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I'm making a memory reader for a game, and I've got an almost infinite thread running in the background which checks for the players position, and then displays it on a label by using Invoke(). I'll only post the offending function. This gets called on the same thread every 10 ms.

Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate
        {
            lblCoords.Text = "Player Coordinates: < " + (int)x + ", " + (int)y + ", " + (int)z + " >";
        });

After the code has been running for about 20 minutes, it will crash and throw a StackOverflowException related to this function. Why is it happening and how can I stop it? Obviously I could just stop using a label to show it, though it would be more useful to know why it's happening for future reference.

So this is the thread method, someone mentioned that it's multiple objects getting created at once, I'm going to assume it's this because it is an infinite loop of calling UpdateThread()... Should this have a while loop instead of calling itself?

private void UpdateThread()
    {
        if (!running) return;

        ReadPos();

        Thread.Sleep(100);
        UpdateThread();
    }

private void ReadPos()
    {
        int pointerAddress = Memory.HexToDec(MemoryOffsets.PlayerPosAddress);

        byte[] xVal = memory.PointerRead((IntPtr)pointerAddress, 4, MemoryOffsets.PlayerX);
        byte[] yVal = memory.PointerRead((IntPtr)pointerAddress, 4, MemoryOffsets.PlayerY);
        byte[] zVal = memory.PointerRead((IntPtr)pointerAddress, 4, MemoryOffsets.PlayerZ);

        float x = BitConverter.ToSingle(xVal, 0);
        float y = BitConverter.ToSingle(yVal, 0);
        float z = BitConverter.ToSingle(zVal, 0);

        Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate
        {
            lblCoords.Text = "Player Coordinates: < " + (int)x + ", " + (int)y + ", " + (int)z + " >";
        });
    }

The error the program was showing me pointed at the Invoke method, which is why I thought it was just that causing it. Since it takes about 20 minutes for the exception to occur, I can't get too much information about it.

  • StackOverflowException implies a call stack too deep, probably some kind of unbounded recursion. I suspect the problem is not in the code you show, but in how you call it. Could you post the call stack at the moment of the exception? that would be of help. [You can edit your question] – Theraot Nov 1 '13 at 21:55
  • I presume you're creating instances of an object over and over again. – DaveDev Nov 1 '13 at 21:56
  • The code you have shown, by itself, won't cause an SOE. You'll need to provide enough to replicate the problem. – Servy Nov 1 '13 at 21:59
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Should this have a while loop instead of calling itself? Yes, by all means.

Sanly C# will not generate tail calls for this code, meaning it will stack the calls of UpdateThread until the call stack is full. This is causing the StackOverflowException.

So, you would implement something like this:

private void UpdateThread()
{
    while (running) //I'm assuming running is a volatile variable
    {
       ReadPos();
       Thread.Sleep(100);
    }
}

Note: It is good idea to make running volatile, as it will be set by another thread (I presume).

You could also consider to post the execution to the thread loop or a similar scheduling mechanism instead of having a dedicated thread, on that regard, do your testing to see what works best.


Another thing to consider is to keep your delegate object alive, it will reduce pressure on the garbage collector (since you are currently creating too many short lived objects), but it is not the cause of the StackOverflowException.

  • Okay, thanks. I assumed it would be alright to keep re-calling the method because I've seen it on a bunch of tutorials. – Jordan Nov 1 '13 at 22:18
  • @Jordan are those tutorials for C#? Shame on them! That would be ok in a language that generate proper tail calls (such as F#) but not in C#. – Theraot Nov 1 '13 at 22:22
  • Yeah, they were for C# which is why I did it. – Jordan Nov 2 '13 at 22:03
0

Yes, you should use a loop instead.

You are using recursion to make a loop, and as the loop doesn't have a reasonable limit it will fill up the stack with call frames.

Just loop inside the method:

private void UpdateThread()
{
    while (running) {
      ReadPos();
      Thread.Sleep(100);
    }
}

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