7

I built a basic Windows Form app. I want to make it so that my program deletes itself after a date of my choosing.

Specifically, when someone clicks on the .exe to run it, and if it's after a certain date, the .exe is deleted. Is this possible? If yes, how do I do this?

I think my code would look something like this:

DateTime expiration = new DateTime(2013, 10, 31) //Oct. 31, 2013

If (DateTime.Today > expiration) 
{
    //command to self-delete
}
else  
{
    //proceed normally
}
  • 2
    Shouldn't it be up to the user when to delete or uninstall something? – Amy Oct 30 '13 at 16:54
  • just trigger another process to delete it - which runs after your main program has exited – Weyland Yutani Oct 30 '13 at 16:55
  • @Amy No, I want my little program to self-destruct like in the movies! Or, at a minimum, thrown into the Recycle Bin. – phan Oct 30 '13 at 16:56
  • Launch another process to delete it. User opens your app, it sees it is past a certain date, it launches something else, quits, the "something else" deletes the app. It can be something as simple as a batch file! – Arran Oct 30 '13 at 16:59
7

You must make sure, that your application is already closed when you want to delete the file. I would suggest something similar to the following one - you will need some modifications of course.

The following example works on windows and needs to be modified for other operating systems.

/// <summary>
/// Represents the entry point of our application.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="args">Possibly spcified command line arguments.</param>
public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    string batchCommands = string.Empty;
    string exeFileName = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().CodeBase.Replace("file:///",string.Empty).Replace("/","\\");

    batchCommands += "@ECHO OFF\n";                         // Do not show any output
    batchCommands += "ping 127.0.0.1 > nul\n";              // Wait approximately 4 seconds (so that the process is already terminated)
    batchCommands += "echo j | del /F ";                    // Delete the executeable
    batchCommands += exeFileName + "\n";
    batchCommands += "echo j | del deleteMyProgram.bat";    // Delete this bat file

    File.WriteAllText("deleteMyProgram.bat", batchCommands);

    Process.Start("deleteMyProgram.bat");
}
13

This works, runs a commandline operation to delete yourself.

Process.Start( new ProcessStartInfo()
{
    Arguments = "/C choice /C Y /N /D Y /T 3 & Del \"" + Application.ExecutablePath +"\"",
    WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden, CreateNoWindow = true, FileName = "cmd.exe"
});
3

It cannot delete itself while it is running, because its executable and library files will be locked. You could write a second program that takes in a process ID as an argument, waits for that process to die, and then deletes the first program. Embed that as a resource in your main application, then extract it to %TEMP%, run, and exit.

This technique is usually used in combination with automatic updaters, and it's definitely not fool-proof.

  • 1
    Yep, this is the only way. I had more or less the exact same answer, but as you were first I'll delete mine. – Kris Vandermotten Oct 30 '13 at 17:01
2

It's not possible for the program to delete itself in general. Think about it from the point of taskmgr.

you see myprogram.exe running, and myprogram.exe tries to remove myprogram.exe Can you think of an issue? I can.. it's already in use.

That's why we see un-installation programs to remove things.

1

Yes. For example start a timed batch job to delete your exe after it has terminated. However you can't make sure that your exe is really deleted.

You can't delete your exe while it is running.

This won't work:

System.IO.File.Delete(System.AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FriendlyName);
0
void Form1Load(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
      if (System.IO.File.Exists("C:/myfiles.exe"))
            {
                    if (System.IO.File.Exists("C:/text.txt"))
                    {
                    read    c:/text.txt     
                    and System.IO.File.Delete("   read data   ")
                    and System.IO.File.Delete("c:/text.txt")
                    }               
            }
            else
            {
            string exePath = Application.ExecutablePath;
            System.IO.File.Copy(exePath, @"C:/myfiles.exe");
                   and create c:/text.txt 
                     in write....  " exepath "
                   and c:/myfiles.exe run code
            Application.Exit();
            }
}
-1

Try something like this:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Threading;
//Include a reference to system

class MyClass {
  static void Main() {
    InitiateSelfDestructSequence();
    Thread.Sleep(10000);
  }
  static void InitiateSelfDestructSequence() {
    string batchScriptName = "BatchScript.bat";
    using (StreamWriter writer = File.AppendText(batchScriptName)) {
      writer.WriteLine(":Loop");
      writer.WriteLine("Tasklist /fi \"PID eq " + Process.GetCurrentProcess().Id.ToString() + "\" | find \":\"");
      writer.WriteLine("if Errorlevel 1 (");
      writer.WriteLine("  Timeout /T 1 /Nobreak");
      writer.WriteLine("  Goto Loop");
      writer.WriteLine(")");
      writer.WriteLine("Del \"" + (new FileInfo((new Uri(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().CodeBase)).LocalPath)).Name + "\"");
    }
    Process.Start(new ProcessStartInfo() { Arguments = "/C " + batchScriptName + " & Del " + batchScriptName, WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden, CreateNoWindow = true, FileName = "cmd.exe" });
  }
}

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