fs = require('fs');
process.stdin.setRawMode(true);
fs.readSync(0, Buffer.alloc(1), 0, 1);

60% of the time, it works every time.

0
2
var fs = require("fs")
var fd = fs.openSync("/dev/stdin", "rs")
fs.readSync(fd, new Buffer(1), 0, 1)
fs.closeSync(fd)

This answer is taken from vadzim from node.js: readSync from stdin?

1
  • 1
    This is UNIX-only
    – Ruslan
    May 6, 2020 at 21:13
2

Late to the party, but here's my hacky solution. Basically goDoWork doesn't get run until the promise resolves, which only happens when you press enter.

let resolv = null;
const promise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    resolv = resolve;
})

var stdin = process.openStdin();
console.log('Press enter to continue');
stdin.on('data', () => {
    resolv();
    console.log("Key pressed");
});

promise.then(goDoWork);
1

I did not see an encompassing answer yet. In particular, the answers using process.stdin.destroy() preclude the functions being called twice if you need multiple key presses. The ones that do not call process.stdin.off(...) keep processing key presses. The ones that do not call process.stdin.pause() keep the process alive even after the program completes.

I believe the following function is pretty thorough. Called without parameters, it displays a "Press any key to continue..." message and waits for the user to press any key. The message parameter overrides the default message. The keys parameter allows you to listen for particular keys, and the message will repeat if other keys are pressed. The accepted key pressed is not case-sensitive unless the keys parameter is mixed-case.

The return value is a Promise with the key the user pressed (case adjusted for non-case-sensitive keys). The promise is rejected if they press CTRL-c.

function keyPress(message, keys) {
  const _message = message || "Press any key to continue...";
  const _keys = keys || "";
  return new Promise(function (resolve, reject) {
    const caseSensitive = _keys.toLowerCase() !== _keys && _keys.toUpperCase() !== _keys;
    process.stdout.write(_message);
    function keyListener(buffer) {
      let key = buffer.toString();
      if (key.charCodeAt(0) === 3) {
        process.stdin.setRawMode(false);
        process.stdin.off('data', keyListener);
        process.stdin.pause();
        // process.exit(0); // Exit process if you prefer.
        reject(key.charCodeAt(0));
      }
      const index = caseSensitive ? _keys.indexOf(key) : _keys.toLowerCase().indexOf(key.toLowerCase());
      if (_keys && index < 0) {
        process.stdout.write(key);
        process.stdout.write("\n");
        process.stdout.write(_message);
        return;
      }
      process.stdin.setRawMode(false);
      process.stdin.off('data', keyListener);
      process.stdin.pause();
      if (index >= 0) {
        key = _keys.charAt(index);
        process.stdout.write(key);
      }
      process.stdout.write("\n");
      resolve(key);
    }
    process.stdin.resume();
    process.stdin.setRawMode(true);
    process.stdin.on('data', keyListener);
  });
}

Example 1: Shows Press any key to continue... message, waits for any key press.

await keyPress();

Example 2: Shows Process data? (Y|N): message, waiting for the user to press y, n, Y, or N. Repeats the message if other key is pressed. answer will be either 'y' or 'n', regardless of case pressed.

const answer = await keyPress("Process data? (Y|N): ", "yn");
0
const readline = require('readline');
readline.emitKeypressEvents(process.stdin);
process.stdin.setRawMode(true);
process.stdin.on('keypress', (str, key) => {
  if (key.ctrl && key.name === 'c') {
    process.exit();
  } else {
    console.log(`You pressed the "${str}" key`);
    console.log();
    console.log(key);
    console.log();
  }
});
console.log('Press any key...');

reference

0

I solved it, in my case, by turning the setRawMode to false, like this:

setRawMode(value) {
    if (process.stdin.isTTY) {
        process.stdin.setRawMode(value);
    }
}

confirm(settings) {
    logUtils.log(logService.createConfirmSettingsTemplate(settings));
    readline.emitKeypressEvents(process.stdin);
    this.setRawMode(true);
    return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
        try {
            process.stdin.on('keypress', (chunk, key) => {
                if (chunk) { }
                resolve(key && key.name === 'y');
                this.setRawMode(false);
            });
        }
        catch (error) {
            this.setRawMode(false);
            reject(false);
        }
    }).catch(this.setRawMode(false));
}
0

If someone just looking for Press any key to EXIT!

console.log('Press any key to EXIT!');
process.openStdin().on('data',()=>{process.exit('0')});
-1

Press any key to continue

function pressAnyKey(msg = 'Press any key to continue') {
    return new Promise((resolve) => {
        console.log(msg || 'Press any key to continue');
        process.stdin.setRawMode(true);
        process.stdin.resume();
        process.stdin.on('data', () => {
            process.stdin.destroy();
            resolve();
        });
    });
}

(async () => {
    await pressAnyKey();
    console.log('hello');
})();

// timeout version

function pressAnyKey(msg = 'Press any key to continue', timeout = 3000) {
    return new Promise((resolve) => {
        let handler = null;
        const end = () => {
            process.stdin.destroy();
            if (handler) clearTimeout(handler);
            resolve();
        }
        console.log(msg || 'Press any key to continue');
        process.stdin.setRawMode(true);
        process.stdin.resume();
        process.stdin.on('data', end);
        handler = setTimeout(end, Math.max(1, timeout));
    });
}

Thanks @vkurchatkin

-3

I actually made an npm package called paktc that will help you with this. If you install the package:

> npm install paktc

Then you would use it like this:

// your console application code here...

require('paktc') // Press any key to continue...
4
  • 1
    Paktc does not work at all, it depends on a global called v8debug which don't care to research, but it's not in a normal node environment. Jan 30, 2016 at 20:14
  • It's only there when a debugger is actually attached. Just tried it again in node 5, still works. Feb 1, 2016 at 16:17
  • Meaning if you run node --debug it will only open the debugger port but will not necessarily debug unless you attach something to it. If you do, instead node --debug-brk then it will actually break when the process launches and attach a console debugger to it. At that point the global v8debug variable is found. Feb 2, 2016 at 14:11
  • Lol, no. You'd have to clear the require cache and then require it again obviously. But seriously this was my first npm library and it's terrible, lol. But I learned a lot. Sep 22, 2019 at 19:32

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