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So I have gotten the program to work, my problem so far is that my solution requires that the output look like this [44, 76, 34, 98, 1, 99] but I keep getting ['1', '2', '3', '5', '6', '7'] if my input was 44 76 44 34 98 34 1 44 99 1 1 1

Trying to convert the final solution into an int and then back into a string does not work, I still end up with quotations.

The point of the code BTW is to remove duplicates from a given input and print it out in a list

def eliminateDuplicates(lst): 
    newlist = []
    for number in lst:
        if number not in newlist:
            newlist.append(number)
    return newlist

def main():
    numbers =(input("Enter numbers separated by space: "))
    x = ((numbers.split()))
    print("The distinct numbers are: ", (eliminateDuplicates(x))) 

main()
  • Are you asking why the quotes are there or how to get rid of them? The answer to the first question should be pretty easy, right? input gives you a string and split breaks up a string into a list of strings. Perhaps you can take it from here? List comprehensions? map? Lots of choices for you. – Ray Toal Nov 1 '13 at 5:02
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In the first line we store the input in d. In the second line we convert d into set() and back to list(). In the third line we map() d to integer.

d = raw_input("Enter Numbers: ").split()
d = list(set(d))
d = map(int, d)
print d
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Try this:

print("The distinct numbers are: ", map(int, eliminateDuplicates(x)))
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  • Thanks a lot. Using map helped get me my solution. BTW can you please explain how map works if you don't mind. The functions page does not really do a good job at explaining it. – user2767528 Nov 1 '13 at 5:08
  • Sure. map(a, lst) means "take this function of one argument, a, apply it to each member of list lst, and return a list of the results." So, for example, map(lambda x: x+1, [1,2,3]) would return [2,3,4]. – Christian Ternus Nov 1 '13 at 5:10
  • map, along with (whatever your language calls 'em) reduce and filter, are the basic building blocks of functional programming. If you ever learn a LISP-like language, Clojure, Scala, Erlang, Haskell, or a similar language, you'll get comfortable with it. Happy coding! – Christian Ternus Nov 1 '13 at 5:13
  • Ah, I get it now. Thank you so much Christian, you would make a better teacher than a lot of mine, lol. – user2767528 Nov 1 '13 at 5:25
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If the parameter lst is supposed to be a list, why don't you enter a list as input? (Instead of numbers separated by space). Then you can ommit the split stuff:

def eliminateDuplicates(lst): 
    newlist = []
    for number in lst:
        if number not in newlist:
            newlist.append(number)
    return newlist

def main():
    numbers =(input("Enter numbers as a list: "))
    print("The distinct numbers are: ", (eliminateDuplicates(numbers))) 
main()
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  • I was told that the input has to be a integer. and yeah just using the map function got me my answer. Thanks a lot. – user2767528 Nov 1 '13 at 5:07
  • If your problem says specifically: the input must be an integer. Then you may want to read them one by one. Because when you are giving the input by separated spaces, that's a string. (Just taking it literally) – Christian Nov 1 '13 at 5:10
  • This answer only works in Python 2. In Python 3 (which I suspect the questioner is using), input is equivalent to Python 2's raw_input. So input() always returns a string. – Blckknght Nov 1 '13 at 7:11
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Hope this helps:

from collections import OrderedDict
def eliminateDuplicates(lst): 
    newlist = [int(x) for x in lst]
    newlist = list(OrderedDict.fromkeys(newlist))
    return newlist

def main():
    numbers =(input("Enter numbers separated by space: "))
    x = ((numbers.split()))
    print("The distinct numbers are: ", (eliminateDuplicates(x))) 
main()
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The reason you're getting quotation marks around your numbers when you print them is because you're printing a list, which implicitly converts the list to a string (using str). The list type's __str__ method uses the repr of each of its list items. The repr of a string puts quotes around it.

There's a good reason for this. repr is supposed to be a computer-friendly represnetation of an object. If possible, it should create a duplicate of the object when evaled. If lists or strings behaved differently when printed, a list like ["foo", "bar, baz", "quux"] would have an ambiguous repr.

Converting the input values to integers (as other answers have suggested) is one solution, but not a necessary one for this task. Your deduplicating function works just fine with lists of strings. If the output formatting is the only issue, you can str.format and str.join to create an output string in the form you want from your list of strings, rather than printing the list directly. For instance:

print("The distinct numbers are: [{}]".format(", ".join(eliminateDuplicates(x)))
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