124

I have a time as a number of milliseconds and I want to convert it to a HH:MM:SS format. It should wrap around, with milliseconds = 86400000 I want to get 00:00:00.

0

24 Answers 24

182

How about creating a function like this:

function msToTime(duration) {
  var milliseconds = Math.floor((duration % 1000) / 100),
    seconds = Math.floor((duration / 1000) % 60),
    minutes = Math.floor((duration / (1000 * 60)) % 60),
    hours = Math.floor((duration / (1000 * 60 * 60)) % 24);

  hours = (hours < 10) ? "0" + hours : hours;
  minutes = (minutes < 10) ? "0" + minutes : minutes;
  seconds = (seconds < 10) ? "0" + seconds : seconds;

  return hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds + "." + milliseconds;
}
console.log(msToTime(300000))

9
  • I have used this way for convert milliseconds to hours:minutes:seconds format.but i did not get it correctly.it is giving only 21:11:05 for all milliseconds.how can i implement this?
    – cheliyan
    Nov 9, 2013 at 10:19
  • 1
    var s = st_date+' '+start; var e = end_date+' '+end; var bits = s.split(/\D/); var bits1 = e.split(/\D/); var date = new Date(bits[0], --bits[1], bits[2], bits[3], bits[4],bits[5]); var date1 = new Date(bits1[0], --bits1[1], bits1[2], bits1[3], bits1[4],bits1[5]);
    – cheliyan
    Nov 9, 2013 at 10:21
  • var t1=date.getTime() var t2=date1.getTime() var t3=date1.getTime()-date.getTime(); var seconds; var minutes; var milliseconds = parseInt((t3%1000)/100) , seconds = parseInt((t3/1000)%60) , minutes = parseInt((t3/(1000*60))%60) , hours = parseInt((t3/(1000*60*60))%24); hours = (hours < 10) ? "0" + hours : hours; minutes = (minutes < 10) ? "0" + minutes : minutes; seconds = (seconds < 10) ? "0" + seconds : seconds; duration=hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds; alert('dur::'+t3); alert('duration:'+duration);
    – cheliyan
    Nov 9, 2013 at 10:21
  • 2
    If duration input param is already in milliseconds, why do you divide by 100 to get milliseconds? Shouldn't it be just parseInt(duration % 1000)?
    – NoBullMan
    Jul 28, 2020 at 17:15
  • 3
    should be var milliseconds = Math.floor(duration % 1000),
    – pseudozach
    May 25, 2021 at 16:14
81

To Convert time in millisecond to human readable format.

function msToTime(ms) {
  let seconds = (ms / 1000).toFixed(1);
  let minutes = (ms / (1000 * 60)).toFixed(1);
  let hours = (ms / (1000 * 60 * 60)).toFixed(1);
  let days = (ms / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24)).toFixed(1);
  if (seconds < 60) return seconds + " Sec";
  else if (minutes < 60) return minutes + " Min";
  else if (hours < 24) return hours + " Hrs";
  else return days + " Days"
}

console.log(msToTime(1000))
console.log(msToTime(10000))
console.log(msToTime(300000))
console.log(msToTime(3600000))
console.log(msToTime(86400000))

"Out Put Sample"

3
  • 4
    I found this one the most useful, the top answer didn't seem to handle hours very well in my testing and this also gives you the options of days.
    – ak85
    Apr 9, 2016 at 4:29
  • Fantastic! Thank you.
    – Björn C
    Feb 3, 2021 at 9:27
  • 6
    To me this answer is not helpful. What does "3.7" hours mean??? Jul 15, 2021 at 13:17
30

I had the same problem, this is what I ended up doing:

function parseMillisecondsIntoReadableTime(milliseconds){
  //Get hours from milliseconds
  var hours = milliseconds / (1000*60*60);
  var absoluteHours = Math.floor(hours);
  var h = absoluteHours > 9 ? absoluteHours : '0' + absoluteHours;

  //Get remainder from hours and convert to minutes
  var minutes = (hours - absoluteHours) * 60;
  var absoluteMinutes = Math.floor(minutes);
  var m = absoluteMinutes > 9 ? absoluteMinutes : '0' +  absoluteMinutes;

  //Get remainder from minutes and convert to seconds
  var seconds = (minutes - absoluteMinutes) * 60;
  var absoluteSeconds = Math.floor(seconds);
  var s = absoluteSeconds > 9 ? absoluteSeconds : '0' + absoluteSeconds;


  return h + ':' + m + ':' + s;
}


var time = parseMillisecondsIntoReadableTime(86400000);

alert(time);

