61

For example, which is the difference between these:

<iframe srcdoc="<p>Some HTML</p>"></iframe>
<iframe src="data:text/html,<p>Some HTML</p>"></iframe>

Demo

And, in case they are exactly the same, why did HTML5 add srcdoc attribute?

Edit

Maybe I wasn't clear enough. I am not comparing src with srcdoc, but src using text/html data URI with srcdoc.

Then, if the functionality chart is like this

                   |  src attribute       |  srcdoc attribute
 --------------------------------------------------------------------
  URL              |  Yes                 |  No without using src (*)
  HTML content     |  Yes, using data URI |  Yes

why is srcdoc needed?


(*) Note:

It seems srcdoc can be used to load a page by URL (Demo), using a subiframe with srcattribute:

<iframe srcdoc="<iframe src='http://microsoft.com'></iframe>"></iframe>
38

The other answers list some superficial differences, but really miss the mark of the key difference that explains why browsers/spec writers would essentially duplicate something that already exists:

<iframe src="data:...untrusted content" sandbox /> <- Secure in modern browsers, insecure in legacy browsers with no sandbox support

<iframe srcdoc="...untrusted content" sandbox /> <- Secure in modern browsers, secure (though non-functional) in legacy browsers

This new syntax provides content authors a way to protect their users, even when they may be using legacy browsers. Without it, content authors would be reluctant to use the sandbox feature at all, and it would not see use.

  • If the main benefit is untrusted content, why spec it to contain the content inline — doesn't most untrusted content come from external URLs? I.e. why not sandboxedsrc attribute that takes a [data] URI? (It'd also avoid some future browser from implementing srcdoc without implementing sandbox). – Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Dec 9 '15 at 9:38
  • Because authors can already use external urls (on a separate domain) to serve untrusted content. – Fabio Beltramini Dec 10 '15 at 17:45
  • What do you mean by secure? It can’t access the embedding page? The embedding paye can’t access it? Or both? Or what – Gregory Magarshak Jun 30 at 16:59
  • Otherwise What is the point of this over a regular div or HTML component – Gregory Magarshak Jun 30 at 17:01
  • Any article on iframe's "sandbox" will discuss what benefits it provides – Fabio Beltramini Jul 1 at 17:14
17

From MDN :

1. The content of the page that the embedded context is to contain. This attribute is expected to be used together with the sandbox and seamless attributes. If a browser supports the srcdoc attribute, it will override the content specified in the src attribute (if present). If a browser does NOT support the srcdoc attribute, it will show the file specified in the src attribute instead (if present).

So, the srcdoc attribute overrides the content embedded using src attribute.

Demo


Also, what you are saying about the following snippet data:text/html is called Data URI and it has limitations..

2. Data URIs cannot be larger than 32,768 characters.

1. MDN, 2. MSDN

  • "So, the srcdoc attribute overrides the content embedded using src attribute." Apparently not in Firefox 24, I see two IFrames with Microsoft's website in it. – Marcel Korpel Nov 2 '13 at 15:49
  • @MarcelKorpel The first version of Firefox which supports srcdoc is 25 (developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/…) – Oriol Nov 2 '13 at 15:51
  • @Oriol Ah, that explains a lot, thanks. – Marcel Korpel Nov 2 '13 at 15:52
  • 1
    @MrAlien Good point about the length limitation of data URIs, unlike html attributes which have no limit. Anyway, it seems that limit is imposed by Microsoft implementation, because MDN don't say anything about a limit, and the RFC standard only says "Note that some applications that use URLs may impose a length limit" – Oriol Nov 2 '13 at 15:57
  • @MarcelKorpel take aalook at seamless attribute and other newer html5 attributes and you will get why you need srcdoc – Mr. Alien Nov 2 '13 at 16:27
14

Iframe with src attribute with HTML Content is cross domain,

But iframe with srcDoc attribute with HTML Content is not cross domain

  • 2
    That's a good point, Chrome treats data URIs as cross domain. Firefox treats them as same origin, not sure what Edge does. – Oriol Jan 23 '17 at 15:59
  • What do you mean by “not cross domain”? – Gregory Magarshak Jun 30 at 16:52
13

As of writing - srcdoc in Chrome (v36) allows the setting and fetching of cookies, whereas the use of src with data URL does not:

Uncaught SecurityError: Failed to read the 'cookie' property from 'Document': Cookies are disabled inside 'data:' URLs

This may or may not be important to you, but rules out the use of data URLs in the application I am building, which is a shame, as of course IE doesn't support srcdoc currently (v11).

  • 1
    Good point. Data URIs have limitations on some browsers, so srcdoc works better in those cases. – Oriol Aug 2 '14 at 22:04
3

Another noticeable difference is that src attributes with data-uri support URI percent-encoding rules while srcdoc doesn't as it supports regular html syntax,

these sources will yield differently:

<iframe srcdoc="<p>hello%20world</p><h1>give%0D%0Ame%0D%0Asome%24</h1>"></iframe>

<iframe src="data:text/html;charset=UTF-8,<p>hello%20datauri<p><h1>give%0D%0A me%0D%0Asome%24</h1>"></iframe>

I also noticed a difference in the parsing of js scripts inside the attributes value( it's probably more than just percentage-encoding ) but didn't figure the rule yet...

  • The content of src has to be URL-encoded to be treated correctly. See this question for details on how to do that. – user Jul 9 '17 at 19:15
0

In your example the two forms are functionally identical. However, you can use both src and srcdoc attributes, allowing non-HTML5 browsers to use the src version, while HTML5 browsers can use the srcdoc version along with the sandbox and seamless attributes which offer more flexibility in how an iFrame is treated.

  • But sandbox and seamless attributes can be used too with src attribute, can't they? It seems to me that it's src which is more flexible than srcdoc – Oriol Nov 2 '13 at 16:00
  • @Oriol, I think my answer goes directly to why this is important, not as a flaw, but as a feature – Fabio Beltramini Jul 7 '15 at 19:19
-3

srcdoc: The content of the page that the embedded context is to contain. This attribute is expected to be used together with the sandbox and seamless attributes. If a browser supports the srcdoc attribute, it will override the content specified in the src attribute (if present). If a browser does NOT support the srcdoc attribute, it will show the file specified in the src attribute instead (if present).

src: The URL of the page to embed.

  • 6
    But src attribute can contain the HTML content of the page too, using data URIs – Oriol Nov 2 '13 at 16:01
-4

The main difference is that the 'src' attribute contains the address of the document you are going to embed in the tag.

On the other hand 'srcdoc'attribute contains the HTML content of the page to show in the inline frame.

the main disadvantage of srcdoc is that it is not supported in all browsers whereas src is compatible with all the browsers.

for detailed explanation please go through the following link: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/iframe

  • 6
    But src attribute can contain the HTML content of the page too, using data URIs – Oriol Nov 2 '13 at 15:45

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