0
while (status)

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)

Is the following syntactically correct:

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++ && status)

I am trying to have the for loop break early if status is true.

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  • you mean "break early if statis is false", right?. That'll be for (int i=0; i<3 && status; ++i) – sellibitze Dec 29 '09 at 15:49
16

Syntactically, you might want to use:

for (int i = 0; i < 3 && status; i++)

which is valid.

Some consider it bad form though, as it leads to more complicated loops and annoyed maintenance programmers. Another alternative you might want to explore would be:

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
     if (!status) { break; }
}
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  • So what would be considered good form? Using a while loop instead? – Brandon Tiqui Dec 29 '09 at 12:06
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    I've added an example using break, which is (debatably) better form. If you've got a copy of Code Complete handy there's a whole chapter on the readability of control structures, so that's hardly the end of the discussion. – Adam Luchjenbroers Dec 29 '09 at 12:15
  • I'm voting this up in anticipation of all the "never-use-break-in-loops" crowd (that I disagree with) soon to berate you. I just can't resist poking people with a stick :-) – paxdiablo Dec 29 '09 at 12:26
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    pax and MAK are up in arms about fighting some "battle" against some "crowd" and completely missed that it needs to be !status if moved from the for condition to an if statement. Maybe there's something to the idea this hurts maintainability. – Roger Pate Dec 29 '09 at 12:40
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    Yeah, who cares what we say or do as long as there's a smiley at the end. It's all fun 'n' games until someone loses an eye. .-) – Roger Pate Dec 29 '09 at 13:26
2

"I am trying to have the for loop break early if status is true. " The preferred way to do this is with an if statement in the body of the for loop.

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) { if(status) break; }

2

I suspect the following is syntactically correct:

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++ && status)

but its probably not what you mean. As pointed out by Adam, you probably want:

for (int i = 0; i < 3 && status; ++i)

This has all the meaning you want and all the details of the loop conditions are in the for statement.

The alternative form:

for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
     if (!status) { break; }
}

is useful if you want some code before or after the if, but the if becomes less visible to the maintenance programmer.

Note: With status in the for statement, the loop may never run if status is false.

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Syntactically correct yes. But the meaning is different. The first piece of code, run your for loop while status is equal to 1. The second piece of code, run only the for loop for 10 times and then exits.

0

Instead of setting status to true you should just use "break".

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