0
23

Here is my solution

let h,m,s;
h = Math.floor(timeInMiliseconds/1000/60/60);
m = Math.floor((timeInMiliseconds/1000/60/60 - h)*60);
s = Math.floor(((timeInMiliseconds/1000/60/60 - h)*60 - m)*60);

// to get time format 00:00:00

s < 10 ? s = `0${s}`: s = `${s}`
m < 10 ? m = `0${m}`: m = `${m}`
h < 10 ? h = `0${h}`: h = `${h}`


console.log(`${s}:${m}:${h}`);
1
  • 4
    I'd set value to s outside the ternary operator: s = `${s < 10 ? '0': ''}${s}` Jun 23, 2020 at 21:07
21

This one returns time like youtube videos

    function getYoutubeLikeToDisplay(millisec) {
        var seconds = (millisec / 1000).toFixed(0);
        var minutes = Math.floor(seconds / 60);
        var hours = "";
        if (minutes > 59) {
            hours = Math.floor(minutes / 60);
            hours = (hours >= 10) ? hours : "0" + hours;
            minutes = minutes - (hours * 60);
            minutes = (minutes >= 10) ? minutes : "0" + minutes;
        }

        seconds = Math.floor(seconds % 60);
        seconds = (seconds >= 10) ? seconds : "0" + seconds;
        if (hours != "") {
            return hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds;
        }
        return minutes + ":" + seconds;
    }

Output:

  • getYoutubeLikeToDisplay(129900) = "2:10"
  • getYoutubeLikeToDisplay(1229900) = "20:30"
  • getYoutubeLikeToDisplay(21229900) = "05:53:50"
2
  • comment - does not work correctly for negative time for example -3000 should show -00:03 but it returns -1:0-03.
    – anu
    May 3, 2019 at 18:01
  • I made some improvements/adjustments stackoverflow.com/a/67462589
    – Sinjai
    May 9, 2021 at 21:56
13

Sorry, late to the party. The accepted answer did not cut it for me, so I wrote it myself.

Output:

2h 59s
1h 59m
1h
1h 59s
59m 59s
59s

Code (Typescript):

function timeConversion(duration: number) {
  const portions: string[] = [];

  const msInHour = 1000 * 60 * 60;
  const hours = Math.trunc(duration / msInHour);
  if (hours > 0) {
    portions.push(hours + 'h');
    duration = duration - (hours * msInHour);
  }

  const msInMinute = 1000 * 60;
  const minutes = Math.trunc(duration / msInMinute);
  if (minutes > 0) {
    portions.push(minutes + 'm');
    duration = duration - (minutes * msInMinute);
  }

  const seconds = Math.trunc(duration / 1000);
  if (seconds > 0) {
    portions.push(seconds + 's');
  }

  return portions.join(' ');
}

console.log(timeConversion((60 * 60 * 1000) + (59 * 60 * 1000) + (59 * 1000)));
console.log(timeConversion((60 * 60 * 1000) + (59 * 60 * 1000)              ));
console.log(timeConversion((60 * 60 * 1000)                                 ));
console.log(timeConversion((60 * 60 * 1000)                    + (59 * 1000)));
console.log(timeConversion(                   (59 * 60 * 1000) + (59 * 1000)));
console.log(timeConversion(                                      (59 * 1000)));
2
  • Thanks man, this is what I wanted. Had to adapt slightly to show '0h 0m 10s' etc but otherwise clean and simples
    – HazeyAce
    Apr 12, 2020 at 20:02
  • I started writing my own, then I thought, somebody must have done this already :). Thank you!
    – Ben S
    Apr 28, 2020 at 13:32
8

The above snippets don't work for cases with more than 1 day (They are simply ignored).

