-1

I am not getting the string output from the following:

struct stringItem {
    int len;
    char str[1];
}

void allocationStringBuffer (char* stringContent, struct stringItem *string) {

    // dynamically sized object
    int n;
    n = strlen(stringContent);

    //struct stringItem *string = malloc(sizeof(struct stringItem) + n);
    string = malloc(sizeof(struct stringItem) + n);

    if (string == NULL) {             // check if malloc is successful
       printf("Memory allocation for string fails.\n");
       // exit(-1);
    }   

   strcpy(string->str, stringContent);
   printf("Struct string: %s\n", string->str);
   string->len = n;     
}

in main:

struct stringItem *string2;

allocationStringBuffer ("helloWorld", string2);

printf("Struct string: %s\n", (*string2).str);
free(string2);

allocationStringBuffer ("another Statement...", string2);
printf("Struct string: %s\n", string2->str);
free(string2);

The result is:

Struct string: helloWorld
Struct string:  ÉÉÉÉÉï Uï∞â∞¶SVWh♦☺
Struct string: another Statement...
Struct string:  ÉÉÉÉÉï Uï∞â∞¶SVWh♦☺

Thank you for your help.

[Updates with Thanks to ALL]
Here is the full working code. It has been resolved. Thank you to ALL.

struct stringItem {
    int len;
    char str[1];
};


void allocationStringBuffer (char* stringContent, struct stringItem** pstring) {

    // dynamically sized object
    int n;
    n = strlen(stringContent);

    struct stringItem *string;
    string = malloc(sizeof(struct stringItem) + (n+1));

    if (string == NULL) {             // check if malloc is successful
       printf("Memory allocation for string fails.\n");
       // exit(-1);
    }   

   strcpy(string->str, stringContent);
   printf("Struct string: %s\n", string->str);
   string->len = n;     

   *pstring = string;  // Copy allocated pointer to out-parameter.
}


in main

struct stringItem *string2; allocationStringBuffer ("helloWorld", &string2); printf("Struct string: %s\n", (*string2).str); free(string2); allocationStringBuffer ("another Statement...", &string2); printf("Struct string: %s\n", string2->str); free(string2);
3

It looks to me like you need to make these changes:

allocationStringBuffer ("helloWorld", &string2);  // Pass ADDRESS of string2, not just string2

void allocationStringBuffer (char* stringContent, struct stringItem **pstring)
{
    // dynamically sized object
    int n;
    n = strlen(stringContent);

    struct stringItem* string;  // Local variable, will be later copied to function parameter.
    string = malloc(sizeof(struct stringItem) + n);

    if (string == NULL) {             // check if malloc is successful
       printf("Memory allocation for string fails.\n");
       // exit(-1);
    }   

   strcpy(string->str, stringContent);
   printf("Struct string: %s\n", string->str);
   string->len = n;     

   *pstring = string;  // Copy allocated pointer to out-parameter.
}
  • 1
    This works. Thank you. – Ursa Major Oct 30 '13 at 17:31
0

You are missing the terminating null character in your malloc call.

string = malloc(sizeof(struct stringItem) + (n + 1));

strlen gives you the size without including the terminating null character.

Regards,

  • Nope... if that were it, we'd expect the string to print properly, then see garbage after the end of it. That is not the described output. – abelenky Oct 30 '13 at 16:03
  • You are right, this was not the main problem but it is a problem too. – Pedro Gandola Oct 30 '13 at 16:21
  • It entirely depends on how struct stringItem is defined (too bad poster has not shown us the structure definition!) If it is struct stringItem { int len; char str[1]; }, then the +1 is not needed. It is already built into the struct. (PS This is a very common structure definition in pre-C89 code, when dealing with network protocols) – abelenky Oct 30 '13 at 16:23
  • Now that the poster has posted the definition, we see it did have char str[1]; built into the definition. So sizeof(struct stringItem) already has space for the terminating null, and we only have to add the strlen of the source-string. – abelenky Oct 30 '13 at 18:01
  • 1
    Yes, in this case we don't need to reserve the space for the terminating null char on the malloc. – Pedro Gandola Oct 31 '13 at 0:35
0

You're passing a pointer to stringItem to the function, then overwriting the parameter with the return from malloc, then dropping it thus leaking its memory. You have two options to solve this:

void allocationStringBuffer(char* stringContent, struct stringItem** string) {
    int length = strlen(stringContent);
    *string = malloc(sizeof(struct stringItem) + length + 1);
    /* The +1 is padding.  You do want that. */
    strcpy(*string->str, stringContent);
}

or:

struct stringItem* allocationStringBuffer(char* stringContent) {
    int length = strlen(stringContent);
    struct stringItem* string = malloc(sizeof(struct stringItem) + length + 1);
    strcpy(string->str, stringContent);
    return string;
}

Basically, you have to return the pointer you're mallocing some way or another. You can't send it a pointer to a stringItem on the stack (i.e. a local variable) like you're doing.

  • I like your idea of returning the allocated pointer better than the answer i gave, of passing a pointer-to-a-pointer. Good choice! – abelenky Oct 30 '13 at 16:09
  • 1
    Did you run this code? – Ursa Major Oct 30 '13 at 17:25
  • @UrsaMajor nope! I don't have the requisite definition of struct stringItem, so it isn't going to compile. Regardless, not returning the pointer is going to be a problem, no? – sqykly Oct 31 '13 at 3:52
0

This one seems not right:

string = malloc(sizeof(struct stringItem) + n);

What are you trying to do here? string is an element of struct stringItem. So I think you just need to allocate string = malloc(sizeof(struct stringItem));

p/s: i should be good if you post your declaration of struct stringItem as well

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