31

Consider the following code

a = "col1"
b = "col2"
d = data.frame(a=c(1,2,3),b=c(4,5,6))

This code produces the following data frame

  a b
1 1 4
2 2 5
3 3 6

However the desired data frame is

  col1 col2
1 1    4
2 2    5
3 3    6

Further, I'd like to be able to do something like d$a which would then grab d$col1 since a = "col1"

How can I tell R that "a" is a variable and not a name of a column?

5
  • 9
    You can't use $ like that. See here for more information on why. You can however do d[ , a ] to achieve what you want. – Simon O'Hanlon Nov 1 '13 at 16:28
  • Try out this code. Any idea how to avoid this error, or what this error is? columnName = "col1"; value = 5; d = data.frame(); d[,columnName] = value; – CodeGuy Nov 1 '13 at 16:53
  • You have an empty data frame. There is no variable "columnName" in it, so you can't call it or assign a value to it. – gung - Reinstate Monica Nov 1 '13 at 16:56
  • So how can I fix this so it works? I want to start with an empty data frame – CodeGuy Nov 1 '13 at 16:57
  • I suppose you could start w/ d = data.frame(NA), although you'd always have a column of NAs in your data frame. I don't usually start w/ an empty data frame. – gung - Reinstate Monica Nov 1 '13 at 17:04
39

After creating your data frame, you need to use ?colnames. For example, you would have:

d = data.frame(a=c(1,2,3), b=c(4,5,6))
colnames(d) <- c("col1", "col2")

You can also name your variables when you create the data frame. For example:

d = data.frame(col1=c(1,2,3), col2=c(4,5,6))

Further, if you have the names of columns stored in variables, as in

a <- "col1"

you can't use $ to select a column via d$a. R will look for a column whose name is a. Instead, you can do either d[[a]] or d[,a].

4
  • 3
    In case of data.frame, names(d)<- c("col1", "col2") will do. – Metrics Nov 1 '13 at 16:34
  • 1
    That's a good point, @Metrics. In truth, I almost never use names(); colnames() seems conceptually clearer to me. Is there some benefit, other than typing 3 fewer characters? – gung - Reinstate Monica Nov 1 '13 at 16:49
  • You are correct @gung. That also holds if you want consistency :) – Metrics Nov 1 '13 at 16:55
  • @Metrics, consistency in what sense? A list doesn't have colnames, but a data.frame is a type of a list. On the other hand, data.frames are similar to a rectangular matrix which has colnames and rownames.... Sigh... – A5C1D2H2I1M1N2O1R2T1 Nov 1 '13 at 17:27
10

You can do it this way

a = "col1"
b = "col2"
d = data.frame(a=c(1,2,3),b=c(4,5,6))

>d
  a b
1 1 4
2 2 5
3 3 6

#Renaming the columns
names(d) <- c(a,b)
> d
  col1 col2
1    1    4
2    2    5
3    3    6

#Calling by names
 d[,a]

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.