For this you can use:

function convertMS(ms) {
    var d, h, m, s;
    s = Math.floor(ms / 1000);
    m = Math.floor(s / 60);
    s = s % 60;
    h = Math.floor(m / 60);
    m = m % 60;
    d = Math.floor(h / 24);
    h = h % 24;
    h += d * 24;
    return h + ':' + m + ':' + s;
}

enter image description here

Thanks to https://gist.github.com/remino/1563878

2
  • 1
    To have more humanized output you can return something like: return ((h + '').length === 1 ? '0'+ h : h) + ':' + ('0' + m).substr(-2) + ':' + ('0' + s).substr(-2);
    – Vitall
    Mar 13, 2019 at 9:20
  • @Vitall Just use return (h < 10 ? "0" + h : h) + ":" + (m < 10 ? "0" + m : m) + ":" + (s < 10 ? "0" + s : s);, because it's way better doing this with math than a bunch of string manipulation. Feb 22, 2020 at 13:12
5

I needed time only up to one day, 24h, this was my take:

const milliseconds = 5680000;

const hours = `0${new Date(milliseconds).getHours() - 1}`.slice(-2);
const minutes = `0${new Date(milliseconds).getMinutes()}`.slice(-2);
const seconds = `0${new Date(milliseconds).getSeconds()}`.slice(-2);

const time = `${hours}:${minutes}:${seconds}`
console.log(time);

you could get days this way as well if needed.

3

This solution uses one function to split milliseconds into a parts object, and another function to format the parts object.

I created 2 format functions, one as you requested, and another that prints a friendly string and considering singular/plural, and includes an option to show milliseconds.

function parseDuration(duration) {
  let remain = duration

  let days = Math.floor(remain / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24))
  remain = remain % (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24)

  let hours = Math.floor(remain / (1000 * 60 * 60))
  remain = remain % (1000 * 60 * 60)

  let minutes = Math.floor(remain / (1000 * 60))
  remain = remain % (1000 * 60)

  let seconds = Math.floor(remain / (1000))
  remain = remain % (1000)

  let milliseconds = remain

  return {
    days,
    hours,
    minutes,
    seconds,
    milliseconds
  };
}

function formatTime(o, useMilli = false) {
  let parts = []
  if (o.days) {
    let ret = o.days + ' day'
    if (o.days !== 1) {
      ret += 's'
    }
    parts.push(ret)
  }
  if (o.hours) {
    let ret = o.hours + ' hour'
    if (o.hours !== 1) {
      ret += 's'
    }
    parts.push(ret)
  }
  if (o.minutes) {
    let ret = o.minutes + ' minute'
    if (o.minutes !== 1) {
      ret += 's'
    }
    parts.push(ret)

  }
  if (o.seconds) {
    let ret = o.seconds + ' second'
    if (o.seconds !== 1) {
      ret += 's'
    }
    parts.push(ret)
  }
  if (useMilli && o.milliseconds) {
    let ret = o.milliseconds + ' millisecond'
    if (o.milliseconds !== 1) {
      ret += 's'
    }
    parts.push(ret)
  }
  if (parts.length === 0) {
    return 'instantly'
  } else {
    return parts.join(' ')
  }
}

function formatTimeHMS(o) {
  let hours = o.hours.toString()
  if (hours.length === 1) hours = '0' + hours

  let minutes = o.minutes.toString()
  if (minutes.length === 1) minutes = '0' + minutes

  let seconds = o.seconds.toString()
  if (seconds.length === 1) seconds = '0' + seconds

  return hours + ":" + minutes + ":" + seconds
}

function formatDurationHMS(duration) {
  let time = parseDuration(duration)
  return formatTimeHMS(time)
}

function formatDuration(duration, useMilli = false) {
  let time = parseDuration(duration)
  return formatTime(time, useMilli)
}


console.log(formatDurationHMS(57742343234))

console.log(formatDuration(57742343234))
console.log(formatDuration(5423401000))
console.log(formatDuration(500))
console.log(formatDuration(500, true))
console.log(formatDuration(1000 * 30))
console.log(formatDuration(1000 * 60 * 30))
console.log(formatDuration(1000 * 60 * 60 * 12))
console.log(formatDuration(1000 * 60 * 60 * 1))

3

Worked for me

msToTime(milliseconds) {
    //Get hours from milliseconds
    var hours = milliseconds / (1000*60*60);
    var absoluteHours = Math.floor(hours);
    var h = absoluteHours > 9 ? absoluteHours : '0' + absoluteHours;

    //Get remainder from hours and convert to minutes
    var minutes = (hours - absoluteHours) * 60;
    var absoluteMinutes = Math.floor(minutes);
    var m = absoluteMinutes > 9 ? absoluteMinutes : '0' +  absoluteMinutes;

    //Get remainder from minutes and convert to seconds
    var seconds = (minutes - absoluteMinutes) * 60;
    var absoluteSeconds = Math.floor(seconds);
    var s = absoluteSeconds > 9 ? absoluteSeconds : '0' + absoluteSeconds;

    return h == "00" ? m + ':' + s : h + ':' + m + ':' + s;
}
0
3

Human-readable code for human-readable output and you can extend this to light years or nanoseconds or what have you very intuitively. Obviously you'd want to convert this to a function and re-use some of those intermediate modulo calls.

