67

I have a Boolean and would like to avoid this pattern:

if (myBool) 
  Option(someResult) 
else 
  None

What I'd like to do is

myBool.toOption(someResult)

Any suggestions with a code example would be much appreciated.

10 Answers 10

34

Starting Scala 2.13, Option has a when builder for this exact purpose:

Option.when(condition)(result)

For instance:

Option.when(true)(3)
// Option[Int] = Some(3)
Option.when(false)(3)
// Option[Int] = None

Also note Option.unless which promotes the opposite condition.

60

Scalaz has a way to do it with BooleanOps.option. That would allow you to write :

myBool.option(someResult)

If you don't want to add a Scalaz dependency, just add the following in your code :

implicit class RichBoolean(val b: Boolean) extends AnyVal {
  final def option[A](a: => A): Option[A] = if (b) Some(a) else None
}
3
  • 18
    Because in Scala the imports are often as difficult to discover as the solution: import scalaz.syntax.std.boolean._ – cfeduke Oct 5 '15 at 15:18
  • Thanks @cfeduke - for my defense, I did give the link to the source code file which makes it easy to find the import. – n1r3 Jun 1 '16 at 10:09
  • 6
    I wanted to do this with Cats, but these type enrichments are obviously in Mouse... – Vesal Apr 15 '17 at 19:18
19

Option().collect() is a good pattern for this kind of thing.

Option(myBool).collect { case true => someResult }

from the REPL:

scala> (Option(true).collect { case true => 3 }, Option(false).collect { case true => 3 })
res3: (Option[Int], Option[Int]) = (Some(3),None)
1
  • 4
    drawbacks of this sollution: 1)almost the same amount of code(comparing to if(predicate) Some(result) else None)but semantics is weird 2)a bit of runtime overhead: a)null test (can be mitigated with Some(predicate)...) b)2 excessive objects are cteated(instances of Some and Lifted) c)excessive function calls – ievgen.garkusha Dec 28 '16 at 19:11
16

None of the other answers answer the question as stated! To get the exact semantics you specified use:

implicit class BoolToOption(val self: Boolean) extends AnyVal {
  def toOption[A](value: => A): Option[A] =
    if (self) Some(value) else None
}

You can then write

myBool.toOption(someResult)

eg:

scala> true.toOption("hi")
res5: Option[String] = Some(hi)

scala> false.toOption("hi")
res6: Option[String] = None
1
  • 3
    If you put this e.g. in object BoolImplicits { ... }, then do import BoolImplicits._ to be able to apply toOption to booleans. – beerbajay Sep 15 '16 at 21:35
9

If you don't mind someResult being evaluated no matter the value of myBool you can also use

Some(someResult).filter(myBool)
1
  • 9
    Some(someResult).filter(_ => myBool) – brendon Aug 11 '16 at 19:20
4
scala> PartialFunction.condOpt(5) { case x if true => x }
res9: Option[Int] = Some(5)

scala> PartialFunction.condOpt(5) { case x if false => x }
res10: Option[Int] = None

Here, the guard holds the condition and the value passed to condOpt is the value returned if the guard evaluates to true.

4

Another choice:

implicit class RichOptionCompanion(val self: Option.type) extends AnyVal {
  def when[A](cond: Boolean)(value: => A): Option[A] = if(cond) Some(value) else None
}

Usage:

Option.when(foo != "bar") { ... }
2
class RichBool[T](a: Boolean, res:=> T) {
   def toOption: Option[T] = if (a) Some(res) else None
}
implicit def boolToRichBool[T](tp: (Boolean, T)): RichBool[T] = new RichBool(tp._1, tp._2);

This would give you:

(true, 5).toOption // Some(5);
(false, 3).toOption // None
1
  • 4
    You may want to declare your argument as (a:Boolean, res: =>T) to avoid evaluating res in case a=false – n1r3 Oct 30 '13 at 18:25
2

Here are a couple things I would consider:

val bool: Boolean = ???
val result = 1337    

Option(bool).withFilter(identity).map(_ => result)

or

for {
  opt <- Option(bool)
  if opt
} yield result
1
  • 2
    Hello, first of all, welcome to StackOverflow. Now... instead of just posting your code could you please elaborate on what it does, how and why ? It is customary on SO to give an explanation along with code/links to docs etc so that people who ask questions understand better. Thank you. – Tuncay Göncüoğlu Oct 10 '18 at 16:13
0
Option(true).find(_ == true) // Some(true)
Option(false).find(_ == true) // None

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