11

I have created this "threadsafe" generic property, that i can use between the main thread and a background Thread. I made it because i was tired of creating Lock-Objects for all my properties and variables.

TLockedProp<MyType> = class
private
  FMyProp:MyType;
  PropLock:TObject;
  procedure SetMyProp(const Value: MyType);
  function GetMyProp: MyType;
published
  property Value:MyType read GetMyProp write SetMyProp;
public
  Constructor Create;
  Destructor Destroy;override;
end;

{ TLockedProp<MyType> }

constructor TLockedProp<MyType>.Create;
begin
  inherited;
  PropLock:=TObject.create
end;

destructor TLockedProp<MyType>.Destroy;
begin
  PropLock.Free;
  inherited;
end;

function TLockedProp<MyType>.GetMyProp: MyType;
begin
  TMonitor.Enter(PropLock);
  result := FMyProp;
  TMonitor.Exit(PropLock);
end;

procedure TLockedProp<MyType>.SetMyProp(const Value: MyType);
begin
  TMonitor.Enter(PropLock);
  FMyProp := Value;
  TMonitor.Exit(PropLock);
end;

Are there any problems i am overlooking? This is some code using this property class. Tell me what you think.

TBgThread=class(TThread)
  private     
    FPaused: TLockedProp<boolean>;
    FCount:TLockedProp<integer>;

    procedure ChangeCount(pPlusMin:integer);
    function  GetPaused:boolean;
    function  GetCount:integer;
  public   
    constructor Create;
    destructor  Destroy;override;
    {Toggle Pause}
    procedure PausePlay;
  protected
    procedure Execute;override;
  published
    Property  Paused:boolean read GetPaused;
    Property  Count:integer read GetCount;
  end;
constructor TBgThread.Create();
begin
  inherited Create(true);;
  FPaused:=TLockedProp<boolean>.create;
  FPaused.Value:=false;     
  FCount:=TLockedProp<integer>.create;
  FCount.Value:=0;
end;
destructor TBgThread.Destroy;
begin
  FPaused.Free;
  FCount.free;     
  inherited;
end;
procedure TBgThread.Execute;
begin
  inherited; 
  Repeat
    if not Paused then begin
        Try
          //do something
        finally
          ChangeCount(+1);
        end;
    end else
      Sleep(90);
  Until Terminated;
end;

function TBgThread.GetCount: integer;
begin
  Result:=FCount.Value;
end;

procedure TBgThread.ChangeCount(pPlusMin: integer);
begin
  FCount.Value:=FCount.Value+pPlusMin;
end;

function TBgThread.GetPaused: boolean;
begin
  result := FPaused.Value;
end;

procedure TBgThread.PausePlay;
begin
  FPaused.Value:=not FPaused.Value;
end;
16

Your code is fine and will serialize read/write access to the property. The only comment that I would make is that you do not need to create a separate lock object. You can remove PropLock and lock on Self instead.

I have an almost identical class in my code base. The only differences are:

  1. I use a critical section rather than TMonitor because I still don't trust TMonitor. The early versions had a number of bugs and that dented my confidence. However, I suspect that the TMonitor code is most likely correct by now. So I see no reason for you to change.
  2. I use try/finally with the code that locks and unlocks. This is perhaps a little pessimistic on my part, because it's hard to see how you could usefully recover from exceptions in the getter and setter methods. Force of habit I suppose.

FWIW, my version of your class looks like this:

type
  TThreadsafe<T> = class
  private
    FLock: TCriticalSection;
    FValue: T;
    function GetValue: T;
    procedure SetValue(const NewValue: T);
  public
    constructor Create;
    destructor Destroy; override;
    property Value: T read GetValue write SetValue;
  end;

{ TThreadsafe<T> }

constructor TThreadsafe<T>.Create;
begin
  inherited;
  FLock := TCriticalSection.Create;
end;

destructor TThreadsafe<T>.Destroy;
begin
  FLock.Free;
  inherited;
end;

function TThreadsafe<T>.GetValue: T;
begin
  FLock.Acquire;
  Try
    Result := FValue;
  Finally
    FLock.Release;
  End;
end;

procedure TThreadsafe<T>.SetValue(const NewValue: T);
begin
  FLock.Acquire;
  Try
    FValue := NewValue;
  Finally
    FLock.Release;
  End;
end;

I guess there's really just one way to write this class!

  • 2
    Thnx for your answer, and i really appreciate the fact you shared your version of the class. Makes me feel more confidant as a programmer that i was able to come up with this solution myself . only 1 year of delphi under my belt ;). – r_j Oct 31 '13 at 10:23
  • Note that a critical section may have performance issues, if the class holding its buffer is smaller than the CPU cache line. See delphitools.info/2011/11/30/fixing-tcriticalsection It may be better/safer to add a small alignment buffer to the class definition, and rely on the OS critical section, instead of TCriticalSection class. – Arnaud Bouchez Nov 17 '15 at 9:05
  • how you write a example to show how to use this class? – peiman F. Jul 8 '18 at 18:40
  • @peiman there is one public property. How many possible ways could there be to use it – David Heffernan Jul 8 '18 at 19:17
  • i dont understand the concept yet,and im trying to get in by an example :) so your answer dont helped me :| i must create one TThreadsafe for each shared variable ?! – peiman F. Jul 8 '18 at 19:31

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