second = 1000 
minute = second * 60
hour = minute * 60 
day = hour * 24

test = 3 * day + 2 * hour + 11 * minute + 58 * second

console.log(Math.floor(test / day))
console.log(Math.floor(test % day / hour))
console.log(Math.floor(test % day % hour / minute))
console.log(Math.floor(test % day % hour % minute / second))
3

Extending on @Rick's answer, I prefer something like this:

function msToReadableTime(time){
  const second = 1000;
  const minute = second * 60;
  const hour = minute * 60;

  let hours = Math.floor(time / hour % 24);
  let minutes = Math.floor(time / minute % 60);
  let seconds = Math.floor(time / second % 60);
 

  return hours + ':' + minutes + ":" + seconds;
}
3
  • I like this, but what if minutes, for example, is < 10? Can you add padding?
    – ndtreviv
    Mar 31 at 19:52
  • @ndtreviv, no, it doesn't but you can add it easily, look at Shady's answer Apr 1 at 7:56
  • @ndtreviv padding: stackoverflow.com/a/67462589
    – Sinjai
    Apr 21 at 18:15
3

// The following is written in Typescript, should be easy to translate to JS

function humanReadableDuration(msDuration: int): string {
    const h = Math.floor(msDuration / 1000 / 60 / 60);
    const m = Math.floor((msDuration / 1000 / 60 / 60 - h) * 60);
    const s = Math.floor(((msDuration / 1000 / 60 / 60 - h) * 60 - m) * 60);

    // To get time format 00:00:00
    const seconds: string = s < 10 ? `0${s}` : `${s}`;
    const minutes: string = m < 10 ? `0${m}` : `${m}`;
    const hours: string = h < 10 ? `0${h}` : `${h}`;

    return `${hours}h ${minutes}m ${seconds}s`;
}
3

Format as hh:mm:ss with optional padding

(1:59:59 or 01:59:59)
(1:59 or 01:59)
(Default: no padding)

Based loosely on Chand's answer.

function formatMilliseconds(milliseconds, padStart) {
    function pad(num) {
        return `${num}`.padStart(2, '0');
    }
    let asSeconds = milliseconds / 1000;

    let hours = undefined;
    let minutes = Math.floor(asSeconds / 60);
    let seconds = Math.floor(asSeconds % 60);

    if (minutes > 59) {
        hours = Math.floor(minutes / 60);
        minutes %= 60;
    }

    return hours
        ? `${padStart ? pad(hours) : hours}:${pad(minutes)}:${pad(seconds)}`
        : `${padStart ? pad(minutes) : minutes}:${pad(seconds)}`;
}

Tests:

let s = 1000;
let m = 60*s;
let h = 60*m;
console.log(formatMilliseconds(1*h));               // 1:00:00
console.log(formatMilliseconds(1*h, true));         // 01:00:00
console.log(formatMilliseconds(59*m + 59*s));       // 59:59
console.log(formatMilliseconds(59*m + 59*s, true)); // 59:59
console.log(formatMilliseconds(9*m + 9*s));         // 9:09
console.log(formatMilliseconds(9*m + 9*s, true));   // 09:09
console.log(formatMilliseconds(5*s));               // 0:05
console.log(formatMilliseconds(5*s, true));         // 00:05
console.log(formatMilliseconds(2400*s));            // 40:00
console.log(formatMilliseconds(2400*s, true));      // 40:00

.
.
.
If you need millisecond precision, you can get the fractional part using the following:

(asSeconds % 1).toFixed(3).substring(1)

Your returns would end up looking like this (break it up for readability as necessary):

`${padStart ? pad(hours) : hours}:${pad(minutes)}:${pad(seconds)}${(asSeconds % 1).toFixed(3).substring(1)}`

There are probably better ways to do that, but this naive solution gets the job done.

