1

Instead of making a script, it there a one liner to shuffle a large tab separated text file, based on the unique elements in the first column. That means, for each unique element in the first column, number of rows will be equal and be specified by the user.

There are two output possibilities, maintaining the row order or randomized row order.

Input :

chr1    3003204 3003454 *   37  +
chr1    3003235 3003485 *   37  +
chr1    3003148 3003152 *   37  -
chr1    3003461 3003711 *   37  +
chr11   71863609    71863647    *   37  +
chr11   71864025    71864275    *   37  +
chr11   71864058    71864308    *   37  -
chr11   71864534    71864784    *   37  +
chrY    90828920    90829170    *   23  -
chrY    90829096    90829346    *   23  +
chrY    90828924    90829174    *   23  -
chrY    90828925    90829175    *   23  -

Output (1 row per category - defined by the user) Output1 (randomized - row order will change) :

chr1    3003235 3003485 *   37  +
chr11   71863609    71863647    *   37  +
chrY    90828925    90829175    *   23  -

Output1 (randomized - row order will be maintained) :

chr1    3003204 3003454 *   37  +
chr11   71863609    71863647    *   37  +
chrY    90828920    90829170    *   23  -

I tried using sort -u with cut on first column to fetch unique elements and then running a combination of grep and head for each element to generate the output file, which can be randomized using shuf, there might be a better solution as the file can be huge > 50 Million lines.

Cheers

  • +1 for interesting question. – jkshah Oct 30 '13 at 19:51
1

Try using

Maintaining row order

awk '!($1 in a) {a[$1]=$0} END { asort(a,b); for (x in b) print b[x] }' file

Output:

chr1    3003204 3003454 *   37  +
chr11   71863609    71863647    *   37  +
chrY    90828920    90829170    *   23  -

Random row order

For this, just pipe output of shuf to above awk command

shuf file | awk '!($1 in a) {a[$1]=$0} END { asort(a,b); for (x in b) print b[x] }'

Output (different with each run)

chr1    3003148 3003152 *   37  -
chr11   71864025    71864275    *   37  +
chrY    90829096    90829346    *   23  +

Variable number of rows

#!/bin/bash
numRow=3
awk 'n[$1]<'$numRow' {a[$1]=a[$1]"\n"$0; n[$1]++} END { asort(a,b); for (x in b) print b[x] }' file

Output:

chr1    3003204 3003454 *   37  +
chr1    3003235 3003485 *   37  +
chr1    3003148 3003152 *   37  -

chr11   71863609    71863647    *   37  +
chr11   71864025    71864275    *   37  +
chr11   71864058    71864308    *   37  -

chrY    90828920    90829170    *   23  -
chrY    90829096    90829346    *   23  +
chrY    90828924    90829174    *   23  -
  • I like your answer, short and efficient. But how can I specify that instead of 1 row per chromosome (unique element forst column), give me 10 or 100 per chromosome! – Sukhdeep Singh Oct 31 '13 at 20:39
  • @SukhdeepSingh Additional requirement! that seems trickier. I will check and let you know. Meanwhile can you please update your question with this? – jkshah Oct 31 '13 at 20:48
  • It was already written in the original question, check the third line :) – Sukhdeep Singh Oct 31 '13 at 21:37
  • @SukhdeepSingh Please check updated ans with command for variable number of rows. – jkshah Oct 31 '13 at 21:47
  • 1
    @SukhdeepSingh Nope, it's not a problem in shell script. $1 inside single quote will be treated as first column and outside single quote or inside double quote will be treated as user argument awk 'n[$1]<'$numRow' {a[$1]=a[$1]"\n"$0; n[$1]++} END { asort(a,b); for (x in b) print b[x] }' $1 should work. – jkshah Nov 1 '13 at 4:32
1

Surely it's easier to write a script?

perl -n -e 'BEGIN{ %c=qw(chr1 4 chr11 4 chrY 4); $c{$_}=int(rand($c{$_})) for keys %c;  $r="^(".join("|",keys %c).")\\s";} print if (/$r/o and !$c{$1}--);' filename.txt

The BEGIN block is executed once when the script starts. The print if.. statement is used for each line in the file

The %c associative array has the keys to look for and the number of items with each key

$r is a regular expression that will look like ^(chr1|chr11|chrY)\s

If the regular expression is found then the matched key within the match is used as a lookup on the associative array which is decremented. When it is zero the line is printed

  • Nice solution, but the answer with is much shorter, and we don't have to specify the unique elements :) – Sukhdeep Singh Oct 31 '13 at 20:39
  • I haven't checked it but I imagine the other answer uses more memory – Vorsprung Oct 31 '13 at 21:09
1

If one likes to do this in Python with pandas. Here is my answer:

#!/bin/env python

import sys
import pandas as pd

column = 0
number = 1
method = pd.Series.head  # or pd.Series.sample

pd.read_table(sys.stdin, header=None) \
  .groupby(column) \
  .apply(method, n=number) \
  .to_csv(sys.stdout, sep="\t", index=False, header=False)

pd.read_table will read a tabular file. It does the same as pd.read_csv(..., sep='\t'). header=None will tell pandas not to use the first row as header, which it does by default.
.groupby will group by the given column of the DataFrame.
.apply(method, n=number) will call method on every group given the keyword argument n=number.
.to_csv will write the DataFrame, in this case tab-delimited, without the DataFrame's index and header to stdout.

Invoke the as follows:

%$ python myscript.py < ${input_tsv} > ${output_tsv}

Pandas is a big package and needs time to load. Therefor, this script is way slower than the awk script. But may be useful in within a bigger Python program.

Benchmarking:

A BED file containing 49144 records.

Running the Awk script from @jkshah in Zsh:

%$ awk '!($1 in a) {a[$1]=$0} END { asort(a,b); for (x in b) print b[x] }' ${bedfile} | sort >/dev/null
%$ shuf ${bedfile} | awk '!($1 in a) {a[$1]=$0} END { asort(a,b); for (x in b) print b[x] }' | sort >/dev/null

The first roughly 21 ms of wall time (avg. of 70 runs). The second roughly 30 ms of wall time (avg. of 70 runs).

Running the Python statement in IPython with the %timeit magic:

In [1]: %timeit pd.read_table("Every10cM.sort.bed", header=None).groupby(0).apply(pd.Series.head, n=1).to_csv(sep="\t", index=False, header=False)
In [2]: %timeit pd.read_table("Every10cM.sort.bed", header=None).groupby(0).apply(pd.Series.sample, n=1).to_csv(sep="\t", index=False, header=False)

Both roughly 72 ms of wall time (avg. of 70 runs). So it is quite slower...

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