44

I have several named virtual hosts on the same apache server, for one of the virtual host I need to ensure only a specific set of IP addresses are allowed to access.

Please suggest the best way to do this. I have looked at mod_authz_hosts module but it does not look like I can do it inside virtual host.

50

The mod_authz_host directives need to be inside a <Location> or <Directory> block but I've used the former within <VirtualHost> like so for Apache 2.2:

<VirtualHost *:8080>
    <Location />
    Order deny,allow
    Deny from all
    Allow from 127.0.0.1
    </Location>

    ...
</VirtualHost>

Reference: https://askubuntu.com/questions/262981/how-to-install-mod-authz-host-in-apache

| improve this answer | |
35

For Apache 2.4, you would use the Require IP directive. So to only allow machines from the 192.168.0.0/24 network (range 192.168.0.0 - 192.168.0.255)

<VirtualHost *:80>
    <Location />
      Require ip 192.168.0.0/24
    </Location>
    ...
</VirtualHost>

And if you just want the localhost machine to have access, then there's a special Require local directive.

The local provider allows access to the server if any of the following conditions is true:

  • the client address matches 127.0.0.0/8
  • the client address is ::1
  • both the client and the server address of the connection are the same

This allows a convenient way to match connections that originate from the local host:

<VirtualHost *:80>
    <Location />
      Require local
    </Location>
    ...
</VirtualHost>
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Now for localhost for both ip4/6 you can write Require local per docs. – Alexei Martianov Mar 24 '18 at 3:24
  • Thanks @AlexeiMartianov I've amended my answer with your insight. – Jeff Puckett Mar 25 '18 at 17:27
  • Require local should be the answer, as it enables you to get your machine at all three of the following hosts: localhost, 127.0.0.1, and ServerAlias set in your vhost (plus ipv6 if enabled). – pydoge Dec 20 '18 at 8:45
  • 2
    @pydoge thanks! yeah it is really useful for only one specific IP address (localhost), but the OP technically is asking for "a specific set of IP addresses". And you're right, a lot of people (myself included), found this page while searching for how to restrict it to just localhost - like you point out – Jeff Puckett Dec 20 '18 at 15:57
7

If you are using apache 2.2 inside your virtual host you should add following directive (mod_authz_host):

Order deny,allow
Deny from all
Allow from 10.0.0.1

You can even specify a subnet

Allow from 10.0.0

Apache 2.4 looks like a little different as configuration. Maybe better you specify which version of apache are you using.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for the information I was able to configure this by adding the directives inside location tags within virtual hosts – frameworksnow Nov 8 '13 at 4:14
  • @frameworksnow well, if my answer is useful and you don't think this is the right answer, at least vote up ;) – giuliox Nov 8 '13 at 16:22
  • I tried but I don't have the privilege to vote it up as per SO. I hope I get more reputation in SO soon and will come back and vote up. Thank you again for providing the input. – frameworksnow Nov 9 '13 at 2:53
  • The subnet can also be specified as Allow from 192.168.1.0/24, which is way more idiomatic and flexible, IMO. – MayeulC Sep 17 '17 at 22:57
4

In Apache 2.4, the authorization configuration syntax has changed, and the Order, Deny or Allow directives should no longer be used.

The new way to do this would be:

<VirtualHost *:8080>
    <Location />
        Require ip 192.168.1.0
    </Location>
    ...
</VirtualHost>

Further examples using the new syntax can be found in the Apache documentation: Upgrading to 2.4 from 2.2

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