Test:

let asSeconds = 59.5219;
let seconds = Math.floor(asSeconds);
console.log(`${pad(seconds)}${(asSeconds % 1).toFixed(3).substring(1)}`);
// Equivalent to above, without using `pad()`:
//console.log(`${String(seconds).padStart(2, '0')}${(asSeconds % 1).toFixed(3).substring(1)}`);

// Output: 59.522
2
  • This doesn't fulfill OP's requirement of 24 hours wrapping around to 00:00:00 (but then aren't you expressing a time on the clock rather than a duration?)
    – Sinjai
    May 10, 2021 at 20:09
  • This is probably a more sensible and idiomatic way to get just the decimal plus 3 digits: secondString = asSeconds.toFixed(3); secondString.substring(secondString.indexOf('.'));
    – Sinjai
    Nov 30, 2021 at 22:48
2

Based on @Chand answer. This is the implementation in Typescript. A bit safer than coercing types in JS. If you remove the type annotation should be valid JS. Also using new string functions to normalise the time.

function displayTime(millisec: number) {
 const normalizeTime = (time: string): string => (time.length === 1) ? time.padStart(2, '0') : time;

 let seconds: string = (millisec / 1000).toFixed(0);
 let minutes: string = Math.floor(parseInt(seconds) / 60).toString();
 let hours: string = '';

 if (parseInt(minutes) > 59) {
   hours = normalizeTime(Math.floor(parseInt(minutes) / 60).toString());
   minutes = normalizeTime((parseInt(minutes) - (parseInt(hours) * 60)).toString());
 }
 seconds = normalizeTime(Math.floor(parseInt(seconds) % 60).toString());

 if (hours !== '') {
    return `${hours}:${minutes}:${seconds}`;
 }
   return `${minutes}:${seconds}`;
}
2
  • 1
    Someone might find it useful.
    – Anastasis
    Jun 29, 2018 at 7:17
  • 1
    JS is evolving towards TypeScript. This will probably be valid JS soon. :-)
    – N8allan
    Oct 17, 2018 at 17:28
1

my solution

var sunriseMills = 1517573074000;         // sunrise in NewYork on Feb 3, 2018  - UTC time
var offsetCityMills = -5 * 3600 * 1000;   // NewYork delay to UTC 
var offsetDeviceMills =  new Date().getTimezoneOffset() * 60 * 1000 ;  // eg. I live in Romania (UTC+2) >> getTimezoneOffset() = 120

var textTime = new Date(sunriseMills + offsetCityMills + offsetDeviceMills) 
    .toLocaleTimeString('en-US', { hour: 'numeric', minute: 'numeric' });

textTime will become '7.04 AM'

1
  • This is influenced by your Romania setting in the operating system. I get '7:04 AM' Jul 21 at 7:19
1

I recently ran into this situation. My focus was on clean readability and reusability.

Use

(See function definition below)

timeUnits(86400000) // {days: 1, hours: 0, minutes: 0, seconds: 0, ms: 0}

Then you can use the data to do whatever you want (like build a string).

Other examples:

timeUnits(214870123) // {days: 2, hours: 11, minutes: 41, seconds: 10, ms: 123}
timeUnits('70123') // null

Function

/**
 * Converts milliseconds into greater time units as possible
 * @param {int} ms - Amount of time measured in milliseconds
 * @return {?Object} Reallocated time units. NULL on failure.
 */
function timeUnits( ms ) {
    if ( !Number.isInteger(ms) ) {
        return null
    }
    /**
     * Takes as many whole units from the time pool (ms) as possible
     * @param {int} msUnit - Size of a single unit in milliseconds
     * @return {int} Number of units taken from the time pool
     */
    const allocate = msUnit => {
        const units = Math.trunc(ms / msUnit)
        ms -= units * msUnit
        return units
    }
    // Property order is important here.
    // These arguments are the respective units in ms.
    return {
        // weeks: allocate(604800000), // Uncomment for weeks
        days: allocate(86400000),
        hours: allocate(3600000),
        minutes: allocate(60000),
        seconds: allocate(1000),
        ms: ms // remainder
    }
}

It's written in such a way so that you can easily implement other units (for example, where I commented out implementation for weeks) so long as you know their worth in milliseconds.

0
1

A Date object can be constructed from milliseconds:

const date = new Date(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, milliseconds);

In your question you say milliseconds seconds should 'wrap around' at 86400000. Since we know there are 86400000 milliseconds in a day, we can simply take the time from the date object, and ignore every other part of the date as irrelevant.

The time can then be obtained in any number of formats. The one you require matches that used in the United Kingdom, locale en-GB:

const hms = d.toLocaleTimeString('en-GB');
2
  • Clever, but only works for durations <24 hours
    – MHebes
    May 26 at 18:59
  • 1
    ahh misread op. Upvoted :)
    – MHebes
    May 30 at 18:22
0

If you're using typescript, this could be a good thing for you

enum ETime {
  Seconds = 1000,
  Minutes = 60000,
  Hours = 3600000,
  SecInMin = 60,
  MinInHours = 60,
  HoursMod = 24,
  timeMin = 10,
}

interface ITime {
  millis: number
  modulo: number
}

const Times = {
  seconds: {
    millis: ETime.Seconds,
    modulo: ETime.SecInMin,
  },
  minutes: {
    millis: ETime.Minutes,
    modulo: ETime.MinInHours,
  },
  hours: {
    millis: ETime.Hours,
    modulo: ETime.HoursMod,
  },
}

const dots: string = ":"

const msToTime = (duration: number, needHours: boolean = true): string => {
  const getCorrectTime = (divider: ITime): string => {
    const timeStr: number = Math.floor(
      (duration / divider.millis) % divider.modulo,
    )

    return timeStr < ETime.timeMin ? "0" + timeStr : String(timeStr)
  }

  return (
    (needHours ? getCorrectTime(Times.hours) + dots : "") +
    getCorrectTime(Times.minutes) +
    dots +
    getCorrectTime(Times.seconds)
  )
}
0

In my implementation I used Moment.js:

export default (value) => 
  const duration = moment.duration(value);

  const milliseconds = duration.milliseconds();
  const seconds = duration.seconds();
  const minutes = duration.minutes();
  const hours = duration.hours();
  const day = duration.days();

  const sDay = `${day}d `;
  const sHours = (hours < 10) ? `0${hours}h ` : `${hours}h `;
  const sMinutes = (minutes < 10) ? `0${minutes}' ` : `${minutes}' `;
  const sSeconds = (seconds < 10) ? `0${seconds}" ` : `${seconds}" `;
  const sMilliseconds = `${milliseconds}ms`;

  ...
}

Once got the strings, I composed them as I want.

0

I works for me as i get milliseconds=1592380675409 using javascript method getTime() which returns the number of milliseconds between midnight of January 1, 1970 and the specified date.

var d = new Date();//Wed Jun 17 2020 13:27:55 GMT+0530 (India Standard Time)
var n = d.getTime();//1592380675409 this value is store somewhere

//function call 
console.log(convertMillisecToHrMinSec(1592380675409));

var convertMillisecToHrMinSec = (time) => {
  let date = new Date(time);
  let hr = date.getHours();
  let min = date.getMinutes();
  let sec = date.getSeconds();

  hr = (hr < 10) ? "0"+ hr : hr;
  min = (min < 10) ? "0"+ min : min;
  sec = (sec < 10) ? "0"+ sec : sec;

  return hr + ':' + min + ":" + sec;//01:27:55
}
2
  • Explain your code, code without explanation is bad code. Jun 16, 2020 at 14:31
  • Thank you for the suggestion, i definitely explain my solution Jun 17, 2020 at 7:54
0

A refactor from @dusht to ES6+ and more functional:

const addPrefix = time => time < 10 ? '0' + time : time;
const toHours = time => addPrefix(Math.floor((time / (1000 * 60 * 60)) % 24));
const toMinutes = time => addPrefix(Math.floor((time / (1000 * 60)) % 60));
const toSeconds = (ime => addPrefix(Math.floor((time / 1000) % 60));
const toMiliseconds = time => Math.floor((time % 1000) / 100);


const milisecondToHoursAndMinute = time => {
  const hours = toHours(time);
  const minutes = toMinutes(time);
  const seconds = toSeconds(time);
  const miliseconds = toMiliseconds(time);

  return `${hours}:${minutes}:${seconds}.${miliseconds}`
}
0
let dateTimeStr = new Date(1949778000);
dateTimeStr = Math.floor(dateTimeStr/86400000) +' days '+ dateTimeStr.getHours() +' hours '+ dateTimeStr.getMinutes() +' minutes '+ dateTimeStr.getSeconds() +' seconds';
console.log(dateTimeStr);

You don't have to calculate the days if you don't need them

"22 days 16 hours 36 minutes 18 seconds"

0

I don't see the need for complication in all these answers, it's easy to add zeros by adding a power of 10:

function timeToString(t) {
  const value =
    ((t / 3600_000 % 24) | 0) * 10000 +
    ((t / 60_000 % 60) | 0) * 100 +
    ((t / 1_000 % 60) | 0);
  return (1000000 + value).toString().replace(/1(..)(..)(..)/, '$1:$2:$3');
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.